Search results

1 – 10 of over 8000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2018

Lauren L. Rich, James Rich and Joe Hair

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a model of organizational culture capable of more strongly predicting individual work behavior. For this purpose, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a model of organizational culture capable of more strongly predicting individual work behavior. For this purpose, the authors integrate the organizational culture profile (OCP) with two independent theories – regulatory focus theory and the theory of basic values.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected from 22 US public accounting firms. Partial least squares confirmatory composite analysis was used to test the theoretical structure and measurement metrics of the proposed factors.

Findings

The results support that the influence of organizational culture can be conceptualized consistent with a regulatory focus framework. The findings of our research indicate that promotion-focused culture is distinct from prevention-focused culture.

Practical implications

The results raise questions about the common practice across existing person-organization fit research of expecting generic effects across all seven OCP dimensions when predicting individual behaviors. Moreover, empirical evidence for the separate higher-order cultural dimensions supports the conclusion that the OCP’s seven dimensions reflect different underlying motivations likely important in predicting individual work behavior.

Originality/value

This study is the first to not only provide a confirmatory composite analysis of the measure of culture based on the OCP’s original seven cultural dimensions, but also examine the motivational properties of organizational culture through a regulatory focus framework.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1992

John E. Elliott

Illustrates and explicates the proposition that the critique of exploitationand injustice found in contemporary Liberation Theology is theologicallygrounded, in that these…

Abstract

Illustrates and explicates the proposition that the critique of exploitation and injustice found in contemporary Liberation Theology is theologically grounded, in that these phenomena are rebuked as discordant with God′s will, as revealed by textual re‐examination of the Bible, notably the Old Testament, not merely as socially undesirable, by examination of four central themes: (1) the Old Testament characterization of God as hater of exploitation, lover of justice, and Liberator of the oppressed; (2) the Biblical depiction of the character and methods of oppression and exploitation and the identification of oppressors and oppressed; (3) the Old Testament model of stages in the liberative process and vision of a future society characterized by peace, freedom, justice, equality, community, and prosperity; (4) significant elements of continuity between Old and New Testament on these issues.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 19 no. 10/11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Keith Hollingsworth

In “Reinventing Entrepreneurial History,” Wadhwani and Lubinski (2017) encourage the study of legitimacy, the sense that a new organization or venture “belongs” to, or…

Abstract

Purpose

In “Reinventing Entrepreneurial History,” Wadhwani and Lubinski (2017) encourage the study of legitimacy, the sense that a new organization or venture “belongs” to, or fits within, the social construct of its time.

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, this query will consider methods used in the period between the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement to show legitimacy in black economic endeavors. Three Atlanta entrepreneurs’ efforts will be used as demonstrative examples.

Findings

The overarching aim of this investigation of economic legitimization is to give practical examples of three distinct strategies in play: endorsement, authorization and storytelling. In addition, a fourth external actor, social organizations, that exists outside of the realms of media, government and law as noted by Bitektine and Haack (2015) is illustrated to grant validity within the black community. Also, the storytelling strategy is used to illustrate promoters, actors pushing legitimacy to benefit the community at large.

Originality/value

Arguably the search for economic and collective legitimacy within black businesses is not confined to the past. Stated in another way, black businesses still fight for legitimacy, and future research should be undertaken to show the similarities and differences in the two aforementioned periods.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Santhi Hejeebu

The Royal African Company, the Hudson’s Bay Company, and the East India Company used both owned and hired ships in their seventeenth and eighteenth century trading…

Abstract

The Royal African Company, the Hudson’s Bay Company, and the East India Company used both owned and hired ships in their seventeenth and eighteenth century trading operations. Why such critical assets were sometimes owned and sometimes rented is explored. Contrary to economic reasoning, ship rentals occurred in shipping markets that were uncompetitive. The use of hired ships was correlated instead to market power in the companies’ selling or output markets. The pattern of ship ownership can be attributed to the close social proximity of shipowners to decision-makers in the companies. By modeling the input hiring decision while allowing for variation in the competitiveness of output markets, it is argued that rent-seeking behavior on the part of company insiders may explain the ownership patterns.

Details

Chartering Capitalism: Organizing Markets, States, and Publics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-093-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Scott T. Allison, James K. Beggan and Carolyn Clements

One reason for the severe short age of nurses is the un will ing ness of males to pursue the profession in great numbers. This article explores people’s negative…

Abstract

One reason for the severe short age of nurses is the un will ing ness of males to pursue the profession in great numbers. This article explores people’s negative stereotypic beliefs about males in the nursing profession. Participants were asked to provide evaluations and trait descriptions of both male and female nurses. The results revealed that both male and female participants harbored favorable impressions of female nurses but unfavorable impressions of male nurses. Male participants were especially likely to form negative evaluations of men who pursue the nursing profession. Exploratory multivariate analyses of trait descriptions revealed that male nurses are viewed as feminine, non traditional, intelligent, and caring. Additional results suggest that unfavorable stereo types of male nurses can be moderated by highlighting the masculine qualities of nurses’ job duties. Implications for the recruitment of males into nursing are discussed.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1916

In a recent article dealing with the crimes against humanity committed by Germany, The Daily Telegraph remarks that thousands of innocent men, women, and little children…

Abstract

In a recent article dealing with the crimes against humanity committed by Germany, The Daily Telegraph remarks that thousands of innocent men, women, and little children murdered in cold blood by airship and submarine appeal for vengeance. The acts of Germany from the early days of the war onwards have filled decent‐minded people with feelings of loathing, and it is well that the last bonds uniting the two nations should be severed. This is no ordinary war. It has cut a deep chasm between the British and German peoples. By every means in our power we must remove, root and branch, those enemy influences in our midst which, by a process of “peaceful penetration,” were undermining our social, financial, and industrial power.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Heidi Hanson and Zoe Stewart-Marshall

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 30 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Selina Keesoony

This paper aims to explore the underlying problem of tackling money laundering, namely, the difficulty of enforcing international laws and whether this is a problem which…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the underlying problem of tackling money laundering, namely, the difficulty of enforcing international laws and whether this is a problem which is too great to overcome in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A doctrinal approach is used to discuss international anti-money laundering (AML) laws and question whether money laundering can be truly regarded as an international crime. A comparative approach with case studies of corruption in financial institutions illustrates the problems which law enforcement might encounter. The advantages and disadvantages of tackling money laundering will be highlighted to elucidate both the negative impacts of the crime and the reasons why some states may not be tackling money laundering as forcefully as they could.

Findings

Uniformity of AML laws among different countries may deter criminals from laundering money. The ratification of the Vienna Convention can help to facilitate uniformity of legal rules. States need robust domestic laws to tackle money laundering. Money laundering is an international crime, although not always a specific crime in international law. Moreover, it is generally advantageous to consider money laundering to be a specific crime under international law.

Originality/value

The article questions the effectiveness of current AML laws by examining the foundations of international law. Suggestions as to how uniformity can be achieved are given. A comparative approach is also used to demonstrate the extent of the crime, weaknesses in companies’ regulatory regimes and how each State responds to money laundering. The comparison also reveals State-specific issues which fuel money laundering. Moreover, the article explores the practical and legal advantages and disadvantages of money laundering being considered a specific crime in international law.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Recently Bertie Everard, ICI Education and Training Manager, lectured on this subject at a Conference on ‘Mission in an Industrial and Technological Society’, which was…

Abstract

Recently Bertie Everard, ICI Education and Training Manager, lectured on this subject at a Conference on ‘Mission in an Industrial and Technological Society’, which was broadcast on BBC Radio Leeds. He shared the platform with Bill Gowland, President of the Methodist Conference and Principal of Luton Industrial College, with the Bishop of Ripon and with Bob Clemmett who stood in for the General Secretary of the TUC (Len Murray being otherwise engaged with the steel strike). He makes no claim to speak for Christian managers in general, or ICI managers in particular — only for himself. What he said takes up some of the themes on which John Wellens has written in this journal, and which, he acknowledges, inspired part of his argument.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1979

Clive Bingley, Sarah Lawson, Edwin Fleming and Kate Hills

AS FAIRLY WARNED to you earlier this year would transpire, what you are now reading is the 100th issue of NEW LIBRARY WORLD, a span of issues which has encompassed some 8…

Abstract

AS FAIRLY WARNED to you earlier this year would transpire, what you are now reading is the 100th issue of NEW LIBRARY WORLD, a span of issues which has encompassed some 8½ years, several million words, a sizeable copse of trees to produce the paper on which those issues have been printed.

Details

New Library World, vol. 80 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

1 – 10 of over 8000