Search results

1 – 10 of over 7000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Martin Fojt

The key to any successful organization must be its communication network. Bold statement, but is it true? It is, of course, a sweeping generalization and one with which…

Abstract

The key to any successful organization must be its communication network. Bold statement, but is it true? It is, of course, a sweeping generalization and one with which anyone would have difficulty in picking an argument. One way to determine what is, and what is not, vital to your organization is by eliminating it from the equation and asking yourself where you would be without it. Do away with your communication system, apart from the most basic, and see what you are left with? If the answer is not a great deal, then you can, it is hoped, appreciate the importance of what you have, and realize the attention it deserves. Taking things for granted is an all too common phenomenon.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1989

Larry W. Emmelhainz and James R. Stock

Logistics and related journals typically are oriented towards twoaudiences: practitioners and/or educators. This article examinespractitioner and educator perceptions of…

Abstract

Logistics and related journals typically are oriented towards two audiences: practitioners and/or educators. This article examines practitioner and educator perceptions of logistics and related journals. Comparisons are made among the various journals both with each other and with the perceived ideal characteristics of logistics journals. While differences were found to exist between the academics and practitioners, the overall perceptions were surprisingly similar.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 19 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

James R. Stock and Douglas M. Lambert

World business, multinational company, and world enterprise are all terms being used with more frequency as a significantly larger number of businesses become…

Abstract

World business, multinational company, and world enterprise are all terms being used with more frequency as a significantly larger number of businesses become international both in philosophy and in scope of operations. For a continually growing number of firms, the entire world is considered a marketplace for their products.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

James R. Stock

As business approaches the next century,numerous challenges and opportunities will befaced by logistics practitioners and academicians.New and expanded perpectives…

Abstract

As business approaches the next century, numerous challenges and opportunities will be faced by logistics practitioners and academicians. New and expanded perpectives, coupled with the traditional concepts, will have to be blended. One perspective, and certainly not the only one, is presented. It is argued that people in logistics have generally taken a limited view of the discipline. If the area is to achieve the level of importance prophesised for it, academicians and practitioners will have to take a much broader and pervasive view of what logistics is and what it could become. Some questions are posed to those involved in the logistics process.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1978

James R. Stock

The distribution sector has been hard hit by the energy/ecology crisis. Higher fuel costs coupled with reduced availability of many energy sources have adversely affected

Abstract

The distribution sector has been hard hit by the energy/ecology crisis. Higher fuel costs coupled with reduced availability of many energy sources have adversely affected distribution activities. Growing levels of pollution have caused global concern. As a part of the physical distribution activity, the transportation modes have been particularly vulnerable to the energy/ecology crisis because they rely so heavily on energy resources. It is important that those involved in physical distribution understand the distribution‐energy/ecology interface. Recognition of the effects that the energy/ecology crisis has had, and will have, on distribution is an integral part of logistics planning and control. The energy/ecology crisis will not go away and it behoves the physical distribution manager, educator and public policy maker to: (1) Understand the Problem, (2) Recognise how the problem pertains to him directly and/or indirectly, and (3) Determine how he and others will react to the problem in the future.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

James R. Stock

Reviews a book focused on green marketing management, weak on itslogistical implications; and a journal article looking at servicequality in the transportation industry.

Abstract

Reviews a book focused on green marketing management, weak on its logistical implications; and a journal article looking at service quality in the transportation industry.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1978

Douglas M. Lambert, James F. Robeson and James R. Stock

The notion that a firm's total costs could be reduced, customer service improved, and interdepartmental conflicts substantially reduced if distribution activities were

Abstract

The notion that a firm's total costs could be reduced, customer service improved, and interdepartmental conflicts substantially reduced if distribution activities were more closely co‐ordinated and centrally programmed, has emerged as an important concept in physical distribution and marketing. This concept has become known as “integrated physical distribution management” and has attracted the interest of practitioners and academicians alike. The National Council of Physical Distribution, an association of more than 2,000 distribution executives and educators, defines physical distribution management as: “Physical distribution management is the term describing the integration of two or more activities for the purpose of planning, implementing and controlling the efficient flow of raw materials, in‐process inventory and finished goods from point of origin to point of consumption. These activities may include, but are not limited to, customer service, demand forecasting, distribution communications, inventory control, material handling, order processing, parts and service support, plant and warehouse site selection, procurement, packaging, return goods handling, salvage and scrap disposal, traffic and transportation, and warehousing and storage.” NCPDM Revised Version—1976 This concept of tying together a number of distribution activities and viewing the result as a system represents an “integration” of the traditionally fragmented physical distribution management function.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

James R. Stock and Douglas M. Lambert

A “world class” organization must provide high levels of logistics service quality to customers. Knowledge of customer expectations and an understanding of the firm's…

Abstract

A “world class” organization must provide high levels of logistics service quality to customers. Knowledge of customer expectations and an understanding of the firm's performance on logistics service attributes relative to competitors are vital to achieving service excellence. Research studies in four industries identify the most important logistics service attributes in business‐to‐business settings. There is consistency across industries in terms of the attributes considered most important by customers. Typically, vendors within an industry do not perform up to customer expectations, which provides the opportunity for a firm to gain a competitive advantage over industry rivals.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

James R. Stock

Proposes that the discipline of logistics can benefit from borrowing theories from other areas of study. Presents examples of theories from other disciplines that have…

Abstract

Proposes that the discipline of logistics can benefit from borrowing theories from other areas of study. Presents examples of theories from other disciplines that have already been applied to logistics issues. Offers potential applications from a variety of non‐logistics disciplines, including accounting, anthropology and sociology, computing, economics, marketing, philosophy, political science, and psychology. Discusses examples from various disciplines in some detail and identifies some possible applications of the theory. Concludes with a discussion of the benefits of “borrowing” non‐logistics theories to logistics research, practice and theory development.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 7000