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Article

James Powell and Geoff Wicken

Compares the findings from the Youth Target Group Index (TGI) Survey of British children with those from the Simmonds Kids and Teens survey in the USA, with implications…

Abstract

Compares the findings from the Youth Target Group Index (TGI) Survey of British children with those from the Simmonds Kids and Teens survey in the USA, with implications for marketers. Concludes that the two countries’ youth undeniably share a sophisticated common culture, with most but not all influences coming from the USA, and that there is as a result considerable scope for marketers of goods such as sportswear and web‐based activities; differences between the youth in the two countries include a greater degree of independence among American than British children aged 7 to 10, with somewhat higher mobile phone ownership.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article

John Davies, Mick Hides and James Powell

This paper focuses on the theme of entrepreneurship education, learning and development and specifically, on the challenge for higher education institutions (HEIs) of…

Abstract

This paper focuses on the theme of entrepreneurship education, learning and development and specifically, on the challenge for higher education institutions (HEIs) of supporting entrepreneurial and enterprising individuals and organisations. This is examined from the perspective of the definition of appropriate development needs of entrepreneurs in small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). HEIs are undergoing a phenomenal amount of change driven by the various stakeholders (e.g. government, students and local committees). The government continues to emphasise the importance to the economy of the set up and development of SMEs. If this is to happen then SMEs will need support in developing entrepreneurial and enterprising individuals. This convergence of needs presents the opportunity for HEIs to contribute to this support. A prerequisite for this support is the definition of the development needs of entrepreneurs in SMEs.

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Education + Training, vol. 44 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

James Powell, Carol Hoover, Andrew Gordon and Michelle Mittrach

The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation and impact of a locally customized Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCiD) profile wizard. It also provides…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation and impact of a locally customized Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCiD) profile wizard. It also provides a broader context for adopting ORCiD as an identity and single sign-on solution.

Design/methodology/approach

A custom web application was designed by a library team and implemented using a combination of the OAuth protocol and the ORCiD web services API. The tool leveraged a rich, curated set of local publication data, and exposed integration hooks that allowed other enterprise systems to connect ORCiD IDs with an internal employee identifier.

Findings

Initially the tool saw only modest use. Ultimately its success depended upon integration with other enterprise systems and the requirement of an ORCiD ID for internal funding requests, rather than exclusively on the merits of the tool. Since introduction, it has been used to generate over 1,660 ORCiDs from a population of 4,000 actively publishing researchers.

Practical implications

Organizations that desire to track publications by many affiliated authors would likely benefit from some sort of integration with ORCiD web services. This is particularly true for organizations that have many publishing researchers and/or track publications spanning many decades. Enterprise integration is crucial to the success of such a project.

Originality/value

Research inputs and research products are now primarily digital objects. So having a reliable system for associating researchers with their output is a big challenge that, if solved, could increase researcher impact and enhance digital scholarship. ORCiD IDs are a potential glue for many aspects of this problem. The design and implementation of the wizard eased and quickened adoption of ORCiD Ids by local researchers due in part to the ease with which a researcher can push publication information already held by the library to their profile. Subsequent integration of researcher ORCiD IDs with local enterprise systems has enabled real-time propagation of ORCiD IDs across research proposal workflow, publication review and content discovery systems.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article

Aguinaldo Santos, James Andrew Powell and Carlos Torres Formoso

An effective way to promote a continuous flow of ideas for improvement in production systems is to challenge people with “stretch targets”. This should generate a creative…

Abstract

An effective way to promote a continuous flow of ideas for improvement in production systems is to challenge people with “stretch targets”. This should generate a creative tension between a desired situation and the present situation. In the UK, the potential of this approach has been recognised by the Construction Task Force in their report, Rethinking Construction, which recommended that construction companies should establish challenging targets for improving the quality and efficiency of their processes. Investigates to what extent construction companies are currently using targets for driving continuous improvement in their production processes. The analysis is based on the empirical evidence collected on six Brazilian and UK construction sites. The analysis shows that most construction managers in the case studies did not use “stretch targets” as a strategy for driving continuous improvement in construction processes. “Stretch targets” were generally contingent to project constraints and were not supported by other fundamental complementary practices.

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Work Study, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article

Aguinaldo Santos and James Alfred Powell

“Push learning” in construction management happens when learners have little or no power in defining the problem, action or knowledge that is required to improve their own…

Abstract

“Push learning” in construction management happens when learners have little or no power in defining the problem, action or knowledge that is required to improve their own working environment or process. In the “pull learning” situation, people working in construction are in charge of learning for themselves by exploring their actions as they work. This paper presents a case study that investigated the use of these learning strategies in the creation of a “learning mood” within a medium sized contractor towards modern production principles. The results showed clear indications that the creation of an effective “learning mood” in construction is more likely to happen in a supportive environment characterised by “pull learning”. However, “push learning” proved very useful in provoking the initial reflection that triggered “pull learning”. Therefore, a balanced approach between “push” and “pull” learning seems the best way to introduce changes in construction organisations searching for improvement and innovations.

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article

Steven F. Vincent

In the past 50 years, numerous reference books have been written on the subjects of medieval history, art, literature, and philosophy. Steven F. Vincent provides a guide…

Abstract

In the past 50 years, numerous reference books have been written on the subjects of medieval history, art, literature, and philosophy. Steven F. Vincent provides a guide to selecting modern, as well as standard, sources of information on the Middle Ages.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

James Powell

Society now expects the universities it funds to work with citizens and communities to enable them to flourish in sustainable ways. One particular aspect of this concerns…

Abstract

Purpose

Society now expects the universities it funds to work with citizens and communities to enable them to flourish in sustainable ways. One particular aspect of this concerns support for small and medium sized businesses (SMEs) which, more than ever, need universities to help them cost effectively be innovative, and at the leading edge, for markets which are now global in outreach. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the kinds of approach and leadership that academics must put into their academic practices, in order to creatively and constructively lead local partnerships – partnerships that will be both successful and sustainable.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 185 rigorous cases studies were undertaken of successful university outreach activity in 30 universities across Europe. Senior staff of those universities used their collective judgment to determine the 16 “best leaders” of these projects in terms of entrepreneurial skills and wealth‐creating impacts. These leaders were then thematically interviewed and videoed, and their immediate staff indicated what leadership characteristics best described them. All data were content analysed. Then the best practice approaches, which actually helped SMEs, were elicited and the qualities of the 16 leaders were revealed.

Findings

Best practice projects, from all studied, clearly showed a “virtuous knowledge sharing” cycle, where holistic and co‐creating inter‐disciplinary team‐working was the norm. Teams of academics and SME partners in these projects worked extremely closely together to co‐produce “real world” solutions. While often “reluctant leaders”, the academics who normally drove these entrepreneurial projects to success had all of the characteristics often ascribed to leaders, as described in the general leadership literature. However, in the case of these university reach‐out leaders, these entrepreneurial academics had a particular focus in striving to be “democratically empowering”; their aspiration was to ensure innovative skills were successfully passed onto others in their teams, including their external partners, to enable powerful and collective co‐creation.

Social implications

This paper has profound social implications, especially in our present global financial extreme, as it focuses on the kinds of leadership that academics should put into practice in order to work more creatively and effectively with local SME partnerships. The approach has also shown how such leadership can also lead to successful social enterprises in their own right.

Originality/value

The working of universities with SMEs is very much a Cinderella area in higher education research. The approach described in this paper deals with this topic in an evidential and highly innovative way. It uniquely heralds, and describes in some detail, a new kind of university which strives to co‐identify problems worthy of exploration with local partners, the kind of co‐learning that engenders co‐creation and co‐design, and also the co‐production with local SMEs that can lead them to survive and to flourish. This has recently been recognized by the PASCAL International Observatory for place management, social capital and learning regions, which has adopted the approach in its “Universities for a Modern Renaissance programme”.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article

James E. Rush

Librarians have been concerned about the long‐term success of library automation vendors, and their concerns have been confirmed by the decline and fall of a number of…

Abstract

Librarians have been concerned about the long‐term success of library automation vendors, and their concerns have been confirmed by the decline and fall of a number of library system vendors, or, at least, by the demise of their products. This paper is an attempt to document the history of events in the library automation marketplace, and to put these events into meaningful business perspective. Among the issues examined here are: a) Who are the players? b) How can vendors be characterized? c) How do these characteristics reflect present and future success in the marketplace? d) How can the marketplace be characterized? e) How do these characteristics influence the success or failure of vendors? f) Is current success of a vendor indicative of a good product, of sound management, of customer satisfaction, and of future success? g) How, in fact, is success measured? h) Are there quantitative measures that can be applied to estimate the likely future success of a vendor?

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article

Caroline L. Davey, James A. Powell, Ian Cooper and Jennifer E. Powell

Action learning is intended to enable a group of professionals (a SET) to tackle work problems, develop solutions and reflect upon the success and failure of their…

Abstract

Action learning is intended to enable a group of professionals (a SET) to tackle work problems, develop solutions and reflect upon the success and failure of their actions. As part of the UK construction industry's drive to improve learning and performance, four SETs of small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) were established. This paper evaluates the capacity of action learning to promote innovation and use of technologies within a CIOB‐funded SET located in Watford. Construction companies were unable to address real problems related to their day‐to‐day activities due to competition. Instead, they identified an industry‐wide issue – a lack of quality recruits – and marshalled resources to provide better careers advice and promote opportunities for builders. The role of action learning in empowering construction SMEs to contribute to industry change programmes is explored.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

James Powell

Here I pay tribute to Gordon Pask who through only a small intervention changed the whole nature of the way I undertook my future studies.

Abstract

Here I pay tribute to Gordon Pask who through only a small intervention changed the whole nature of the way I undertook my future studies.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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