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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the…

Abstract

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the woman still be covered by the Act if she were employed on like work in succession to the man? This is the question which had to be solved in Macarthys Ltd v. Smith. Unfortunately it was not. Their Lordships interpreted the relevant section in different ways and since Article 119 of the Treaty of Rome was also subject to different interpretations, the case has been referred to the European Court of Justice.

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Managerial Law, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Gareth James Young

To explore the way in which responses to urban disorder have become part of the anti-social behaviour (ASB herein) toolkit following the 2011 disorders in England. In…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the way in which responses to urban disorder have become part of the anti-social behaviour (ASB herein) toolkit following the 2011 disorders in England. In particular, the purpose of this paper is to unpack the government’s response to the riots through the use of eviction. It is argued that the boundaries of what constitutes ASB, and the geographical scope of the new powers, are being expanded resulting in a more pronounced unevenness of behaviour-control mechanisms being deployed across the housing tenures.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative research design, 30 in-depth interviews were undertaken with housing, ASB, and local police officers alongside a number of other practitioners working in related fields. These practitioners were based in communities across east London, the West Midlands and Greater Manchester. This was augmented with a desk-based analysis of key responses and reports from significant official bodies, third sector and housing organisations.

Findings

Findings from the research show that responses to the 2011 riots through housing and ASB-related mechanisms were disproportionate, resulting in a rarely occurring phenomenon being unnecessarily overinflated. This paper demonstrates, through the lens of the 2011 riots specifically, how the definition of ASB continues to be expanded, rather than concentrated, causing noticeable conflicts within governmental approaches to ASB post-2011.

Research limitations/implications

This research was undertaken as part of a PhD study and therefore constrained by financial and time implications. Another limitation is that the “riot-clause” being considered here has not yet been adopted in practice. Despite an element of supposition, understanding how the relevant authorities may use this power in the future is important nonetheless.

Originality/value

Much effort was expended by scholars to analyse the causes of the 2011 riots in an attempt to understand why people rioted and what this says about today’s society more broadly. Yet very little attention has been focused on particular legislative responses, such as the additional riot clause enacted through the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014. This paper focuses on this particular response to explore more recent ways in which people face being criminalised through an expansion of behaviour defined as ASB.

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Safer Communities, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

COLIN HASTINGS

“There are four people who should be the hub of the wheel in my factory” said James Young. James is production director of a factory making fast‐moving knitwear, where the…

Abstract

“There are four people who should be the hub of the wheel in my factory” said James Young. James is production director of a factory making fast‐moving knitwear, where the mix is always changing according to fashion and season. “The trouble is”, he continued, “that the organisation chart makes them look more like the four legs of a table. The structure doesn't say that they are a team but they have to be”. The four managers that he is referring to are the market forecaster, the production planner, the raw materials buyer and the distribution manager. “One cannot sneeze without the others being affected. And if they don't get it right, and can't see themselves as a team, then I know only too well what that does to my already‐narrow margins. Each of them needs to be very different, but what each must have is a teamworking mentality” …. “Our audit teams are constantly changing as an audit progresses”, said a senior partner of one of the big five accountancy firms. This presents problems both for the audit manager as to how best to lead and develop his team, and for the individual auditors who often experience problems slotting into the team. And that can affect our clients adversely too which of course is not good for our business”. A large air‐conditioning contractor finds similar problems with on‐site teams. He needs to retain labour flexibility. His clients don't always like the changes. His team managers have to be skilled not only in managing the team, but they must also be adept at relating to the client and ensuring that they get the resources they need from the organisation. The team members in turn must learn to slot quickly into the new team. “All our people need to learn the same teamworking language”, says the managing director”. “There's no time to invent new rules for each new team”. The 3M company in the USA brings over one hundred new products to the market every year. They do this by creating a large number of small ad hoc teams to develop ideas and test‐market them very quickly. Some individuals find themselves involved in a number of these “venture teams” simultaneously. A major pharmaceutical company in the UK alone has one hundred and forty “temporary task groups” working on a wide range of products and issues, “I've counted a number of key managers who are involved in as many as twelve of these group”, says Alan Ladd, the management development manager. “Money spent on improving the teamworking skills of those and other managers is quite simply a major investment in the future of our business. My problem is, how do I do it?”

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

William K. Beatty

The term “medical” will be interpreted broadly to include both basic and clinical sciences, related health fields, and some “medical” elements of biology and chemistry. A

Abstract

The term “medical” will be interpreted broadly to include both basic and clinical sciences, related health fields, and some “medical” elements of biology and chemistry. A reference book is here defined as any book that is likely to be consulted for factual information more frequently than it will be picked up and read through in sequential order. Medical reference books have a place in public, school, college, and other non‐medical libraries as well as in the wide variety of medical libraries. All of these libraries will be considered in this column. A basic starting collection of medical material for a public library is outlined and described in an article by William and Virginia Beatty that appeared in the May, 1974, issue of American Libraries.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1910

A DISTINGUISHED editor, when returning a rejected contribution, remarked: “Before you attempt to write on any subject be quite certain that you can say something fresh…

Abstract

A DISTINGUISHED editor, when returning a rejected contribution, remarked: “Before you attempt to write on any subject be quite certain that you can say something fresh about it.” I am not very confident of my qualification to say anything fresh on the well‐worn topic of cataloguing, but I will endeavour, with your kind forbearance, to introduce a part of the subject which has not yet been treated separately, rather than to bring forward one of the more important branches which has already received considerable attention. This is my apology for asking you to consider the dry and uncompromising subject of the signs and symbols which should be understood in cataloguing.

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New Library World, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2013

Andra Gillespie

Purpose – Cory Booker will likely step down as mayor of Newark in 2014 or 2018. When he does, the possibility of a strong Latino candidate emerging is quite likely. There…

Abstract

Purpose – Cory Booker will likely step down as mayor of Newark in 2014 or 2018. When he does, the possibility of a strong Latino candidate emerging is quite likely. There are a number of black politicians who would like to succeed Booker as well. This chapter identifies eight potential successors to Booker and assesses their ability to create a multiracial electoral coalition using prior vote performance in citywide elections.Design/methodology/approach – This study regresses district (or precinct) level vote preferences for the aforementioned potential successors in previous elections on the racial and ethnic composition of the district, using voter district demographic data from 2000 and 201011The 2010 data is still incomplete at the time of publication. As such, this data will be used sparingly. compiled by the US Census Bureau and the Minnesota Population Center.Findings − There is a decade’s worth of evidence suggesting racially polarized voting among blacks and Latinos in Newark. The racialized black and Latino candidates examined in this chapter had much stronger support in districts with large coethnic populations. In contrast, the more deracialized candidates often had softer support in districts with high concentrations of coethnic voters, but often performed better in districts with higher concentrations of non-coethnics.Originality/value − While the author cautions against reading too much into the findings, the results do portend a future of racially polarized voting in Newark, especially as the city’s population diversifies and as different factions vie for power.

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21st Century Urban Race Politics: Representing Minorities as Universal Interests
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-184-7

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Mackenzie Mountford

Sexual violence’s alarming prevalence demands action to challenge the gendered and generational relations that sustain injustice. This chapter introduces a nuanced model…

Abstract

Sexual violence’s alarming prevalence demands action to challenge the gendered and generational relations that sustain injustice. This chapter introduces a nuanced model of consent that, if utilised to inform adults’ everyday practices with children, could empower children to identify and engage in healthy relationships and manage sexual victimisation. Inadequate sex education in adolescence engenders harmful beliefs about consent, which hinder young people’s abilities to navigate sexual relationships and limit the extent to which sexual assault survivors can understand their trauma. Accordingly, effective consent education is critical to protect and empower all human beings. Drawing on decades of childhood studies research that exemplifies the ways in which children learn through experience, this chapter argues that, by practising consent with children, adults can facilitate children’s knowledge of this moral concept. To equip adults with the thorough understanding of consent necessary to engage in truly consensual relationships, this chapter presents a theoretical explanation of children’s agency, recognising that structure, personal elements, and relationships collectively influence, and are shaped by, children’s participation. Based on a recognition of parents’ distinct role in children’s education, this model is examined in the context of children’s experiences in the home. Specifically, this analysis considers the ethics of corporal punishment and explores parental practices that could better facilitate children’s learning. The themes in this chapter emphasise the dangers of assumptions and raise fundamental questions about the ways in which society approaches human dignity and justice.

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Bringing Children Back into the Family: Relationality, Connectedness and Home
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-197-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Nina Schuller

The creation of the Commission for Equality and Human Rights presents a real opportunity to re‐assess the impact of group stereotypes on social policy and service…

Abstract

The creation of the Commission for Equality and Human Rights presents a real opportunity to re‐assess the impact of group stereotypes on social policy and service delivery. This paper consider possible impacts of ageist stereotypes of older people on community safety thinking and delivery, including perceptions of older people's levels of fear of crime, risk of victimisation, and offending behaviour. It also explores possible associations between inter‐generational relationships and anti‐social behaviour, and how elder abuse is positioned in comparison to other forms of abuse and domestic violence.

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Julie Shaw

The purpose of this paper is to present and explore the findings of part of the author’s research study, an aim of which is to illuminate factors at policy, practice and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and explore the findings of part of the author’s research study, an aim of which is to illuminate factors at policy, practice and procedural levels that contribute to the criminalisation of children in residential care in England.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilises semi-structured interviews with children, young people, and professional adults in the care system.

Findings

Through analysis of the semi-structured interviews, the paper highlights how “system abuse” can contribute to poor outcomes, including involvement with the youth justice system.

Originality/value

The paper concludes by arguing that in order to successfully decrease criminalisation, it is necessary to employ an approach which, while acknowledging individual culpability, both recognises and focuses on the contribution of wider systemic failings.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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