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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

James Carlopio and Dianne Gardner

Examines two hypotheses: first, that employees’ perceptions of their firm’s quality efforts are related to employee affective reactions (satisfaction, commitment, turnover…

Abstract

Examines two hypotheses: first, that employees’ perceptions of their firm’s quality efforts are related to employee affective reactions (satisfaction, commitment, turnover intentions), with those perceiving greater organizational quality efforts exhibiting more positive affective reactions; and, second, that perceptions of autonomy would account for the relationship between perceptions of organizational quality efforts and employees’ affective reactions. Questionnaires were completed by 228 employees of a large bank. Reports that regression analysis revealed that all of the affective reaction variables were significantly related to perceptions of quality efforts. Further analysis revealed that, while perceptions of autonomy were important with regard to affective reactions, employee perceptions of organizational quality efforts were also directly and significantly related to employees’ affective reactions. The impact of perceptions of quality efforts was found to be most significant for organizational commitment. Discusses the implications of these results.

Details

International Journal of Quality Science, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8538

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

James Carlopio

Argues that organizational rules have developed over time to servethe needs of both workers and managers. Unfortunately, it is being foundthat rules are double‐edged; they…

Abstract

Argues that organizational rules have developed over time to serve the needs of both workers and managers. Unfortunately, it is being found that rules are double‐edged; they restrict both the rule maker and the potential rule breaker. It is clear that many existing workplace rules do not serve the needs of anyone involved. Discusses several reasons why rules are difficult to change and suggests ways in which to facilitate changes in workplace rules. Concludes that, in order for rules governing existing workplace practices to change, all the relevant stakeholders must expect to gain from their revision.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2018

Dan-Ling Zheng

The purpose of this paper is to address the theoretical gap between design thinking (DT) and management. DT is a strategic concept in the current business world whereas…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the theoretical gap between design thinking (DT) and management. DT is a strategic concept in the current business world whereas the discussion of it is still insufficient. Ambidexterity could be a promising concept to explain the benefits of DT in the realm of management and strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts a thorough literature review and theoretical analysis, and offers propositions that engage the outcome of DT and the ambidextrous learning and innovation.

Findings

The author suggests the connection between DT and ambidexterity. By thoroughly discussing the effect of the traits of DT on ambidexterity, the author proposes that DT can facilitate ambidextrous learning, and ambidextrous learning could mediate the relationships between DT and ambidextrous innovation.

Research limitations/implications

This paper offers a preliminary ground for the operationalization of it. Besides, ambidexterity could provide a lens to discuss DT with other strategic concept. Furthermore, the discussion extends understanding of the pursuit of individual ambidexterity.

Practical implications

This paper provides a clearer reason for managers to adopt DT. Furthermore, it might facilitate the management education in management schools to incorporate DT as a section topic, and subsequently propagate education of DT in management schools.

Originality/value

The paper offers a theoretical platform for the study of DT in the field of management and strategy, which was rare before. The integration of DT and ambidexterity offers a decision support to the managers. Furthermore, it serves as a new approach to obtain ambidexterity in organization, which addresses the call of the research on the micro-foundations of management.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2010

Harald Bergsteiner and Gayle C. Avery

Responsibility and accountability are central to much of what managers do, but in the literature these complex social science concepts are confused. The paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Responsibility and accountability are central to much of what managers do, but in the literature these complex social science concepts are confused. The paper aims to bring theoretical rigour, structure, consistency and parsimony to this field, using as an example the subcategories of responsibility referred to as corporate social responsibility (CSR) and global responsibility.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper analyses and identifies overlaps, redundancies, gaps, limitations and flaws in current constructs of responsibility and accountability. Using this as a base, we propose a responsibility and accountability matrix comprised of eight constructs, which in turn underpin a process model in which responsibility precedes accountability.

Findings

The eight constructs are shown to be sufficient and necessary to explain: the nature of the obligation that one party has to another (role, legal, ethical and moral responsibility); the responsibilities and accountabilities that arise from decisions, actions and behaviours (causal, judged and felt responsibility; external and felt accountability); and how these responsibilities differ from constructs that define the ambit of responsibility (personal, team, corporate, social and global responsibility). This then forms the basis of a proposed generic process model of responsibility and accountability that shows how the discrete and sequential stages of the process typically unfold, and how the responsibility and accountability constructs proposed above relate to each other and to the various process stages. It argues that concepts of CSR and global responsibility, poorly defined both in practice and in the literature, can be better understood when these eight constructs are applied to them.

Practical implications

To underscore the practical implications of the theory, it shows, by reference to the model, how CSR and global responsibility can play out in the case of banks. However, being a generic model, it extends to many other applications in management and the social sciences.

Originality/value

The proposed model is highly original, clarifying, augmenting, categorising and integrating concepts of accountability and responsibility. The paper is also original in providing a framework for reducing CSR and global responsibility to their constituent first‐order constructs.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Kerry Fairbrother and James Warn

Applied research indicates strong connections between dimensions of the work place, stress and job satisfaction. Yet, there is an absence of theory to provide conceptual…

Abstract

Applied research indicates strong connections between dimensions of the work place, stress and job satisfaction. Yet, there is an absence of theory to provide conceptual understanding of these relationships. In 1999, Sparks and Cooper advocated using job‐specific models of stress as a way of developing a better understanding of the relationships. The current study adopted this recommendation and investigated a specific job context, specifically, naval officer trainees undergoing their sea training. The results indicate that a general model of stress is unhelpful in identifying the predictors of stress and job satisfaction in specific job contexts. Instead, the authors recommend identifying salient workplace dimensions rather than a broad‐brush approach when seeking workplace associations with stress.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Pritam Singh, Asha Bhandarker, Sumita Rai and Ajay K. Jain

There exists limited research directly highlighting the relationship between value preference and its association with people's expectations from the workplace. Studying…

Abstract

Purpose

There exists limited research directly highlighting the relationship between value preference and its association with people's expectations from the workplace. Studying personal value preference is important because a substantial body of research indicates that a specific pattern of value orientations predicts world views, and, hence, it may predict behavior in the workplace. Based on the above‐mentioned assumptions, the present study aims to explore the impact of value preferences on the meaning of workplace, across MBA‐ and non‐MBA graduates and Indian and non‐Indian graduates. It is proposed that value preferences will have a significant impact on meaning of workplace and values preferences are likely to differ across national culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on qualitative research, a pilot study and survey research design. Data were gathered from a sample of 312 graduates, consisting of 231 management students and 81 non‐management students. Of these 245 are Indians and 67 non‐Indians studying in India, the USA, and the UK.

Findings

Results of exploratory factor analysis helped the authors to derive ten significant factors from the meaning of workplace scale and four factors from the values scale. Results of stepwise multiple regression analysis have shown significant positive impact of value preference on the choice of preferred workplace. More specifically, higher progressive orientation has been found to positively influence the intrapreneurship factor of meaning of workplace factor. Values of personal growth, self‐fulfillment, and community development have explained a large amount of variances in work‐life balance and physical ambience.

Research limitations/implications

The literature on workplace design and the meaning of workplace is limited and a comprehensive list of variables of psychological climate is not available. Thus, extensive future research needs to be carried out in this direction. Knowing the employer's perspective about the evaluations of the workplace attributes may provide a different perspective of the meaning of workplace. Finally, this study could be expanded by using qualitative interviews along with quantitative techniques to get more in‐depth data and probe further in the factors that the graduates take into consideration while rating the extent of desirability of different environmental attributes.

Originality/value

This paper is important in that knowledge about the values of potential employees can be used to make sure that the organization recruits employees whose perceptions match the psychological environment existing in the company. Furthermore, organizations can use such information to design work environments in such a way that they meet the expectations of newer generations of workers. The study reveals cross‐cultural differences between perceptions and values. These are particularly important in the case of multinational corporations, which consider the impact of cultural and societal values while designing work environments and processes in different countries, as well as while recruiting employees with different cultural backgrounds.

Details

Facilities, vol. 29 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Nikki Bell, Jennifer Lunt, Jennifer Webster and Tim Ward

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dimensions that distinguish high from low performing manufacturing companies in Great Britain with respect to controlling…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dimensions that distinguish high from low performing manufacturing companies in Great Britain with respect to controlling noise. The findings should assist regulators and industry to develop interventions that help organisations to effectively manage noise, particularly amongst the low performers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses quantitative and qualitative methods. Survey data was obtained from 215 manufacturers and supplemented with 15 qualitative interviews to assess performance and individual, social, environmental and organisational influences on duty holders' decision making for controlling noise.

Findings

Relative to low performers, decision makers from high performing companies had: greater in-depth knowledge of noise risks and controls; taken steps to promote positive health and safety attitudes and values; were large companies; and faced fewer resource barriers (time, costs, staffing). Managers in small, low performing companies sought simple interventions with a practical focus.

Research limitations/implications

The differences reported between high and low performing companies showed a small magnitude of effect but these are considered significant in a health and safety context.

Practical implications

Improvements in training and education, and addressing workplace health and safety culture, are recommended as offering most potential to raise the standard of noise control.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to systematically assess the specific knowledge, attitudes, values and beliefs that employers hold about noise and the influence of social, environmental and organisational factors on manager’s decisions about noise controls.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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