Search results

1 – 6 of 6
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Trang P. Tran, Michelle van Solt and James E. Zemanek Jr

This paper aims to tests a conceptual model capturing the influence of personalized advertising on customer perceptions of brands in social media and identifies three…

Downloads
1499

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to tests a conceptual model capturing the influence of personalized advertising on customer perceptions of brands in social media and identifies three market segments based on customers’ reactions to personalized ads.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies are developed to test the model using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). Additionally, cluster analysis, multi-group analysis (MGA) and serial mediation tests are also conducted to provide better insights into the results.

Findings

The results of the two studies show that all nine hypotheses are supported except for H4 in Study 1. Three market segments (ad lovers, ad adjusters and ad haters) are identified. Each segment has a typical attitude toward personalized advertisements.

Research limitations/implications

Built on self-congruence literature, the current research posits that consumer-brand self-congruence can be established when a customer sees a brand advertised on Facebook after searching for that brand online. Consistently, this paper finds that through self-congruence, personalized advertising has a positive impact on brand-related outcomes.

Practical implications

Three segments identified – “ad lovers,” “ad adjusters” and “ad haters” are important for marketers. Companies should develop an appropriate advertising campaign for each segment, especially once the general data protection regulation is in place. Companies will be subject to a noncompliance penalty if an advertisement is posted on a user s account without approval. Identifying this segment promptly will not only enable companies to save resources but also help avoid legal complications associated with privacy concerns.

Originality/value

This research sheds light on the effects of personalized advertising on customer perceptions of brands in social commerce.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

James E. Zemanek and William M. Pride

Distinguishes empirically between the power that the manufacturer‐employee salesperson possesses in relation to the manufacturer itself in a channel containing an…

Downloads
839

Abstract

Distinguishes empirically between the power that the manufacturer‐employee salesperson possesses in relation to the manufacturer itself in a channel containing an industrial distributor. Finds support for the belief that, compared with the manufacturer, the manufacturer’s salesperson has as much, if not more, influence on the distributor. Also examines the possible effects of a manufacturer salesperson’s specific power bases on the distributor’s perception of salesperson power and on distributor satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2006

James A. Eckert

Working from the expanded model of adaptive selling behavior offered by Eckert and Plank (2004), this paper attempts to add greater depth and specificity to the adaptive…

Abstract

Working from the expanded model of adaptive selling behavior offered by Eckert and Plank (2004), this paper attempts to add greater depth and specificity to the adaptive output categories making them more useful for research advancement and for both the teaching and execution of an adaptive selling approach. Relevant literature is identified, organized, and offered as theory sources to support and expand the adaptive selling model.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2011

W. Paatii Ofosu‐Amaah

The birth of the African Capacity Building Foundation on February 9, 1991, was the culmination of intense efforts and groundbreaking commitment to capacity building in…

Abstract

The birth of the African Capacity Building Foundation on February 9, 1991, was the culmination of intense efforts and groundbreaking commitment to capacity building in Africa by Africa Governors of the World Bank, the Bank itself and the cofounding Institutions ‐ the African Development Bank and the United Nations Development Program, as well as numerous other individuals. The successes chalked by ACBF towards attainment of its objectives have vindicated those who held the view that establishing an indigenous African institution, with focus on and commitment to the course of Africa’s development was the right course of action at the time. Twenty years on, ACBF has supported nearly 250 projects and programs in 44 African countries and committed more than US$400 million to build capacity on the continent. Projects and programs supported by the Foundation have drawn synergy with and complemented countless other activities of various development institutions operating on the Continent. ACBF’s support has been crucial in the building of development capacity in Africa, whether in ministries of finance and economic planning or central banks. For many among us who dedicated to this initiative and worked towards its realization, we remain humbled by the opportunity to witness the twentieth anniversary of ACBF.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Paolo Guenzi, Luigi M. De Luca and Rosann Spiro

This paper aims to examine the impact of customer perceptions about a salesperson’s combined use of adaptive selling (AS) and selling orientation (SO) on customer trust in…

Downloads
1805

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of customer perceptions about a salesperson’s combined use of adaptive selling (AS) and selling orientation (SO) on customer trust in the salesperson. Based on insights from attribution theory, the contingency model of salespeople’ effectiveness, relationship marketing and market orientation literatures, the authors analyze the interplay between customer perceptions of salespeople’s AS and SO, and how this affects customer trust. Furthermore, adopting a contingency perspective, the authors investigate how two important situational variables (i.e. length of buyer–seller relationships and importance of purchase for the buyer) affect this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on regression analysis with two- and three-way interactions, using survey data from 134 business-to-business (B2B) buyers.

Findings

The results indicate that the interplay between AS and SO is negatively related to trust, and that the above situation is attenuated in sales contexts characterized by high purchase importance or enduring buyer–seller relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical findings are based on firms from a single industry. Second, a cross-sectional research design is adopted. Third, the absence of measures of objective performance (e.g. sales) might be regarded as a limitation.

Practical implications

The study suggests that salespeople willing to win customer trust should modify their approach across the relationship life cycle. Similarly, when purchase importance for the customer is low, salespeople interested in building relationships based on trust should combine AS and customer orientation. In contrast, when purchase importance is high, salespeople can only generate more trust by increasing customer orientation/reducing SO. These findings might inspire sales trainers and sales managers in developing training experiences based on adaptation and customer orientation.

Originality/value

The research contributes in several ways to the literature. First, the simultaneous effect of AS and SO on performance (i.e. customer trust) was investigated. Second, the analysis of the interaction between AS and SO was complemented by testing two important boundary conditions residing in the selling situation: purchase importance and relationship length. Third, this study is the first to examine the interplay among AS, SO and selling context outside using customer data from actual B2B sales interactions. Also, it enhances knowledge of the effects of AS on sales outcomes by adding a long-term, relational outcome (i.e. trust) to previous work that tended to focus on short-term outcomes (i.e. sales revenues). Furthermore, by investigating perceived benefits from the point of view of customers rather than sellers, our findings add to previous studies of AS which relied too heavily, or exclusively, on the voice of the seller. Finally, this study shed further light on the role played by SO in affecting customer-based performance.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Emmanuel Carsamer and Anthony Abbam

The purpose of this study is to assess the suitability of religion and religiosity in small and medium-scale enterprises’ (SMEs) tax compliance in Ghanaian markets. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the suitability of religion and religiosity in small and medium-scale enterprises’ (SMEs) tax compliance in Ghanaian markets. The current research attempts to obtain insights into the advantages of Ghanaian religious notoriety in tax compliance based on the perceptions of entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey is the main tool used in this research. A total of 472 questionnaires were distributed to SMEs without Ghana revenue authority. Because of self-administered instrument, all the questionnaires were returned for analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that Ghanaian religious notoriety does not explain SMEs’ tax compliance and that tax evasion is seen as ethical. Institutional, firm and entrepreneurs’ characteristics are important determinants of SMEs’ tax compliance.

Practical implications

The results of this research paper will help regulators and Ghana Revenue Authority in developing tax compliance education without compromising on religion.

Originality/value

This paper provides empirical evidence of the suitability of religion and religiosity in emerging markets in general and Ghana in particular and enhances the level of understanding of SMEs’ tax compliance.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6