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Abstract

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Anthony Dermer

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of national identity, as imparted to students by the Western Australia Education Department, in the early part of the twentieth…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of national identity, as imparted to students by the Western Australia Education Department, in the early part of the twentieth century. By specifically examining The School Paper, as a part of a broader investigation into the teaching of English, this paper interrogates the role “school papers” played in the formation of the citizen subject.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on all available editions of Western Australia’s Education Department school reader, The School Paper, between 1909 and 1911, and on the Department’s Education Circular publication between the years 1899 and 1911. These are read within the context of the prevailing education philosophy, internationally and domestically, and the extent to which it was shaped by Australia’s cultural heritage and the desire to establish a national identity in the years post-federation.

Findings

The School Paper featured stories, poems, songs and articles that complimented the goals of the new education. Used in supplement to a revised curriculum weighted towards English classics, The School Paper, provided an important site for citizenship training. This publication pursued dual projects of constructing a specific Australian identity while defining a British imperial identity from which it is informed.

Originality/value

This research builds on scholarship on the role of school readers in other states in the construction of national identity and the formation of the citizen subject. It is the first research conducted into Western Australia’s school paper, the school reader, and provides a new lens through which to view how the processes of national/imperial identities are carried out and influenced by state-sanctioned study of English.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 September 2009

Andy Mott, Paul Dobson, James Walton, Penny Highfield, Lee Harries, Robert Seal and Peter Butland

Since the early 1980s, breakaway training has been synonymous with many prevention and management of violence and aggression (PMVA) training programmes in social care and NHS…

Abstract

Since the early 1980s, breakaway training has been synonymous with many prevention and management of violence and aggression (PMVA) training programmes in social care and NHS settings. However, for almost three decades, this community has continued to accept a training approach that has been largely unsupported by a robust underpinning methodology or evidence base. The validity of this historical training approach will be examined in context with the available literature, and will seek to identify the fundamental flaws that have been inherent in the traditional system. This paper will conclude by making some practical suggestions on how the efficacy of personal protective training may be improved, based on the emerging findings from other scientific fields.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Andy Mott, James Walton, Lee Harries, Penny Highfield, Anthony Bleetman and Paul Dobson

This paper aims to examine the nature and prevalence of violence in a medium secure unit and to evaluate a personal defence training programme for staff working with mentally…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the nature and prevalence of violence in a medium secure unit and to evaluate a personal defence training programme for staff working with mentally disordered offenders.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies an existing training gap associated with traditional breakaway techniques and describes a process of piloting a new educational module known as the spontaneous protection enabling accelerated response (SPEAR) system. Structured questionnaires were used to collect demographic data and analyse staff confidence and perceptions of the training module. Clinician confidence in coping with patient aggression was measured before, immediately after and at three months following participation in the new programme.

Findings

A significant change in staff confidence was observed at two time scales after the training had been administered when compared with the pre‐test baseline total scores. Over 90 per cent of staff either agreed or strongly agreed that training in the new personal defence module provided a credible defence against sudden episodes of high‐risk violence.

Originality/value

The paper describes a proposed module of training that may provide a credible tertiary strategy for those frontline clinicians currently exposed to the risk of sudden, spontaneous episodes of close proximity violence where traditional breakaway techniques are likely to be ineffective. This paper would interest managers, trainers and specialist practitioners that are involved in the preparation and delivery of violence reduction initiatives aimed at promoting safer and therapeutic services.

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1914

UP to the present the war strain has not had a great effect upon the libraries of this country. Issues have naturally fallen in some departments—particularly in districts where…

Abstract

UP to the present the war strain has not had a great effect upon the libraries of this country. Issues have naturally fallen in some departments—particularly in districts where there is a large floating population of aliens—but this has been counterbalanced by increased use in other directions. Many libraries have already been made the local headquarters of relief committees, special constabulary, the National Reserve, boy scouts' associations, etc., and as recruiting stations, and where there is sufficient accommodation, it is proper that the familiar library building should be so used for these emergency national affairs.

Details

New Library World, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1916

Middle October finds most libraries well settled into their winter work, and this winter will probably be the most unusual in the history of the public library movement, while it…

Abstract

Middle October finds most libraries well settled into their winter work, and this winter will probably be the most unusual in the history of the public library movement, while it will not be without its problems for every other description of library. Present indications lead us to believe that there will be no falling‐off of the demands of the civilian population; our libraries are crowded in the earlier part of the evenings, and unless some catastrophe intervenes of which we have at present no anticipation, this demand is not likely to fall much lower. Apart from their book work, some libraries may find it necessary to shear away their extension work in the shape of lectures and similar activities, mainly, of course, because of shortage of labour, but also because of the darkness of the streets at night. This latter difficulty is being met by some by moving the time of the lectures forward, and we think the plan has much to commend it. We hope, wherever they can, that librarians will maintain as many as possible of these activities “that show,” since they will keep the libraries before the public at a time when they are likely to be thought comparatively unimportant. There should be no acquiescence in the notion that libraries are luxuries, and that they have not a part of quiet but immense importance to play in the immediate future.

Details

New Library World, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Tua Bjorklund, Dhruv Bhatli and Miko Laakso

Innovations lie at the heart of both entrepreneurship and marketing. While research has long focused on the idea generation phase at the beginning of the innovation process, ideas…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovations lie at the heart of both entrepreneurship and marketing. While research has long focused on the idea generation phase at the beginning of the innovation process, ideas need to subsequently be realized through efforts in idea development and implementation. This paper aims to study the antecedents and practices of idea advancement behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven product developers of an international company were interviewed in-depth based on a critical incident technique.

Findings

Idea advancement behavior was found to be distributed in time and between people, pervasive in the development process. Antecedents for efforts were identified at personal, interpersonal and work organization levels. Although personal antecedents were most numerous, interpersonal and work organization antecedents distinguished successful and unsuccessful efforts. Key idea advancement behaviors were centered on the inclusion of others and communication channel choices.

Research limitations/implications

The current study offers a complementary micro-level point-of-view to championship literature, illustrating the situated and dispersed nature of everyday advancement efforts as opposed to the dominant depictions of heroic relentless championing individuals. However, as the study was conducted in a single company, the findings still need to be validated in more varied settings.

Practical implications

The results highlight the need for supporting idea advancement behavior across organizational levels and function, instead of focusing on identifying individual champions. Time management, supporting switches in the driving force, and communicating value are necessary for sustaining advancement efforts.

Originality/value

Idea advancement practices have been largely ignored in previous innovation literature, with the exception of systematic processes and championing. This paper explores idea advancement as a commonplace proactive behavior, revealing several levels of key antecedents for successfully advancing ideas into innovations.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

J. Keith Murnighan, Linda Babcock, Leigh Thompson and Madan Pillutla

This paper investigates the information dilemma in negotiations: if negotiators reveal information about their priorities and preferences, more efficient agreements may be reached…

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Abstract

This paper investigates the information dilemma in negotiations: if negotiators reveal information about their priorities and preferences, more efficient agreements may be reached but the shared information may be used strategically by the other negotiator, to the revealers' disadvantage. We present a theoretical model that focuses on the characteristics of the negotiators, the structure of the negotiation, and the available incentives; it predicts that experienced negotiators will out‐perform naive negotiators on distributive (competitive) tasks, especially when they have information about their counterpart's preferences and the incentives are high—unless the task is primarily integrative, in which case information will contribute to the negotiators maximizing joint gain. Two experiments (one small, one large) showed that the revelation of one's preferences was costly and that experienced negotialors outperformed their naive counterparts by a wide margin, particularly when the task and issues were distributive and incentives were large. Our results help to identify the underlying dynamics of the information dilemma and lead to a discussion of the connections between information and social dilemmas and the potential for avoiding inefficiencies.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1936

There is much to justify the old “ saw ” that what is one man's food may be another man's poison. Even among healthy individuals this holds true; and it is explained by a…

Abstract

There is much to justify the old “ saw ” that what is one man's food may be another man's poison. Even among healthy individuals this holds true; and it is explained by a peculiarity of constitution attaching to some individuals that may be termed, in non‐technical language, idiosyncrasy.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Donald Hawes

159

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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