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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

James P. Hess

The purpose of this paper is to examine the macro-, meso- and micro-level approaches to building sustainability in Ghana's timber, cocoa and goldmining industries s Ghana works to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the macro-, meso- and micro-level approaches to building sustainability in Ghana's timber, cocoa and goldmining industries s Ghana works to align sustainability efforts with the sustainable development goals proposed by the United Nations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using qualitative content analysis, a synthesis of contemporary literature on Ghana's timber, cocoa and gold mining industries was conducted to provide a descriptive evaluation of sustainability efforts in those industries.

Findings

At the macro-level, Ghana continues to invest in infrastructure, privatize industries and develop an urban development agenda to encourage foreign direct investment (FDI); improved forest management and green building policies and reduction of galamsey are also implemented. At the meso-level, the timber industry encourages land reclamation and green building technologies; the cocoa industry works to replenish lost trees, develop supply-chain partnerships, and encourage certifications; the goldmining industry works to regulate informal mining and reduce galamsey and the use of toxins in exploration. At the micro-level, alignment has developed between the micro- and meso-levels in the timber and cocoa industries, whereas micro-level players in the timber industry are less successful, given its large, unregulated informal sector.

Originality/value

Existing literature is missing discussion on the alignment of macro-, meso- and micro-level approaches to sustainability in Ghana's timber, cocoa and gold mining industries with attention to the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals as the premise for the work.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2018

James P. Hess

The purpose of this paper is to examine incongruities between autonomous team members’ expectations for top-leader involvement with teams and their perceptions of top-leader…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine incongruities between autonomous team members’ expectations for top-leader involvement with teams and their perceptions of top-leader involvement actually encountered in their own team experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Interview feedback was sought from three participants from each of six autonomous teams to capture explanations of their lived experiences from team participation. Transcribed data were examined through thematic analysis, from which patterned responses and meanings relevant to the research inquiry were identified.

Findings

To foster a team environment and shape the organizational context to align with autonomous team members’ expectations, organizational leaders should give significant attention to all-inclusive recruitment; frequent, face-to-face communication between themselves and team members; and an unwavering resource allocation.

Originality/value

This study addresses a unique realm of team research in addressing the need for top leaders to understand team members’ expectations for their involvement in shaping an organizational context most conducive to team effectiveness.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 December 2019

James P. Hess

The purpose of this study is to examine the latest Millennials, born between 1995 and 2000, to determine any significant impact of gender, employment status and living arrangement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the latest Millennials, born between 1995 and 2000, to determine any significant impact of gender, employment status and living arrangement on Meriac et al.’s (2013) dimensions of work ethic.

Design/methodology/approach

A factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to identify the main and interaction effects between variables. A one-way ANOVA then revealed any statistical significance between factor combinations to determine the meaningfulness of the interactions.

Findings

Morality/ethics, the centrality of work and hard work were not significantly impacted by any factors, whereas interaction effects between gender and employment status with self-reliance and wasted time were not attributed to any particular factor level. Yet, meaningful interaction resulted in gender and employment status with leisure and delay of gratification. Specifically, women who work 20 h or less per week have less regard for leisure than men, regardless of men’ employment status. Men who work 20 h or less per week have a higher acceptance of delay of gratification than women with the same employment status.

Practical implications

Understanding the youngest Millennials’ unique paradigms about work ethic will benefit managers as they blend them with those of other working cohorts to enhance job-to-employee fit by building and sustaining recruitment, motivation and retention efforts among all workforce members.

Originality/value

This study expands existing literature by focussing on the youngest Millennials so that scholar-practitioners can closely align contemporary leadership and organisation with any unique attitudes towards work ethic and, perhaps, guide leadership transition as the next cohort emerges.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Fraya Wagner‐Marsh and James Conley

Alvin Toffler foretold the technological “third wave”, in 1980. We suggest that there is an organizational fourth wave, the spiritually‐based firm. The movement toward…

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Abstract

Alvin Toffler foretold the technological “third wave”, in 1980. We suggest that there is an organizational fourth wave, the spiritually‐based firm. The movement toward spiritualizing the organization has apparently caught on and a number of highly diverse firms are attempting to instill a spiritual corporate culture. The intent of this paper is to explore basic attitudes and practices that appear to be essential for success in maintaining a spiritual corporate culture. Six key concepts have been selected based on our review of the literature, professional observations, and in‐depth personal interviews with leaders of spiritually‐based firms: honesty with self, articulation of the corporation’s spiritually‐based philosophy, mutual trust and honesty with others, commitment to quality and service, commitment to employees, and selection of personnel to match the corporation’s spiritually‐based philosophy. As these key concepts are discussed, specific examples of how these concepts are practiced within various firms are included.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2022

Dasom Lee and David J. Hess

The purpose of this study is to explore, develop, and evaluate a new sustainable development goals (SDG) index that quantifies corporate social responsibility (CSR). By providing…

3579

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore, develop, and evaluate a new sustainable development goals (SDG) index that quantifies corporate social responsibility (CSR). By providing a granular perspective with clear justification for methods, this index is more applicable to academic research in comparison with the CSR indices published by private companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Focusing on the Fortune 500 companies in 2017, this study uses data from Bloomberg, ASSET4, and the Carbon Disclosure Project. A z-score was calculated for each variable, which was then aggregated according to the SDG indicator list to calculate each SDG score. Various robust analyses were conducted.

Findings

The SDG index shows that companies tend to score worse on environment-related goals compared with social goals. Furthermore, for each SDG, there are differences across industrial sectors, a finding that is enabled by the more granular approach of this index. Additionally, the leaders and laggards are identified for each of the SDGs.

Originality/value

This study identifies the methodological weaknesses of the existing CSR indices and introduces and evaluates an alternative index based on the SDGs. This alterative index provides methodological clarity and granularity of data, which were lacking in previously established indices.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

James Hess and Kayse Shrum

Medical education in the USA has historically been designed around social and economic conditions within the medical community, contributing to a fluctuating emphasis on the

Abstract

Purpose

Medical education in the USA has historically been designed around social and economic conditions within the medical community, contributing to a fluctuating emphasis on the number of medical schools, as well as the methods by which medicine has been taught, and ultimately leading to a shortage in the physician supply. This paper aims to describe the current status of medical education training, including the tracing of its origins, and to articulate the ability of new media to accelerate and restructure the physician preparation process.

Design/methodology/approach

The application of new media requires a rethinking of long‐held assumptions regarding the medical education process. Medical school faculty must be willing to develop new curriculum models, integrating new media technologies to facilitate varied learning modalities. Likewise, clinicians and basic scientists in medical schools must determine the most appropriate information needed by a practicing physician and make that information available via new media platforms.

Findings

The utilization of new media presents the opportunity to both accelerate and restructure the medical education and training process. The development of teaching and learning modalities via new media can positively impact the physician supply problem by transforming medical education to a competency and evidence‐based curriculum in an accelerated format.

Originality/value

The impending health consequences of a physician shortage have crystallized the need to begin immediately to expand the physician supply. In order to meet the health needs of a growing and aging population, it is imperative that the methods of medical education be altered to accelerate and improve the physician preparation process. This restructuring of the medical education curriculum is dependent on the utilization of new media to leverage the digital literacy of today's medical students.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Arnold Bacigalupo, James Hess and John Fernandes

The purpose of this paper is to describe the methods used and the qualitative success of organizational development (OD) supported efforts to alter the culture and enhance agency…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the methods used and the qualitative success of organizational development (OD) supported efforts to alter the culture and enhance agency outcomes of an academic health center.

Design/methodology/approach

Myers‐Briggs, FIRO‐B, and DISC assessments plus consultations conducted by OD professionals determined emphasis should be targeted on people, structure, and processes to create a more strategic and action‐oriented environment. The OD process accomplished: the alignment of managerial and personal styles with job responsibilities; the development of a change ready culture; the initiation of a coaching/mentoring system for individual development; the identification and ownership of core values; the reestablishment of more transparent communications; and the redistribution of power within the institution.

Findings

The OD process created an environment where performance was valued and rewarded. The institution has experienced record growth in the number of physicians attracted to the institution and in the number of patients served. Operational and fiscal performance measures also achieved record results. Beyond the metrics achieved, the institution developed a high‐performance organization with relationships based upon trust and mutual respect.

Originality/value

OD provides the ability to challenge people in a collegial and a highly competitive environment. Thus, the capacity to continually improve and change is now built into the organization so it can adapt to changes in the external environment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

James D Hess and Bruce A. Benjamin

The purpose of this paper is to review the historical development of Lean Six Sigma and to identify the relevant opportunities for the application of Lean Six Sigma within the…

2256

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the historical development of Lean Six Sigma and to identify the relevant opportunities for the application of Lean Six Sigma within the university setting. The paper also discusses the challenges of Lean Six Sigma implementation in higher education, as well as the cultural changes necessary to provide an appropriate climate for its long-term success.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper contains a comprehensive discussion of the development of Lean Six Sigma over the past three decades. Additionally, the paper describes how Lean Six Sigma may be applied in the university setting to improve processes in curriculum delivery; business and auxiliary services; admissions and enrollment management; and research.

Findings

Lean Six Sigma can be applied to facilitate process improvements in curriculum delivery; business and auxiliary services; admissions and enrollment management; and research. While obstacles to Lean Six Sigma implementation exist, the process improvements and resulting cultural changes are worthwhile and noteworthy.

Research limitations/implications

The paper serves as a guide for how Lean Six Sigma processes can be utilized in the higher education setting. Other researchers and practitioners may use the paper as a practical orientation to Lean Six Sigma in the university setting.

Originality/value

Due to the unique culture of higher education, the application of Lean Six Sigma to university processes has been sparse. The paper provides a needed orientation as to how Lean Six Sigma may be applied to improve some of the more important functional aspects of the university.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

James D. Hess and Arnold C. Bacigalupo

Little research has been contributed to how the behaviors associated with emotional intelligence may be practically applied to enhance both individual and group decision‐making…

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Abstract

Purpose

Little research has been contributed to how the behaviors associated with emotional intelligence may be practically applied to enhance both individual and group decision‐making. The purpose of this paper is to identify practical approaches to the application of emotional intelligence to the decision‐making process. These practical approaches are designed to instruct and aid decision makers in the utilization of emotional intelligence skills to improve decision‐making.

Design/methodology/approach

Goleman's and Boyatzis et al.'s four essential elements of emotional intelligence and their associated 20 behavioral competencies are utilized to develop a methodology for the practical application of emotional intelligence skills to decision‐making. A series of questions and observations are outlined to assist decision makers in the improvement of emotional intelligence awareness, as well as the utilization of emotional intelligence skills to enhance decision‐making processes.

Findings

Organizations and individuals may benefit from the development and utilization of behaviors attributed to emotional intelligence. The practical application of emotional intelligence skills can enhance individual and group decisions and outcomes.

Originality/value

The practical application of emotional intelligence skills becomes a strategy for the development of the individual's and organization's ability to assess the impact and consequences of decisions, while simultaneously improving the quality and effectiveness of the decision‐making process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

James D. Hess and Arnold C. Bacigalupo

The leader of the knowledge‐based organization is faced with the continuing dilemma of delivering the highest quality and most technologically innovative products or services at

6397

Abstract

Purpose

The leader of the knowledge‐based organization is faced with the continuing dilemma of delivering the highest quality and most technologically innovative products or services at the lowest possible cost in a rapidly changing environment. This paper aims to start with the identification of the complexities of managing the knowledge‐based organization, using emotional intelligence to balance the interests of the individual and organization, and it may also be redefined as an organizational development process rather than an outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to be effective the knowledge‐based leader must possess the characteristics most often associated with the description of emotional intelligence and must also be effective at injecting these same characteristics throughout the organization. Utilizing the premises of Stewart's intellectual economy and adapting the work of Buckingham and Coffman to the knowledge‐based organization, a series of questions is outlined to assist leaders, managers and workers in the improvement of emotional intelligence awareness and the utilization of emotional intelligence as an organizational development process.

Findings

Knowledge‐based organizations may benefit from the utilization of behaviors most often attributed to emotional intelligence, and emotional intelligence may be redefined as a process rather than an outcome for organizational development.

Originality/value

The knowledge working environment must utilize innovative processes to maintain the engagement and effectiveness of the workforce. Applying emotional intelligence as an organizational development process rather than an outcome, it becomes a strategy for the development of the individual and the organization concurrently rather than treating them as opposing interests.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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