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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

James M. Hulbert

Looks retrospectively at an article written by the author and his colleagues in 1975 and contributed to the Journal of Business Research. Concludes that the article is…

Abstract

Looks retrospectively at an article written by the author and his colleagues in 1975 and contributed to the Journal of Business Research. Concludes that the article is still relevant today, where information systems are still an important topic in the field of marketing.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 18 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Noel Capon, John U. Farley, James M. Hulbert and David Lei

The Peters and Waterman framework of eight management principles,focused largely on organisational design issues, is used to examinedifferences between 19 “excellent” and…

Abstract

The Peters and Waterman framework of eight management principles, focused largely on organisational design issues, is used to examine differences between 19 “excellent” and 50 “non‐excellent” firms. Data from large United States manufacturers show that the “excellent” companies earn higher returns on capital, have less variable returns and are more innovative. They also tend to operate businesses which emphasise high value‐adding activities further downstream, closer to the final market. Twenty‐two measured items associated with the eight Peters and Waterman principles differ systematically between the “excellent” and “non‐excellent” firms. In addition, 13 measures associated more directly with strategy also differ systematically. High investment in R&D, a strong international posture, and strong market positions provide an alternative explanation to the Peters and Waterman principles for good profit and innovation performance by the “excellent” firms, thus reinforcing the need to better understand industry and global strategy dynamics – as well as the ingredients of entrepreneurial, open climates.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Constantine S. Katsikeas, Matthew J. Robson and James M. Hulbert

There is concern that academic research in marketing does not sufficiently support firms confronting today's hostile business conditions. This paper offers a perspective…

Abstract

There is concern that academic research in marketing does not sufficiently support firms confronting today's hostile business conditions. This paper offers a perspective on enhancing the relevance and rigour of research in marketing. It takes the view that rigorous research conducted on issues relevant to practising managers is especially valuable for the marketing discipline's future development and status. Emphasis is placed on identifying a number of “hot” topics worthy of future investigation, accomplished by a brainstorming workshop involving a large number of distinguished marketing professors. Areas identified were global marketing strategy, consumer behaviour and marketing strategy. It is hoped that the identification and discussion of these topics will spark greater research on fundamental marketing issues, and that the allied explication of research rigour will likewise enhance the efficacy of research in marketing.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Morris B. Holbrook and James M. Hulbert

Considers the past, present and future of marketing. Whimsically but not without seriousness, concludes that marketing faces something of a Y2K problem. Indeed, as the…

Abstract

Considers the past, present and future of marketing. Whimsically but not without seriousness, concludes that marketing faces something of a Y2K problem. Indeed, as the next millennium begins, concludes that, though the marketing concept may survive, the marketing function itself is dead. Nonetheless, cautions against the concomitant extermination of marketing scholars.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 36 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Kenneth Simmonds

Summary This paper presents the case for a geocentric approach to global strategy formation. It describes the geographic adjustments that are the embodiment of both attack…

Abstract

Summary This paper presents the case for a geocentric approach to global strategy formation. It describes the geographic adjustments that are the embodiment of both attack and defence under global competition, and the geographic units that multinationals adopt as their primary organizational units to identify and carry out these adjustments. In addition to actions with local effects, global competitive performance demands actions from these primary units which will have payoffs accruing to other units. The geocentric approach to global strategy endeavours to identify and stimulate these cross‐unit opportunities through collaboration among units and the centre. The consequent needs at unit level for information on the global competitive situation are examined, as well as some common impediments to geocentric collaboration imposed by the design of planning, accounting and reporting systems.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Wayne J. Smeltz and Belmont F. Haydel

This research sought to test the existence of fragmentation between home office and overseas management and its potential impact on the planning and control of social…

Abstract

This research sought to test the existence of fragmentation between home office and overseas management and its potential impact on the planning and control of social responsiveness programs. Results indicate that fragmentation does exist between home office and overseas management especially in the perceived impact of environmental factors on strategic planning. The findings reveal that home office management appears to have a strategic orientation to management while overseas management takes a more operational approach.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Pradeep A. Rau and John F. Preble

This paper presents an analysis of the current debate on “global marketing” and the degree to which multinational firms can standardise their marketing practices across…

Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of the current debate on “global marketing” and the degree to which multinational firms can standardise their marketing practices across countries. World markets are getting increasingly homogenised but the authors contend that the framework and associated propositions generated in the paper could help multinational firms determine the degree of standardisation that is possible in different markets.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Clayton W. Barrows and J.S. Perry Hobson

“Service” became the buzzword of the 1980s. Whilenumerous business school programmes have been progressive in research,publication and education in this area, service…

Abstract

“Service” became the buzzword of the 1980s. While numerous business school programmes have been progressive in research, publication and education in this area, service management in hospitality education has yet to receive the attention that it deserves. Offers a review of service management issues, discusses the reasons why an understanding of service management concepts is important to the hospitality student, and makes recommendations for how the service concepts can be grouped together to form the basis of a service management course in a hospitality curriculum.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Daniel C. Smith, Jonlee Andrews and Timothy R. Blevins

Considers the importance of implementing a market orientation,highlighting the difficulty in focusing on competitors rather thancustomers. Offers an approach to…

Abstract

Considers the importance of implementing a market orientation, highlighting the difficulty in focusing on competitors rather than customers. Offers an approach to competitive analysis taking into account the validity of both competitor and customer orientations. Argues that this type of method can help managers to maintain or build their position in relation to competition. Illustrates the stages involved in customer‐based competitive analysis with a case example.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Morris B. Holbrook

This paper describes the personal history and intellectual development of Morris B. Holbrook (MBH), a participant in the field of marketing academics in general and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes the personal history and intellectual development of Morris B. Holbrook (MBH), a participant in the field of marketing academics in general and consumer research in particular.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper pursues an approach characterized by historical autoethnographic subjective personal introspection or HASPI.

Findings

The paper reports the personal history of MBH and – via HASPI – interprets various aspects of key participants and major themes that emerged over the course of his career.

Research limitations/implications

The main implication is that every scholar in the field of marketing pursues a different light, follows a unique path, plays by idiosyncratic rules, and deserves individual attention, consideration, and respect … like a cat that carries its own leash.

Originality/value

In the case of MBH, like (say) a jazz musician, whatever value he might have depends on his originality.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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