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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

James R. Barth, Daniel E. Nolle and Tara N. Rice

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the structure, regulation, and performance of banks in the EU and G‐10 countries. This enables one to identify any…

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1024

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the structure, regulation, and performance of banks in the EU and G‐10 countries. This enables one to identify any significant differences in the structure of banking in the nineteen separate countries comprising these two groups. The regulatory, supervisory, and deposit‐insurance environment in which banks operate in each of these countries is also compared and contrasted. This enables one to identify any significant differences in the regulatory environment that may help explain the structure of banking in the various countries. Beyond this, the effect of the overall structural and regulatory environment on individual bank performance is investigated in order to evaluate the appropriateness of existing regulations in individual countries and any proposals for reforming them. Hence, an exploratory empirical analysis based upon a sample of banks in the different countries is conducted to assess the effect of the different “regulatory regimes” on the performance of individual banks, controlling for various bank‐specific and country‐specific factors that may also affect bank performance. In this way, the paper attempts to contribute to an assessment of the appropriate balance between market and regulatory discipline to ensure that banks have sufficient opportunities to compete prudently and profitability in a competitive and global financial marketplace. In the process of conducting such an assessment, the paper necessarily provides information as to whether the U.S. is “out‐of‐step” with banking developments in other industrial countries.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 23 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Pei Xu, Joonghee Lee, James R. Barth and Robert Glenn Richey

This paper discusses how the features of blockchain technology impact supply chain transparency through the lens of the information security triad (confidentiality…

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1167

Abstract

Purpose

This paper discusses how the features of blockchain technology impact supply chain transparency through the lens of the information security triad (confidentiality, integrity and availability). Ultimately, propositions are developed to encourage future research in supply chain applications of blockchain technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Propositions are developed based on a synthesis of the information security and supply chain transparency literature. Findings from text mining of Twitter data and a discussion of three major blockchain use cases support the development of the propositions.

Findings

The authors note that confidentiality limits supply chain transparency, which causes tension between transparency and security. Integrity and availability promote supply chain transparency. Blockchain features can preserve security and increase transparency at the same time, despite the tension between confidentiality and transparency.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted at a time when most blockchain applications were still in pilot stages. The propositions developed should therefore be revisited as blockchain applications become more widely adopted and mature.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to examine the way blockchain technology eases the tension between supply chain transparency and security. Unlike other studies that have suggested only positive impacts of blockchain technology on transparency, this study demonstrates that blockchain features can influence transparency both positively and negatively.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

James R. Barth, Yanfei Sun and Shen Zhang

The exact criteria used by state governors for choosing opportunity zones (OZs) are not publicly available. This paper aims to examine whether state governors selected the…

Abstract

Purpose

The exact criteria used by state governors for choosing opportunity zones (OZs) are not publicly available. This paper aims to examine whether state governors selected the most distressed communities, or those with the highest proportions of minorities, as OZs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper compares the distressed communities chosen as OZs in states throughout the country to an equal number of those eligible distressed communities but not selected. Moreover, this paper uses regression analysis to determine whether the poverty rate, median family income, population, percentage of population that is minority and the percentage of population that is African American are significant explanatory factors in the choice of OZs.

Findings

After describing the tax incentives for investing in OZs, this paper documents that governors did not select many of the most distressed communities, or those with high proportions of minorities, in their individual states.

Originality/value

This paper describes in some detail the way in which investors may generate tax benefits by investing in eligible property or businesses in OZs. It also examines the extent to which the degree of poverty and the percentage of the population that is minority (and African American) were key factors in the selection of OZs. It arises an issue that the chosen communities are not necessarily those most in need of more investment or those heavily populated by minorities, particularly African Americans.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Richard J. Cebula

Using Cointegration Tests, Granger‐Causality Tests, and OLS, this study empirically investigates the determinants of the rate of return on savings and loan assets over the…

Abstract

Using Cointegration Tests, Granger‐Causality Tests, and OLS, this study empirically investigates the determinants of the rate of return on savings and loan assets over the 1965–1991 period. It is found that it is determined by the mortgage rate, the capital/asset ratio, the price of imported crude oil, the cost of deposits, and the ceiling on federal deposit insurance.

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Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

James Barth and John Jahera

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264

Abstract

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Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

James Barth and John Jahera

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335

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Ali Jamali

The FDIC Improvement Act of 1991 sets out five categories of capital and mandates corrective action for banks. Each bank based on its capital amount fall in the certain…

Abstract

Purpose

The FDIC Improvement Act of 1991 sets out five categories of capital and mandates corrective action for banks. Each bank based on its capital amount fall in the certain categories or states. The purpose of this paper is to consider the effect of banking regulations and supervisory practices on capital state transition.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the authors investigate how much the practices influence banks' capital adequacy using a dynamic panel data method, the generalized method of moments. Then, to scrutinize the results of the first phase, the authors estimate the effect of practices on some characteristics of capital state transition such as transition intensity, transition probability and state sojourn time using multi-state models for panel data in 107 developing countries over the period 2000 to 2012.

Findings

The dynamic regression results show that capital guidelines, supervisory power and supervisory structure can have significantly positive effects on the capital adequacy state. Moreover, the multi-state Markov panel data model estimation results show that the significantly positive-effect practices can change the capital state transition intensity considerably; for example, they can transmit the critical-under-capitalized (the lowest) capital state of banks directly to a well or the adequate-capitalized (the highest) capital state without passing through middle states (under-capitalized and significantly-undercapitalized). Moreover, the results present some new evidence on transition probability and state sojourn time.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper, unlike the existing literature, is to consider the power of banking regulations and supervisory practices to improve the capital state using a multi-state Markov panel data model.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

James Barth and John Jahera

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626

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

James Barth and John Jahera

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263

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

James Barth and John Jahera

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500

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

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