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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Gavin James Baxter

This special issue aims to increase the awareness of the organisational factors that enterprises must reflect on and address when introducing Web 2.0 technologies into…

2644

Abstract

Purpose

This special issue aims to increase the awareness of the organisational factors that enterprises must reflect on and address when introducing Web 2.0 technologies into their organisations. In contrast to empirical studies that review the impact of Web 2.0 technologies in organisations in terms of how they might support knowledge sharing or communities of practice, this special issue intends to identify the salient criteria that management practitioners must address to assist in the implementation of Web 2.0 technologies in the work place.

Design/methodology/approach

This special issue aims to increase the awareness of the organisational factors that enterprises must reflect on and address when introducing Web 2.0 technologies into their organisations. In contrast to empirical studies that review the impact of Web 2.0 technologies in organisations in terms of how they might support knowledge sharing or communities of practice, this special issue intends to identify the salient criteria that management practitioners must address to assist in the implementation of Web 2.0 technologies in the work place.

Findings

One of the principal findings that have emerged from this special issue is that it indicates the importance of reviewing social and cultural factors in organisations when introducing Web 2.0 technologies in the work place. In addition to assessing technical issues that might impact on the implementation of Web 2.0 technologies in organisations this special issue also explores subject matters such as the dilemma of whether a top-down or a bottom-up approach is more effective towards engaging staff in the adoption of Web 2.0 tools at work.

Originality/value

The research presented in this special issue provides an important academic contribution towards an area that is, at present, under researched namely, whether there is a structured approach that can be universally applied by organisations when internally implementing Web 2.0 technologies into their work place.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

James S. Baxter

This paper aims to review property and valuation education within the university context, using the experience of program re‐development at RMIT University, Melbourne…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review property and valuation education within the university context, using the experience of program re‐development at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises a literature review, comparing and contrasting the program renewal process within the university to experiences elsewhere and their inherent values. In critically examining some of the difficulties found within the program renewal process, issues symptomatic of the wider valuation profession and tertiary education system have been revealed. It provides the genesis of a wider study linking tertiary education and the valuation profession's needs in the mid‐term.

Findings

Valuation education is often subsumed within a generalist property curriculum. As part of their resource allocation models universities are now paying close attention to teaching quality, research output, and graduate outcomes, often favouring generalist curricula rather than discipline‐specific. There needs to be a careful analysis of the university experience of property and valuation students to ensure that graduate capabilities meet industry expectations, and that graduates themselves are able to adapt to future change. There also needs to be greater attention paid to the quality of teaching within universities and more evidence that mainstream tertiary teaching pedagogy is properly applied within the programs offered.

Research limitations/implications

As a case study this paper chronicles the experiences at one university. It indicates a need for a wider, systematic study of how greater engagement by property and valuation academic and teaching staff can be more actively engaged in mainstream university teaching pedagogy.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in its chronicling of a detailed and structured renewal process. It highlights real difficulties faced by tertiary academics in a narrow discipline such as valuation during a renewal process, aimed at continuing high‐quality professional education.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Gavin James Baxter and Thomas M. Connolly

The aim of this paper is to examine the subject area of implementing Web 2.0 tools in organisations to identify from the literature common issues that must be addressed to…

2832

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the subject area of implementing Web 2.0 tools in organisations to identify from the literature common issues that must be addressed to assist organisations in their approach towards introducing Web 2.0 tools in their workplace. Based on the findings of the literature a Web 2.0 tools implementation model is presented.

Design/methodology/approach

A general scoping review of the literature will be conducted to identify potential issues that might impact on the implementation of Web 2.0 tools in organisations to provide an overview of examples of empirical evidence that exists in this subject area with a view to examining how to advance this particular field of research.

Findings

The findings of the scoping literature review indicate that while certain conceptual models and frameworks exist on how to implement Web 2.0 tools in organisations there is a lack of evidence to suggest that they have been empirically tested. The paper also notes that though organisations are unique, based on the literature common features can be found regarding “best practice” on how to introduce Web 2.0 tools in organisations.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not present any findings based on an empirical study involving the implementation of Web 2.0 tools in organisations. The paper does however provide scope for both academic and management practitioners to adopt and test the models and frameworks identified in the literature review when implementing Web 2.0 tools in their organisations.

Originality/value

The contribution to knowledge that this paper provides is that it reviews an area where there is a lack of empirical evidence, namely, in the approaches that organisations can adopt when implementing Web 2.0 tools. Based on the findings from the literature and through the creation of a Web 2.0 tools implementation model, this paper provides practical guidance to management practitioners who might find introducing Web 2.0 tools into the workplace a challenge.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

James Baxter

706

Abstract

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

James George, Ian Sturgess, Sarbjit Purewal and Helen Baxter

This article reports an important multi‐centre practice‐based review that identifies good practice and an ideal pathway for the healthcare of frail older people, which, if…

Abstract

This article reports an important multi‐centre practice‐based review that identifies good practice and an ideal pathway for the healthcare of frail older people, which, if replicated nationally, could result in improved quality of care and better value for money for the NHS. Data on healthcare resource groups (HRGs) in England were examined as a marker for the management of elderly people through the healthcare system. Care pathways in several different NHS trusts were explored via staff interviews. A high variation in treatment outcomes across centres was found. Principles of best practice were identified and include: comprehensive geriatric assessment; the availability of specialist geriatric teams and wards; and shared assessment and co‐ordination between care agencies.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

David Greenwood and James Baxter

243

Abstract

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Kerry D. Vandell

This paper aims to trace the evolution of the theory and practice of valuation of real estate interests. Using a historical perspective, especially in the context of…

2850

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to trace the evolution of the theory and practice of valuation of real estate interests. Using a historical perspective, especially in the context of recent events, it identifies an emerging unification of thought and application that has important implications for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies and synthesizes the contributory literature to the philosophical underpinnings of value theory and practice as applied to real estate. From pre‐history to the present, it traces classical concepts and the way these are related to the recent innovations in economic and financial valuation theory.

Findings

Recent contributions to value theory hold the promise of unifying and transforming the practice of real estate appraisal to one that is state‐of‐the‐art in terms of its contemporary relevance. However, numerous issues remain as obstacles, including insufficient recognition of the “real” nature (as opposed to “capital” nature) of real estate; a lag in educational standards to bring the profession up to date; an excessive reliance on models and data rather than judgment and common sense; and “silo‐ization” of specialties. Promising directions for future research are identified.

Originality/value

The task of valuation of interests in real property has taken on an increasingly important role, as the market for real estate has grown and become more liquid and complete. This paper provides a perspective on where it has come from and where it must go in the future in terms necessary changes in theory and practice to remain viable and relevant.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Nick French and Laura Gabrielli

In January 2005, the International Valuation Standards Committee (IVSC) published the International Valuation Guidance Note No. 8 entitled The Cost Approach for Financial

2460

Abstract

Purpose

In January 2005, the International Valuation Standards Committee (IVSC) published the International Valuation Guidance Note No. 8 entitled The Cost Approach for Financial Reporting – (DRC). This guidance note provides background to the use of depreciated replacement cost (DRC) in connection with International Valuation Application 1 (IVA 1), Valuation for Financial Reporting and suggests that the valuer reports the result of a DRC valuation as market value subject to the test of adequate profitability or service potential. This suggestion has caused a lot of debate and consternation in the UK where the DRC approach has always been considered as a method of last resort and not a market valuation. However, in continental Europe the cost approach (DRC) is often the principal method of valuation and has always been considered to produce market value. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact of this change to valuation practice in the UK.

Methodology/design/approach

In this paper, we discuss the concept of market value and its relationship to DRC in an attempt to identify the principal areas of concern in the UK and, through the use of an Italian case study, show how the DRC approach can be adopted as an appropriate method (not basis) for calculating Market Value.

Findings

It is probable that most valuers will still provide the DRC valuation using exactly the same calculation as they did before. They are likely to provide the same (relative to the valuation date) figure; the difference is that they will feel less easy about the robustness of that figure

Originality/value

It is argued that the UK market has, for too long, hidden behind DRC being a basis of value that UK valuers now feel uncomfortable in reporting DRC as market value. They are uncertain with the valuation figure. However, this uncertainty can be addressed in other ways and a suggested “solution” to help the valuer overcome their discomfort with the market valuation is proffered.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

John M. Barry

In 1986 The Roper Center celebrated its fortieth year as the largest archive of survey data in the world. It was, in fact, 1946 when Elmo Roper founded the center at…

Abstract

In 1986 The Roper Center celebrated its fortieth year as the largest archive of survey data in the world. It was, in fact, 1946 when Elmo Roper founded the center at Williams College. A collection of 177 surveys conducted by Roper Research Associates served to establish the center as the first archive of polling data. From the start, the center laid the framework by which other pioneers in the field of opinion research, especially George Gallup, Sr., came to appreciate its scholarly nature. Subsequently many of these pioneers helped increase its holdings by donating survey material of their own.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

David Tretton

The paper's purpose is to review the growth of computer supported valuation models and the increased access via information technology to property data in the world of…

2831

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's purpose is to review the growth of computer supported valuation models and the increased access via information technology to property data in the world of property taxation. The paper aims to stimulate debate on what the short/medium term future may hold. Is there room for both traditional valuation surveying skills and computer mass appraisal models in the enlightened property taxation world, where transparency and access to property data is expected?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper compares and contrasts developments and trends in the use of automated valuation models (AVMs) across the world to assess property for local taxation purposes. It focuses in detail on three automated property taxation valuation systems of which the author has working knowledge and experience: Valuation Office Agency – Council Tax (Dwellings) and Non Domestic Rating (Commercial); Northern Ireland Valuation and Lands Agency – Domestic (Dwellings); Hong Kong Rating and Valuation Department (Dwellings and Commercial) property. The paper also considers the progress made in access to property data and data storage/retrieval.

Findings

Automated valuation programmes assist in the production of a valuation but its quality and accuracy are data and valuer led. One size does not fit all and there is no automated replacement for the subjective professional judgement of the valuer.

Originality/value

This paper considers the challenges, opportunities and possible problems when using computer driven valuation models for property taxation purposes.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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