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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2021

Millicent Adei Kotey, Faizal Adams, Fred Nimoh, James Osei Mensah, Seth Etuah and Coleman Edwin

To help address the problem of imperfections in the performance of cowpea markets in Ghana, the study sought to understand the costs and benefits associated with different…

Abstract

Purpose

To help address the problem of imperfections in the performance of cowpea markets in Ghana, the study sought to understand the costs and benefits associated with different market outlets and factors influencing farmers' choice of these outlets.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage sampling technique was adopted to collect data from 300 cowpea farmers through purposive sampling of communities and simple random selection at the farmer level in Ejura Sekyedumasi municipality of Ghana. Analytical methods including profitability measures such as gross margin, net margin, return on investment and multinomial logistic (MNL) regression model were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The results showed that production and marketing of cowpea is profitable with farmers who trade in wholesale markets recording the highest gross margin (Gh₵1245.85 (US$227.76)), net margin (Gh₵1029.37 (US$188.18)) and return on investment (ROI) of 63%. Important nonfarm-related factors including household size, farming experience, membership of farmer-based organization and extension contact were found to significantly influence the choice of marketing outlets in the study area. In addition, market attributes such as produce selling price, volume of cowpea sold and post-harvest value addition were also key determinants of cowpea market outlet choices.

Practical implications

The results of the study are vital to agricultural administrators in devising efficient cowpea market systems for smallholder farmers in Ghana. Likewise, the study provides important information to smallholder farmers in the choice of market outlets that maximizes their returns.

Originality/value

Previous studies on marketing of cowpea in Ghana emphasized on direct retail or consumer marketing to maximize farmers' returns. Meanwhile, there are claims to suggest that the sale of cowpea grains in the country are carried out through varied market outlets which come with differing costs and benefits implications for smallholder farmers. Therefore, the present study comprehensively compared associated costs and benefits in all available cowpea market outlets so as to settle the confusion surrounding most profitable and efficient marketing channel for smallholder farmers toward poverty reduction.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Bismark Amfo, James Osei Mensah and Robert Aidoo

Poor working conditions among migrant labourers on cocoa farms may be commonplace. This could affect labour productivity and cocoa industry performance. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Poor working conditions among migrant labourers on cocoa farms may be commonplace. This could affect labour productivity and cocoa industry performance. The paper investigates migrants' satisfaction with working conditions on cocoa farms in Ghana and the key drivers of satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a five-point Likert scale to evaluate migrants' satisfaction with remuneration, working hours, welfare, health and safety, contract and freedom. Using primary data from 400 migrants and non-migrants in four cocoa districts, multivariate probit regression was employed to evaluate the determinants of satisfaction with working conditions.

Findings

Migrant labourers are generally satisfied with their working hours, nature of contract and freedom they enjoy. However, they are unsatisfied with their remuneration, welfare and health/safety conditions on cocoa farms. All things being equal, secondary occupation, nature of contract, number of farmers served by labourer, annual earnings, farm ownership, education and expectations before migration influence migrants' satisfaction with working conditions.

Practical implications

To improve satisfaction with working conditions and productivity, migrants on cocoa farms should be given protective working gear, long-term or renewable contracts and they should be encouraged to engage in secondary occupations.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies that focussed on working conditions in the formal sector, this study explores migrants' satisfaction with working conditions in the informal agricultural sector. Also, the study examines labourers' satisfaction with six subcomponents of working conditions compared to previous studies that employed a univariate analytical approach to examine working conditions.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

James Osei Mensah, Kwasi Ohene-Yankyera and Robert Aidoo

Considering the fact that business management training has the potential to improve performance of micro and small enterprises, it is surprising why participation rates in…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering the fact that business management training has the potential to improve performance of micro and small enterprises, it is surprising why participation rates in most freely offered management training courses remain low. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors that determine an invitee’s decision to participate in a capacity building management training for street food entrepreneurs in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from a baseline survey, the study invited 314 street food entrepreneurs, selected through a stratified random technique from a list of 516 eligible food entrepreneurs. Training participants were invited to the programme through official invitation letters which were hand-delivered. Data on reasons for non-participation were collected either through phone interviews or on-site visit when a vendor could not be reached on phone. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise characteristics of vendors and businesses as well as reasons for non-participation while probit model was used to estimate determinants of participation.

Findings

The study found that whereas vendors with higher formal education better appreciate the benefits of education and training, their counterparts with fewer years of schooling do not. The latter’s perceived knowledge deficiencies appear to explain the difference in participation rates. Also, total workforce does not necessarily increase the probability of participation, especially when there are no trusted workers in the business who will take over critical activities such as handling of finances in the absence of the owner. The study also found that distance between vending premises and training centres had significant negative effects on vendors’ participation in the training programme.

Research limitations/implications

The external validity of the study findings and conclusions may not be limited to all informal sectors of the developing economies due to high degree of heterogeneity of the informal economy.

Originality/value

The study focusses on an informal sector in developing country dominated by women. The study focusses on understanding informal entrepreneurs’ response to formal training.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Bismark Amfo, James Osei Mensah, Ernest Baba Ali, Gilbert Dagunga, Seth Etuah and Robert Aidoo

This study investigates implications of crop and income diversifications on consumption expenditure (welfare) of rice-producing households in Ghana. It further compares…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates implications of crop and income diversifications on consumption expenditure (welfare) of rice-producing households in Ghana. It further compares diversification by three rice production systems: two-season rain-fed, two-season irrigated and one-season rain-fed rice production.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were sourced from 225 rice farmers. Margalef index and three-stage least-squares were employed.

Findings

Majority of rice-farming households in Ghana diversify livelihoods. The extent of livelihood diversification differs among two-season rain-fed, two-season irrigated and one-season rain-fed rice-producing households. Credit, distance to district capitals, production purpose and number of farming seasons influence crop and income diversifications, and consumption expenditure of rice-producing households. While crop diversification reduces consumption expenditure, income diversification increases it. Crop and income diversifications positively influence each other. Consumption expenditure reduces crop diversification but increases income diversification.

Practical implications

Policy should be directed towards the promotion of more livelihood activities to boost rice farmers' welfare. There should be awareness creation and training programmes to enable rice farmers realize different economic activities within and outside the agricultural value chain.

Originality/value

Crop and income diversifications were measured as continuous response variables, unlike previous studies that used a binary response variable. The authors established a synergy among crop and income diversifications, and consumption expenditure (welfare). The authors further compared crop and income diversifications by three rice production systems: two-season rain-fed, two-season irrigated and one-season rain-fed rice production systems.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

James Osei Mensah, Seth Etuah, Emmanuel Fiifi Musah, Frederick Botchwey, Loretta Oppong Adjei and Kofi Owusu

This study aims to analyse consumers' preferences for domestic chicken cut parts and the premium they are willing to pay for the various parts using data from a contingent…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse consumers' preferences for domestic chicken cut parts and the premium they are willing to pay for the various parts using data from a contingent valuation survey of individual chicken meat consumers in the Kumasi Metropolitan Area of Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The willingness to pay premiums are obtained using the double-bounded dichotomous choice approach. Determinants of the consumers' willingness to pay amounts are identified through a multivariate Tobit regression analysis.

Findings

The study finds that the wing is the most preferred chicken part by the consumers followed by the thighs. All consumers who express interest in a particular domestic chicken cut part are willing to pay a premium. Age, sex, years of formal education, household size and income level of the consumers as well as convenience, product availability and perceived wholesomeness of the product are identified as the key factors that influence the willingness to pay amounts.

Research limitations/implications

The findings and recommendations of this study could serve as a guide to domestic poultry meat producers and investors in Ghana and other developing countries on how to process or package the meat for the market or consumers. This could further contribute to policy formulation regarding the development of the domestic poultry meat industry.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of this study is seen in the contributions it makes to the literature on consumer preferences and willingness to pay for chicken cut parts from a developing country perspective where the market for these products is virtually non-existent.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

James Osei Mensah, Gorkem Copuroglu and Fred Appiah Fening

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of implementation of quality management in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of implementation of quality management in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

After thoroughly reviewing and reading available literatures in the field of interest, semi‐structured interview questions were prepared. Semi‐structured interview was opted for, in order to obtain in‐depth responses from the respondents. To cater for inter‐lingual differences and inconsistencies, a double translation of the completed interview questions was necessary.

Findings

It was revealed that awareness of quality management is relatively high among the Ghanaian multinational firms that have some degree of expatriate management and they performed fairly well. However, they still trail their international counterparts with similar top management commitment and resource base. On the other hand, the study revealed a low degree of quality awareness among firms owned and managed solely by Ghanaians and their performance, with the exception of long‐established and well‐resourced government enterprises, was poor.

Originality/value

The paper describes an exploratory study. The finding is that quality management practiced by Ghanaian firms (both multinationals and indigenous) is not a total approach and hence the conclusion is that total quality management, by implication, is not yet being practised in Ghana.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

E. Osei‐Tutu, E. Badu and D. Owusu‐Manu

While corruption has long been recognized as a destructive social problem, the subject has not yet been given much attention in the literature of the management of…

Abstract

Purpose

While corruption has long been recognized as a destructive social problem, the subject has not yet been given much attention in the literature of the management of procurement of infrastructure projects in Ghana. The purpose of this paper is to explore and discuss corruption practices inherent in public procurement of infrastructural projects in Ghana with the aim of identifying corruption related challenges that must be addressed in order to actualize the expected economic gains of infrastructural projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing extensively on existing literature and published data, the methodology adopted for the paper consisted of multi‐stage critical review of pertinent literature; review of 2007 Annual Report of the Public Procurement Authority and review of the Public Procurement Act, 2003 (Act 663). The study assumes value‐laden axiological philosophy, where the values and experiences of the authors provided the basis for the discussion.

Findings

Conflict of interest, bribery, embezzlement, kickbacks, tender manipulation and fraud are observed corruption practices in the Ghanaian infrastructure projects delivery system. The severity of corruption practices have intensified the search for more innovative means of delivering infrastructure projects that will achieve value for money. In the pursuit to control corruption practices, this would require constitution of a sound procurement system and pro‐social equity policies that would foster good governance, corporate social responsibility, transparency, accountability, judicious public expenditure and national progress. The Public Procurement Act 2003 (Act 663) is observed to proffer solutions for these underlying constructs but not without challenges.

Research limitations/implications

The nature of the research is review and explanatory without any empirical analysis to support the discussions and thus the results cannot be generalized on a broader context of public procurement practice in Ghana.

Practical implications

Implementation of sound procurement performance measurements would be imperative in the bid to curb corruption practices. The paper suggested a number of business approaches to combat corrupt practices in Ghana, which are explained in terms of political, psychological, technical, operational and retaliatory measures. In this paper, it is proposed that knowledge about and debating corruption related issues is just as important to the modern public procurement as are the abilities to creatively and logically introduce monitoring systems when planning, executing and completing projects.

Originality/value

The work is novel providing meaningful insights into conceptual basis for a detailed empirical analysis. Being a pioneering study, further research tailored to compare the extent of corruption practices in various sectors of the economy of Ghana would be novel.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-726-1

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

Michael Addy, Emmanuel Adinyira, James Cofie Danku and Florence Dadzoe

Developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa are faced with significant challenges as the economies continue to emerge. There is a huge infrastructural demand and various…

Abstract

Purpose

Developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa are faced with significant challenges as the economies continue to emerge. There is a huge infrastructural demand and various efforts to step up supply. Whilst stepping up the supply, the environmental concerns of these supplies require a lot of attention. With the need to reduce the environmental impact of buildings whilst promoting a green infrastructure, various studies have explored the obstacles to green building technology adoption. This study explores the impediments to the development of the green building market in sub-Saharan Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Using building consultants as the unit of analysis, this study explores the impediments using a structured survey questionnaire. The study area is Ghana, an emerging country in sub-Saharan Africa.

Findings

Key impediments to the development of the market is lack of awareness, lack of education and lack of fiscal incentives. The analysis shows that all the variables identified are significant in impeding the growth of the market. The results suggest that within the domain of developing countries, environmental issues may not be of immediate concern as economic issues take centre stage. For sustainability of the environment, it is unequivocal that dissemination of knowledge to key stakeholders be done.

Practical implications

Academic institutions and professional bodies have a pivotal role to play in raising awareness of green buildings. Governmental support such as various structures should be put in place to build up the local capacity of firms not only to compete with foreign counterparts but also to ensure innovative delivery of green buildings.

Originality/value

The paper presents contextual realities on the green market restrictions within developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa through a deeper understanding of market barriers and recommends pathways for stakeholders.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah, Ebenezer Afum, Carin Agnikpe, Jiaxin Cai, Esther Ahenkorah and Essel Dacosta

The desire for firms to gain competitive advantage and improve performance has resulted in the adoption of several practices. Green supply chain practices (GSCPs), just in…

Abstract

Purpose

The desire for firms to gain competitive advantage and improve performance has resulted in the adoption of several practices. Green supply chain practices (GSCPs), just in time (JIT) and total quality management (TQM) are some of the practices adopted by firms to improve operational performance (OP) and business performance (BP). This study examines the direct influence of GSCPs, JIT and TQM on operational performance and BP. The study further analyzes the synergy of GSCPs, JIT and TQM on OP and BP.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs the quantitative approach of research by using questionnaire to gather data from manufacturing managers and supply chain managers of 140 manufacturing firms in Ghana. The research uses partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS–SEM) to analyze the survey data.

Findings

The results of the analysis show that GSCPs, TQM and JIT positively influence both OP and BP. The findings reveal that GSCPs combine with JIT and TQM to improve OP and BP significantly. However, the synergy between green supply chain and TQM creates more value for both OP and BP than the synergy between GSCPs and JIT.

Originality/value

The study proposes a research model that examines both the individual and combined influence of GSCPs, TQM and JIT on both OP and BP from the developing country perspective. The study models GSCPs as an antecedent of JIT and TQM, which has not been explored.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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