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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Stephen Akunyumu, Frank D.K. Fugar, Emmanuel Adinyira and James Cofie Danku

There is an urgent need for the construction industry to improve its current performance to increase productivity and satisfy the complex and varying needs of project…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an urgent need for the construction industry to improve its current performance to increase productivity and satisfy the complex and varying needs of project clients. To be successful, construction companies must innovate. Unfortunately, the extant literature has revealed some inertia towards innovation which in several cases is because of lack of the organisational readiness required to embrace innovation. Various models for assessing organisational readiness are proposed in the literature. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to determine the applicability of existing models for assessing the readiness of construction organisations to innovate.

Design/methodology/approach

A desk study of the extant literature was conducted to identify perspectives of readiness assessment and, based on a comparative framework, a set of readiness assessment models identified was examined to ascertain their perspectives on organisational readiness assessment.

Findings

Five models/tools of organisational readiness assessments were identified and compared based on a set of identified criteria. The comparative analysis revealed that three of the models can be used to assess the readiness of construction organisations to innovate, albeit with varied scopes of modification.

Practical implications

The paper presents an overview of readiness assessment perspectives developed through models that could help organisations in selecting the most appropriate tool to assess their readiness.

Originality/value

The paper uses a comparative framework as a basis for analysing the identified models. It further discusses the strengths and weaknesses inherent in each model noting critical areas of omission.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

Michael Addy, Emmanuel Adinyira, James Cofie Danku and Florence Dadzoe

Developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa are faced with significant challenges as the economies continue to emerge. There is a huge infrastructural demand and various…

Abstract

Purpose

Developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa are faced with significant challenges as the economies continue to emerge. There is a huge infrastructural demand and various efforts to step up supply. Whilst stepping up the supply, the environmental concerns of these supplies require a lot of attention. With the need to reduce the environmental impact of buildings whilst promoting a green infrastructure, various studies have explored the obstacles to green building technology adoption. This study explores the impediments to the development of the green building market in sub-Saharan Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Using building consultants as the unit of analysis, this study explores the impediments using a structured survey questionnaire. The study area is Ghana, an emerging country in sub-Saharan Africa.

Findings

Key impediments to the development of the market is lack of awareness, lack of education and lack of fiscal incentives. The analysis shows that all the variables identified are significant in impeding the growth of the market. The results suggest that within the domain of developing countries, environmental issues may not be of immediate concern as economic issues take centre stage. For sustainability of the environment, it is unequivocal that dissemination of knowledge to key stakeholders be done.

Practical implications

Academic institutions and professional bodies have a pivotal role to play in raising awareness of green buildings. Governmental support such as various structures should be put in place to build up the local capacity of firms not only to compete with foreign counterparts but also to ensure innovative delivery of green buildings.

Originality/value

The paper presents contextual realities on the green market restrictions within developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa through a deeper understanding of market barriers and recommends pathways for stakeholders.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Kofi Agyekum, Ernest Kissi, James Cofie Danku, Godslove Ampratwum and Gideon Selorm Amegatsey

This paper aims to examine the factors that drive the career progression of construction project managers (CPM) in the Ghanaian construction industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the factors that drive the career progression of construction project managers (CPM) in the Ghanaian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the quantitative approach, the views of 80 CPMs working with D1 building construction firms were elicited using a structured questionnaire. Data was analysed using one-sample t-test, which was used to examine the relative significance of the variables. The mean scores, standard deviations and significance values (p-values) of each variable were used to examine the outcome of the survey.

Findings

The findings suggest that “existence of organizational support systems”, “ability to create identity”, “having an influential mentor and coach”, “accepting complicated and high visibility assignments” and “ability to gain managerial or leadership experience” are the key factors that drive the career progression of CPMs in Ghana.

Research limitations/implications

Findings from this study is limited to CPMs, specifically within the Ghanaian construction industry. This implies that with the fragmented nature of the construction industry, adopting these findings in construction settings within other countries may not yield the desired results, especially, if those countries do not share similar characteristics and context with Ghana.

Practical implications

Practically, this study highlights for the benefits of project managers (PM) (especially those in the construction industry) the key factors that drive their career progressions. Identification of these drivers offers the professionals with those factors to be prioritized when seeking to progress their careers in the construction industry.

Originality/value

Empirical research on the factors that drive the career progression of CPMs has not been fully examined in previous studies, though such studies in other sectors aside construction are prevalent. Hence, the identification of the drivers for career progression of construction PMs advances literature in the area and offers the professionals with those factors to be prioritized when seeking to progress their careers.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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