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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Patriya Tansuhaj, James W. Gentry, Joby John, L. Lee Manzer and Bong Jin Cho

Do consumers in countries that differ widely in cultural values andin economic development also differ in their resistance to innovations?And, if so, why? Addressing these…

Abstract

Do consumers in countries that differ widely in cultural values and in economic development also differ in their resistance to innovations? And, if so, why? Addressing these questions will help international marketing managers formulate an appropriate strategy for a successful product introduction in diverse foreign markets. In this five‐country study, the cultural values of fatalism, traditionalism, and religious commitment were found to explain cross‐cultural variation in innovation resistance in Senegal and in the United States, but not in India, South Korea, or Thailand. Even though the results were different for every country, fatalism was generally associated with less willingness to try new non‐technical products and with higher levels of perceived product risk. Differences were found to be related to entertainment and media innovations as opposed to technical or fashion‐oriented innovations. The results do not support the contention that a global, standardised marketing strategy may be appropriate for the introduction of new products in foreign markets.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Robert L. Harrison, Ann Veeck and James W. Gentry

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to describe and evaluate the life grid as a methodology for historical research; and to provide an example application investigating the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to describe and evaluate the life grid as a methodology for historical research; and to provide an example application investigating the dynamics of family meals over a lifetime by pairing life course theory with the life grid method of obtaining oral histories.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore how the meanings and processes of meals change, the authors conducted interviews with 15 respondents aged 80 years old and over, on the topic of family meals.

Findings

The paper discusses the merits of using the life grid method to analyze lifetime family consumption behavior. The findings of this example study provide insight as to how the roles, responsibilities, and loyalties of our participants had changed through births, deaths, marriages, wars, economic periods, illnesses, and the process of aging, leading to changes in dining.

Originality/value

The benefit of the life grid method described in this paper is its ability to minimize recall bias. In addition, the overt process of cross‐referencing events throughout the course of the interviews via the life grid method proved to be a helpful aid in identifying patterns and symmetries during the interpretation stage.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Marko Grünhagen, Stephen J. Grove and James W. Gentry

Americans who travel internationally are often shocked to discover retail outlets closed during weekend and evening hours in cities such as Paris, Rome and Berlin. Based on the…

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Abstract

Americans who travel internationally are often shocked to discover retail outlets closed during weekend and evening hours in cities such as Paris, Rome and Berlin. Based on the implicit assumption that demand clearly exists, retailers at various locations throughout the globe have increased their hours of operation. While political debate regarding a variety of issues (costs, the rights of labor, religion, etc.) often rages, there has been an implicit assumption that latent demand for longer hours of operations exists. This study investigates through a longitudinal examination consumer perceptions of Saturday shopping in a country where such an activity was previously restricted. Specifically, studies perceptions of Saturday shopping among a sample of German college students who were raised with limited Saturday shopping hours. Data were gathered in 1996 – the year German legislation allowed expanded hours for retailers – and again in 1999, and comparisons are made. Strong differences are found between consumer attitudes towards Saturday shopping at the time of expansion and three years later, indicating the need for differentiating retail strategies in Germany and in other parts of the world that may soon be providing similar expanded retail access.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Greg Broekemier, Ray Marquardt and James W. Gentry

The purpose of this paper is to determine which two dimensions of music, happy/sad or liked/disliked, have significant effects on shopping intentions, thereby providing guidance…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine which two dimensions of music, happy/sad or liked/disliked, have significant effects on shopping intentions, thereby providing guidance for decision‐makers in service environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjects viewed videotapes of an unfamiliar store in an experimental research design. Subjects were exposed to one of several musical treatments while viewing and were asked to speak their thoughts about the store aloud. Happy/sad musical treatments were determined through pretests while subjects' unprompted comments were used to assess like/dislike for the music. Subjects also reported intentions to shop in the stimulus store. The hypothesized model was then tested.

Findings

Happy/sad music had a significant direct effect on shopping intentions while the direct effect of liked/disliked music was marginally significant. However, the combination of the two music dimensions investigated is perhaps most noteworthy. Shopping intentions were greatest when subjects were exposed to happy music that was liked.

Research limitations/implications

Only a women's clothing store service setting with a limited target market was utilized. Care should be taken when generalizing beyond this setting and subject group.

Practical implications

Happy music that is liked by the target market can significantly increase intentions to shop in a retail service environment.

Originality/value

Little research has been done investigating the effects of the affective, or happy/sad, component of music in service settings. This study helps fill that gap in the literature. In addition, studies investigating music's effects in retail environments often examine only one dimension of music. The value of assessing effects of multiple dimensions of music is demonstrated.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Ann Veeck, Fang Grace Yu, Hongyan Yu, Gregory Veeck and James W. Gentry

– This study aims to examine the major influences of food choices of Chinese teenagers within a dynamic food marketing environment.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the major influences of food choices of Chinese teenagers within a dynamic food marketing environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports findings from semi-structured interviews with high school students which examine teenagers’ guidelines for selecting food, along with their actual eating behavior.

Findings

The results reflect on how four major influences – personal, family, peer and retailer – may intersect to affect the eating behaviors of Chinese adolescents, as they navigate an intense education schedule during a time of rapidly changing cultural values. Different norms of food choice – nutrition, food safety, taste, body image, price, convenience, sharing, friendship and fun – are evoked according to the social context and concurrent activities of the teenagers.

Social implications

The findings offer tentative insights related to the potential for promoting healthier eating habits for adolescents in urban areas of China.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates how, within this rapidly changing food environment, food retailers are creating alliances with teenagers to meet needs of convenience, speed, taste and social interaction.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

William E. Warren, C.L. Abercrombie and Robert L. Berl

Reviews the findings of a study investigating the adoption of aservice innovation and the relative importance to consumers in makingthe adoption decision. Suggests managerial…

Abstract

Reviews the findings of a study investigating the adoption of a service innovation and the relative importance to consumers in making the adoption decision. Suggests managerial implications and recommendations as a result of the study. Identifies other service industries to which the implications could be relevant. Includes an appendix describing the methodology of the study.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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