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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

John G. Irwin, James J. Hoffman and Scott W. Geiger

The goal of this study is to provide guidance to managers who must make decisions regarding the adoption of technological innovations. The study was conducted within the…

Abstract

The goal of this study is to provide guidance to managers who must make decisions regarding the adoption of technological innovations. The study was conducted within the context of the hospital industry. Results indicate that while adoption of technological innovations may lead to increased performance for certain hospitals, for large hospitals, and those located in rich environments, medical technology may be a ‘no‐win’ situation. Failure to adopt technology may result in the loss of patients, but adoption may result in increased costs that cannot be recovered due to underutilization.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Dan Marlin, James J. Hoffman and Bruce T. Lamont

This study reports an examination of the relationships between Porter's (1980) generic strategies, dynamic environments, and performance. In me study, profile deviation is…

Abstract

This study reports an examination of the relationships between Porter's (1980) generic strategies, dynamic environments, and performance. In me study, profile deviation is used to test strategy—environment fit. A sample of 173 acute care hospitals was used to test the proposed relationship. Results from the study indicate that adherence to an externally specified ideal strategy profile has a positive effect on firm performance. From a methodological standpoint, results suggest that empirical and theoretical profiles have equal predictive validity, and both have a higher predictive validity, than a random profile. Results also suggest that profiles can not be assumed to be robust to differences in performance measures used.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Richard A. Lheureux, James J. Hoff‐man, Bruce T. Lamont and Paul Simmonds

This study examines the moderating effect of international involvement on the relationship between two dimensions of managerial tenure and firm performance. Data for 89…

Abstract

This study examines the moderating effect of international involvement on the relationship between two dimensions of managerial tenure and firm performance. Data for 89 Fortune 500 firms of varying levels of international involvement were gathered and analyzed. The results of the empirical examination provided significant support for the moderating effect of internationalization on the relationship between top management team tenure and firm performance. In general, in firms with relatively higher levels of foreign involvement, teams with higher organizational tenure and lower job tenure realized superior performance outcomes.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/01443579410056065. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/01443579410056065. When citing the article, please cite: James J. Hoffman, Marc J. Schniederjans, (1994), “A Two-stage Model for Structuring Global Facility Site Selection Decisions”, International Journal of Operations & Production Management, Vol. 14 Iss 4 pp. 79 - 96.

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Facilities, vol. 14 no. 12/13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Scott W. Geiger, Howard Rasheed, James J. Hoffman and Robert J. Williams

Very little is known about the influences of corporate strategy and regulation on the risk of regulated firms. The current study addresses this gap by examining the…

Abstract

Very little is known about the influences of corporate strategy and regulation on the risk of regulated firms. The current study addresses this gap by examining the relationship among the level of diversification, the regulatory environment, and risk levels of regulated electric utility companies. Results suggest that both the regulatory environment and level of diversification impact firm risk. Specifically, the regulatory environment in which a firm operates moderates the relationship between diversification and risk. Electric utilities operating in the least favorable regulatory environments benefited the most from diversification in terms of risk reduction, while electric utilities in the most favorable regulatory environments experienced increases in risk from diversification. These findings extend previous studies by showing how both the regulatory environment and corporate strategy impact the risk of regulated utilities.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Charles J. Fornaciari, Bruce T. Lamont, Ben Mason and James J. Hoffman

Two views of organizational change dominate the management literature. The incremental view holds that organizations experience large‐scale strategic changes quite slowly…

Abstract

Two views of organizational change dominate the management literature. The incremental view holds that organizations experience large‐scale strategic changes quite slowly while the revolutionary view proposes that organizations experience long periods of relatively little strategic variation punctuated by short, intense periods of major change. Commonalties among the two change theories provide the basis for a study of 101 businesses over a six year period. The research examines two theoretical implications: change is bimodally and discretely distributed and skewed toward incremental strategic change, and firms undergoing revolutionary strategic change will be more likely to experience simultaneous changes on multiple organizational dimensions than firms undergoing incremental strategic change. Consistent with Proposition 1, it was found that change is skewed toward incremental, but also that change is unimodal and continuously distributed, contrary to Proposition 1. Contrary to Proposition 2, revolutionary change on multiple dimensions was found to be rare.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Bruce T. Lamont, James J. Hoffman and Monique Forte

This paper expands the theory of competitive decision making in declining industries. Kelley and Thibaut's theory of interdependence is used to analyze and explain the use…

Abstract

This paper expands the theory of competitive decision making in declining industries. Kelley and Thibaut's theory of interdependence is used to analyze and explain the use of competitive and cooperative strategies among competitors. The analysis suggests that although the use of competitive strategies is more likely, cooperative strategies should produce higher performance. Several barriers to, and facilitators of, the use of cooperative strategies in declining industries are identified, and their prescriptive implications are discussed.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Christopher J. Robertson, Michael K. Brady and James J. Hoffman

There has been a genuine lack of emphasis in the management and public policy literature on cultural issues in Latin America. This is particularly evident in the ethics…

Abstract

There has been a genuine lack of emphasis in the management and public policy literature on cultural issues in Latin America. This is particularly evident in the ethics and marketing literature. In this paper, the results from two studies are presented which address moral and marketing differences between the United States and Ecuador. In the first study, a comprehensive survey (which includes vignettes for ecological conservation, bribery, sex discrimination, and child labor dilemmas) is administered to 98 multinational managers from the U.S. and Ecuador. Results indicate that certain

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International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

James J. Hoffman, Mark L. Hoelscher and Karma Sherif

This article attempts to begin the process of removing the cloak of causal ambiguity by examining the role that knowledge management has in the creation of the wide

Abstract

Purpose

This article attempts to begin the process of removing the cloak of causal ambiguity by examining the role that knowledge management has in the creation of the wide variety of competitive advantages found in some organizations. Specifically, this article aims to extend understanding in the field of knowledge management by examining how knowledge management can affect organizational performance, and by examining one possible determinant of an organization's capacity to manage knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews literature on resources‐advantage theory of the firm, social capital and knowledge management to propose ways within the organization to improve their ability to manage knowledge and achieve sustained superior performance. The paper is structured around the following constructs: resource‐advantage theory of the firm, social capital, and knowledge management.

Findings

Describes the relationship between social capital and knowledge management and how both help organizations achieve a sustained superior performance within the market. Suggests that organizations with high levels of social capital have more knowledge‐management capabilities than organizations with low levels of social capital.

Research limitations/implications

This article extends prior research of knowledge management by proposing how social capital can positively impact the ability of organizations to manage knowledge.

Practical implications

Since resources within all businesses are relatively limited, and particularly so when the business is small relative to its competitors, the revelation that social capital can lead to more effective knowledge management makes the decision to support and nurture social‐capital development much more credible.

Originality/value

Because there is no existing literature that has examined the relationship between social capital, knowledge management, and organizational performance, this paper provides a foundation for future studies that examine the relationship between social capital and knowledge management.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Marc J. Schniederjans and James J. Hoffman

One strategy that has been used extensively to cut operation costs is downsizing, a planned reduction in a firm’s work force. Downsizing must be based on a thorough…

Abstract

One strategy that has been used extensively to cut operation costs is downsizing, a planned reduction in a firm’s work force. Downsizing must be based on a thorough analysis of the firm’s prioritized opportunities and their limited economic resources to achieve them. Some operations research techniques have appeared in the literature as practical aids in downsizing methodology. The purpose and significance of the research in this paper is to: provide the first demonstration of how a prioritized multi‐objective programming‐oriented methodology (i.e. goal programming) can be used for planning the downsizing of production/operations resources; and demonstrate a new methodological approach that can be used to determine previously hidden goals in a manufacturing linear programming model of the downsizing problem. Based on a problem reported in the literature, this paper will illustrate how an optimal allocation of production resources can be achieved while providing useful information in which to ensure other prioritized goals and their economic tradeoffs are considered in the downsizing analysis.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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