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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

James P. Neelankavil

Focuses on the training practices of Japanese firms and explains,in part, some of the phenomenal successes of their global and domesticoperations. Relevant information was…

Abstract

Focuses on the training practices of Japanese firms and explains, in part, some of the phenomenal successes of their global and domestic operations. Relevant information was gathered by a survey questionnaire from 110 Japanese managers working in Japan (in ten manufacturing and ten service companies). It appears that Japanese firms pay considerable attention to the training of managers. Training is used not only to improve function skills but also to prepare the managers for future assignments. In addition, training is viewed by the Japanese as a means to improve work and to improve retention of managers.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III…

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11138

Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

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Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

James P. Neelankavil

Changing remuneration practices and methods are issues that advertising agencies are facing. Fixed commission of around 15 per cent was the traditional practice but fee or…

Abstract

Changing remuneration practices and methods are issues that advertising agencies are facing. Fixed commission of around 15 per cent was the traditional practice but fee or cost‐based methods are becoming more common. The article investigates the prevalent advertising agency remuneration patterns in various countries; the frequency of their use, the initiators of policy change (wherever it has occurred) including the role of governments, and finally, trends in agency compensation.

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Management Research News, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Sandipa Dublish

Examines the issue of how variations in language used in advertising affect advertising preference with a sample of bilingual, Korean Americans. Uses past literature to…

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1487

Abstract

Examines the issue of how variations in language used in advertising affect advertising preference with a sample of bilingual, Korean Americans. Uses past literature to hypothesise that the level of acculturation would moderate ethnic consumers’ preference for advertisements in English versus their native language. Extends previous research in the field of ethnic advertising by considering whether findings from studies conducted with Hispanic American consumers are applicable to Asian Americans. Shows that no significant differences were detected in bilingual Korean American preferences for advertisements in which the message was presented in English as compared with those that used Humgul (Korean language) to communicate with the audience. Concludes with suggestions for further research.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Mahesh Chandra and James P. Neelankavil

Between the lack of incentives for larger international companies and the lack of resources of the local companies the majority of the people in less developed countries…

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9438

Abstract

Purpose

Between the lack of incentives for larger international companies and the lack of resources of the local companies the majority of the people in less developed countries never benefit from new products. International companies generally offer modified product offerings to consumers in developing countries. To date, their attempts to penetrate the developing country markets have not been successful. The reasons for this failure in their attempts to succeed in these markets include the prohibitive cost of developing entirely new products for this market and the low‐income levels of the families in these countries. To succeed in developing countries, international companies have to observe and study their customers' needs and uncover the problem areas. There are many approaches available to accomplish this process including systematic innovation and the seven R's. Each approach focuses on the consumer and suggests a radical approach to developing new products. The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction and overview of new product development in emerging countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Challenges, process, and success strategies are explored.

Findings

To succeed in developing countries, international companies have to observe and study their customers' needs and uncover the problem areas. The authors suggest an approach that focuses on the consumer and suggests a radical approach to developing new products – the limitations/constraints point of view. The single biggest constraint in developing products for less developed countries is affordability (price). Unlike the new product development process that is practiced in industrialized countries, international companies wanting to be successful in less developed countries should start with the customers' affordability and value‐added point of view and then work backwards to develop products/services for these countries.

Practical implications

International companies are provided with an approach to new product development in emerging countries.

Originality/value

New product development in emerging countries is likely to become increasingly important, and there is very little research on the topic. The value of this paper is in its overview of the challenges of new product development in emerging countries, and suggested solutions.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Yong Zhang and James P. Neelankavil

Presents findings from an empirical study which investigates the effects of different advertising appeals used across cultures. Cultural differences along the…

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14794

Abstract

Presents findings from an empirical study which investigates the effects of different advertising appeals used across cultures. Cultural differences along the individualism‐collectivism dimension are hypothesized to affect people’s reactions to certain advertising appeals. Results indicate that appeals which emphasize individualistic benefits are more effective in the USA than in China. When appeals emphasizing collectivistic benefits are employed, they are generally more effective in China. However, such effects can be moderated by product characteristics. Different product types may serve to influence the effectiveness of culturally‐congruent advertising appeals. Discusses the implications of the findings.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Songpol Kulviwat, Gordon C. Bruner II and James P. Neelankavil

This paper aims to examine whether self-efficacy plays an important role in shaping the effect of cognition and affects in high technology adoption. It also examines…

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1960

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether self-efficacy plays an important role in shaping the effect of cognition and affects in high technology adoption. It also examines whether cognition and affect mediate the effect of self-efficacy on attitude toward adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an experimental survey to collect data, subjects performed two different tasks (utilitarian and hedonic) to make sure that they had cognitive and affective experiences to draw upon as they developed attitudes toward the focal innovation. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the model.

Findings

The result shows that self-efficacy influenced cognitive perceptions and emotional reactions. Specifically, self-efficacy was found to play a substantive role in shaping individuals’ attitudes via a cognitive route (perceived usefulness and ease-of-use) and an affective one (pleasure, arousal and dominance).

Research limitations/implications

The study of self-efficacy as an external variable provides further insights into the process and is expected to increase the explained variance of the theoretical model.

Practical implications

This study confirms that a belief about something besides the product also plays a key role; it is the confidence consumers have in their own abilities to understand and effectively use a new piece of technology.

Originality/value

The research makes important contributions to our understanding of technology acceptance and has implications for marketing managers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

James P. Neelankavil and Debra R. Comer

To derive and apply a new composite performance metric to top performing US companies in order to identify consistently excellent performers and explain their success over…

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1991

Abstract

Purpose

To derive and apply a new composite performance metric to top performing US companies in order to identify consistently excellent performers and explain their success over the last half‐century. The ten firms topping the list for this new composite performance metric represent the “best of the best” of American corporations during the fifty‐one years of Fortune magazine listings.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this analysis were gleaned from the annual lists of the top 500 companies reported by Fortune from 1954 to 2005. Using Fortune's annual rankings of companies according to the four performance criteria of return on investment/equity, net profits, total assets, and revenues dimensions, the authors firstly computed, for each of these four performance dimensions, an average ranking based on a company's particular rank each year and its total number of appearances during the 51‐year period; and then, secondly, by assigning each of the four performance criteria a weight reflecting its importance, derived a composite (total) score based on a company's average ranking on all four criteria.

Findings

For a modern US based company to be successful year after year it must consistently achieve two of four performance criteria included in the composite metric. The results of the longitudinal analysis illustrate the significance of using a variety of metrics, or a composite metric, to gauge corporate performance.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the findings are that assigning different weights to the four performance criteria would yield a somewhat different composite ranking.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to derive and present a composite performance metric, compiled from Fortune's annual rankings of four critical performance variables and representing an aggregated weighted ranking of American companies over a half‐century.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

James P. Neelankavil, Venkatapparao Mummalaneni and David N. Sessions

The need for cultural sensitivity in global marketing is recognizedwidely. Using content analysis of 543 advertisements from four EastAsian countries, determines the…

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2598

Abstract

The need for cultural sensitivity in global marketing is recognized widely. Using content analysis of 543 advertisements from four East Asian countries, determines the marketing factors which lead to the use of two advertising strategies that might be perceived as culturally insensitive. Indicates that, while foreign languages are used widely, a substantial number of advertisements also employ western models. Shows the use of western models to be influenced by five factors: use of a foreign language, target audience, product′s country of origin, product type and customer country. Shows the use of foreign language words, on the other hand, to be influenced by just two factors: customer country and product type.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1994

James P. Neelankavil

Identifies problems facing MBA programmes, the type of executives soughtby businesses, and the roles academic and business institutions need toplay in developing the next…

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2498

Abstract

Identifies problems facing MBA programmes, the type of executives sought by businesses, and the roles academic and business institutions need to play in developing the next generation of managers. Views MBA programmes through an input‐output model with the quality of the output (MBAs) a function of the quality of the input and the efficiency of the process and reveals the problems in business education. To raise the quality of MBAs, schools need to cover material relevant to client firms, to incorporate new materials into existing courses that stress written and oral communication. States that faculty and executives should forge links to evaluate graduates and update classroom material and states faculty should be encouraged to undertake business internships. Corporations have an additional role, they must identify MBAs with potential for senior level management and train them, focusing on leadership negotiating skills, and long‐term planning.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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