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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Syed Awais Ahmad Tipu and James C. Ryan

This study aims to explore the degree to which the editorial policies of business and management journals explicitly or implicitly discourage replication studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the degree to which the editorial policies of business and management journals explicitly or implicitly discourage replication studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines differences in editorial policy toward replication studies relative to journal quality, age and sub-discipline area. A total of 600 journals (listed as Q1 and Q2 in Scopus) were selected for the current study.

Findings

The results reveal that out of 600 selected journals, only 28 (4.7%) were explicitly open to considering replication studies, while 331 (55.2%) were neutral, being neither explicitly nor implicitly dismissive of replication studies. A further 238 (39.7%) were implicitly dismissive of replication studies, and the remaining 3 (0.5%) journals were explicitly disinterested in considering replication studies for publication. CiteScore and source normalized impact factor of neutral journals were significantly lower than those of journals, which were implicitly discouraging replication research. With regard to the journals implicitly discouraging replications (238), journals in the subcategory of business and international management (51) had the highest percentage (21.4%) followed by strategy and management 30 (12.6%) and OB and HR 25 (10.5%).

Originality/value

The available literature does not explore the degree to which the editorial policies of business and management journals explicitly or implicitly discourage replication studies. The current study attempts to address this gap in the literature. Given the lack of support for replications among business and management journals, the current paper sets forth the suggested steps which are deemed crucial for moving beyond the replication crisis in the business and management field.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Mumin Dayan, Robert Zacca, Zafar Husain, Anthony Di Benedetto and James C. Ryan

This study aims to assess the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and development culture and the role of willingness-to-change in this relationship and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and development culture and the role of willingness-to-change in this relationship and analyzes their effect on new product exploration in small enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

A model based on structural equations with partial least squares (PLS) analysis is used to test the hypotheses. This model was tested on a sample of 250 respondents from 125 small enterprises, with less than 50 employees, located in all seven emirates of the UAE.

Findings

The results suggest that EO will induce organizational members’ willingness-to-change and will favor the advancement of a development culture in small enterprises; in addition, EO, willingness-to-change and development culture can lead to new product exploration in small enterprises.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings are subject to potential limitations. First, the research design for the quantitative study was cross-sectional and self-reported, which could cause problems of common method and inflation bias. Second, the conceptual model may not be completely representative of the perspective the authors aim to elucidate. Third, as this study is country-specific, further research investigation in other developing economies is recommended to further understand the possible influences of cultural or socioeconomic contexts on the relationships presented in the model.

Practical implications

The article includes several practical implications about the relationships between willingness-to-change and development culture. It sheds light on the controversial link between EO and new product exploration in small enterprises.

Originality/value

The present study expands current knowledge on the EO–new product exploration relationship by investigating some key mediating variables such as willingness-to-change and development culture in an under-researched context such as UAE.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

James C. Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the use of bibliometric indicators as a people analytics tool for examining research performance outcome differences in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the use of bibliometric indicators as a people analytics tool for examining research performance outcome differences in faculty mobility and turnover.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing bibliometric information from research databases, the publication, citations, h-index and newly developed individual annualized h-index (hIa-index) for a sample of university faculty is examined (N = 684). Information relating to turnover decisions from a human resource (HR) information system and bibliometric data from a research database are combined to explore research performance differences across cohorts of retained, resigned or terminated faculty over a five-year period in a single university.

Findings

Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results indicate traditional bibliometric indicators of h-index, publication count and citation count which are limited in their ability to identify performance differences between employment status cohorts. Results do show some promise for the newly developed hIa-index, as it is found to be significantly lower for terminated faculty (p < 0.001), as compared to both retained and resigned faculty. Multinomial logistic regression analysis also confirms the hIa metric as a predictor of terminated employment status.

Research limitations/implications

First, the results imply that the hIa-index, which controls for career length and elements of coauthorship is a superior bibliometric indicator for comparison of research performance.

Practical implications

Results suggest that the hIa metric may serve as a useful tool for the examination of employment decisions for universities. It also highlights the potential usefulness of bibliometric indicators for people analytics and the examination of employment decisions, performance management and faculty turnover in research-intensive higher education contexts.

Originality/value

This empirical paper is entirely unique. No research has previously examined the issue of turnover in a university setting using the bibliometric measures employed here. This is a first example of the potential use of hIa bibliometric index as an HR analytics tool for the examination of HR decisions such as employee turnover in the university context.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

James C. Ryan and Syed Awais Tipu

The purpose of this paper is to present findings related to an instrument for the self‐appraisal of scientists' research performance, and highlight the suitability of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings related to an instrument for the self‐appraisal of scientists' research performance, and highlight the suitability of self‐appraisal instruments for members of the scientific community.

Design/methodology/approach

An examination of the literature on self‐appraisal and the measurement of scientific research is presented. The initial development of the instrument employed qualitative methods through interview and discussions with PhD‐qualified scientific researchers (n=13). A quantitative investigation of the usefulness of the instrument was then conducted on a sample of biological and chemical research scientists (n=270). Results were compared with an existing performance measure and examined for representative reliability.

Findings

Results suggest that the instrument may be a reliable measure of research performance when used in a non‐critical context.

Research limitations/implications

While the instrument shows promise, further research is needed to examine aspects of inter‐rater reliability. Additional research is also needed to further examine relationships between it and other measures of research performance at the same level of analysis. While the usefulness and validity of this instrument at the “international level” has been examined, further research is needed to examine the relative validity and reliability of the instrument at the “institutional” and “national” levels.

Practical implications

The instrument provides a useful and cost‐effective tool for use in the performance appraisal process of research scientists, and for use in focusing discussion on performance for developmental purposes. It is also useful as a research tool for the timely and cost‐effective measurement of research performance at an institutional, national and international level.

Originality/value

The paper presents an original paper and pencil instrument for the appraisal of scientific research performance at an institutional, national, and international level.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 58 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Kay Gallagher and James Pounder

Abstract

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

James C. Ryan, Syed A. Tipu and Rachid M. Zeffane

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the need for achievement (N‐ach) and entrepreneurial potential of young adults in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the need for achievement (N‐ach) and entrepreneurial potential of young adults in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of university business students (n=305) took part in the study. The data were collected using a tailored questionnaire designed to assess respondents' level of N‐ach motivation and their relative potential to pursue entrepreneurial activities.

Findings

The results revealed a strong correlation between N‐ach and entrepreneurial potential among the participants. Analysis of differences across gender and nationality was also conducted, revealing lower levels of N‐ach for UAE national participants, and higher levels of N‐ach among women participants.

Practical implications

Results support the view that achievement motivation is a potentially important factor in explaining entrepreneurial success. It also highlights a potential problem for the UAE economy and society in addressing the relatively low levels of N‐ach among UAE nationals, especially males.

Originality/value

Despite a professed desire on the part of the UAE Government to diversify the economy and promote entrepreneurial activity among UAE nationals, little research has been done on the nature of important variables such as N‐ach and entrepreneurial potential in the region. This research addresses a key gap in the literature by exploring this relationship.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Elizabeth P. Karam, William L. Gardner, Daniel P. Gullifor, Lori L. Tribble and Mingwei Li

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the…

Abstract

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the past decade. Consideration of the implications of these constructs for high-performance human resource practices (HPHRP) is limited, however. In this monograph, we present a conceptual model that integrates authentic leadership/followership theory with theory and research on HPHRP. Then, we apply this model to systematically consider the implications of skill-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing HR practices in combination with authentic leadership for authentic followership, follower work engagement, and follower performance. We contend that authentic leadership, through various influences processes, promotes HPHRP, and vice versa, to help foster enhanced work engagement. By cultivating greater work engagement, individuals are motivated to bring their best, most authentic selves to the workplace and are more likely to achieve higher levels of both well-being and performance.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Arthur Seakhoa-King, Marcjanna M Augustyn and Peter Mason

Abstract

Details

Tourism Destination Quality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-558-0

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Vaughn Schmutz, Sarah H. Pollock and Jordan S. Bendickson

Previous research suggests that women receive less critical attention and acclaim in popular music. The authors expect that gender differences in the amount and content of…

Abstract

Previous research suggests that women receive less critical attention and acclaim in popular music. The authors expect that gender differences in the amount and content of media discourse about popular musicians occur because music critics draw on the cultural frame of gender as a primary tool for critical evaluation. In order to explore the role of gender as a frame through which aesthetic content is evaluated, the authors conduct detailed content analyses of 53 critical reviews of two versions of the popular album 1989 – the original released by Taylor Swift in 2014 and a cover version released by Ryan Adams less than a year later. Despite Swift’s greater popularity and prominence, the authors find that reviews of her version of the album are more likely to focus on her gender and sexuality; less likely to describe her as emotionally authentic; and more likely to use popular aesthetic criteria in evaluating her music. By contrast, Ryan Adams was more likely to be seen by critics as emotionally authentic and to be described using high art aesthetic criteria and intellectualizing discourse. The authors address the implications of the findings for persistent gender gaps in many artistic fields.

Details

Gender and the Media: Women’s Places
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-329-4

Keywords

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