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Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000004461. When citing the…

1755

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000004461. When citing the article, please cite: James F. Devlin, (1997), “Adding value to retail financial services”, Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, Vol. 3 Iss 4 pp. 251 - 267.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Book part
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Melissa Jane Hardie and Kieryn McKay

In 2012, the Department of English at the University of Sydney, Australia, established The LINK Project, a faculty-driven outreach program that builds sustainable…

Abstract

In 2012, the Department of English at the University of Sydney, Australia, established The LINK Project, a faculty-driven outreach program that builds sustainable partnerships with low socioeconomic status (SES) secondary schools across the state of New South Wales. Focused on discipline-centered engagement, LINK positions pedagogic work as a vital site for the advancement of a social inclusion agenda. However, the operative logic of such programs present a distinct set of pedagogical challenges if they are to negotiate the established scholarly frameworks that resist principles of inclusion and threaten to displace and exclude the cultural knowledges, skills, and capitals of students of low SES backgrounds.

This chapter postulates a framework for productive disciplinary engagement that generates new spaces for “relational equity” (Boaler, 2008) between post-secondary institutions and outreach high schools and within diverse tertiary classrooms. It draws on three LINK learning modules designed to foster new ways of forming attachments and enhancing achievement in outreach contexts. In doing so, it describes an approach that seeks to open higher education institutions to multiple knowledges and ways of knowing (Gale & Mills, 2013) in the pursuit of what Jacques Rancière (1987, p. 2) calls “the minimal link of a thing in common.”

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

James F. Devlin and Sally McKechnie

“Brand architecture” is an organisation's approach to the design and management of its brand portfolio. Previous research, focused on the views of practitioners…

4484

Abstract

Purpose

“Brand architecture” is an organisation's approach to the design and management of its brand portfolio. Previous research, focused on the views of practitioners, identified a “multi‐corporate” approach in financial services, where a “family of main brands” was incorporated into an organisation's brand portfolio, often in the form of brands traditionally associated with separate companies. The current study seeks to provide contrasting insights from consumer data and to highlight the conceptual and practical implications of the findings.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was adopted for the study incorporating six focus groups containing an average of nine participants.

Findings

The findings from the current study offer empirical support for the conceptualisation of the corporate brand playing a predominant role in services markets. In doing so, the findings also suggest that the alternative conceptualization of a “multi‐corporate” approach advocated by practitioners and identified previously is not validated by consumer‐based research.

Research limitations/implications

The context of the study reported may be limited by its restriction to a single category, financial services.

Practical implications

Practitioners' rationales for maintaining multiple brands are, in the main, undermined by the views of consumers. Organisations should consider rationalising their brand architecture in order to benefit from significant cost savings.

Originality/value

The consumer perspective on brand architecture is significantly under‐researched and as a result this paper provides valuable insights, and a significant contribution to existing literature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

James F. Devlin

The primary objective of this paper is to formulate a research agenda in the area of consumer evaluation and competitive advantage in retail financial services markets. In…

3567

Abstract

The primary objective of this paper is to formulate a research agenda in the area of consumer evaluation and competitive advantage in retail financial services markets. In order to achieve this objective, a brief exposition of the market‐led view of competitive advantage is provided, which emphasises the importance of the provision of “customer value” in the relevant market. The process of consumer evaluation of financial services offerings is then reviewed and potential problems in consumer understanding of some types of financial services offerings are highlighted. The implications of such problems for the formulation of value adding strategies are explored with reference to the conceptualisation of the financial service offering and in particular which elements of the offering may be particularly important in adding value in the eyes of consumers. Finally, propositions for research are developed and explored, with the aim of informing both academics and practitioners.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Harjit Singh Sekhon, Sanjit Kumar Roy and James Devlin

The purpose of this paper is to examine fairness within financial services. In making the contribution the authors examine fairness by four different channels to market…

1458

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine fairness within financial services. In making the contribution the authors examine fairness by four different channels to market and across a range of financial services products. The product categories in the study are those with the highest density levels in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Underpinned by the development of new measures, this paper is based on telephone interviews and on-line surveys with UK customers of financial services. More than 1,000 customers participated in the survey during the middle of 2013. After reporting the measurement model, the authors use ANOVA to report the differences in the perception of the dimensions of fairness by channel to market.

Findings

The authors found there to be significant differences in perceptions using different channels to market. The research shows that where a face-to-face interaction takes place, such as branch contact, they are perceived to be fairer than when interactions are more remote. Given the dimensions of fairness, this reveals the importance of communications during explanations so that interactions are deemed to be fair.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of this research was the examination of fairness within the setting of the UK’s financial services sector. The authors are minded that if the research is replicated in other countries or contexts then different aspects of fairness might emerge.

Practical implications

Given the challenges faced by the financial services sector, there are implications for practitioners because they must be seen to be treating customers fairly. The research shows that remote contact such as the internet is not perceived as being as fair as face-to-face contact. The fair treatment of customers is likely to lead to positive brand benefits.

Originality/value

This study complements the understanding of fairness and provides insight for scholars and practitioners, within financial services.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

James F. Devlin

This study explores practitioner views regarding which elements of the service offering to emphasise when formulating strategies to add value and, hence, gain competitive…

2933

Abstract

This study explores practitioner views regarding which elements of the service offering to emphasise when formulating strategies to add value and, hence, gain competitive advantage in services markets. In particular, the case of retail financial services is emloyed to investigate hypotheses regarding variations in importance of elements of the service offer in adding value due to increased complexity and intangibility of some offerings and the resultant implications for consumer evaluation. Evidence suggests that these issues may be particularly relevant in the context of services and that consequently many of the common prescriptions regarding strategy formulation may be rather more difficult for services organisations to implement. It is found that factors such as image and reputation of the organisation, as well as functional service quality, are perceived to be particularly important in adding value to more complex financial services offerings. More surprisingly, the features and quality of the core service provided are also perceived to be more important in adding value to complex services. In addition, factors such as price, location and recovery are perceived to be significantly more important in adding value to more simple, rather than complex, offerings. Finally, conclusions are presented.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Christine Ennew and James Devlin

Evaluates the working of the Financial Services Act, comparing itsearly promise with a rising tide of criticism, suggesting that selfregulation does not adequately…

Abstract

Evaluates the working of the Financial Services Act, comparing its early promise with a rising tide of criticism, suggesting that self regulation does not adequately safeguard the consumer interest.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

James F. Devlin and Christine T. Ennew

The strategic importance of distribution for financial services wasreflected in and reinforced by the provisions of the Financial ServicesAct. Through requirements…

Abstract

The strategic importance of distribution for financial services was reflected in and reinforced by the provisions of the Financial Services Act. Through requirements relating to polarization, best advice and commission disclosure, the Financial Services Act sought to create a regulatory framework which would provide the level of investor protection which was appropriate in a market characterized by a high level of information asymmetry and a heavy dependence on commission‐based selling. In practice the desired level of investor protection has failed to materialize, and this can be attributed not so much to a failure of the principles within the Financial Services Act as to a failure in the way in which those principles have been implemented.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

James F. Devlin

Explores practitioner views as to how to formulate strategies for adding value and, hence, gain competitive advantage, given the characteristics of many services and the…

1274

Abstract

Explores practitioner views as to how to formulate strategies for adding value and, hence, gain competitive advantage, given the characteristics of many services and the resultant implications for consumer evaluation of offerings. In particular, the case of retail financial services exhibiting increased complexity, intangibility and impalpability in the eyes of most consumers. Finds that the features and quality of the core service provided are judged by managers to be more important in adding value to more complex services, as are organisational factors such as image and reputation. Price is perceived to be significantly more important in adding value to more simple, rather that complex, offering. Presents conclusions and explores managerial implications.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

Keywords

1 – 10 of 219