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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Abdullah Murrar, Madan Batra and James Rodger

Service quality and customer satisfaction influence the financial performance of service organizations. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the path…

Abstract

Purpose

Service quality and customer satisfaction influence the financial performance of service organizations. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the path relationship of service quality to customer satisfaction to financial sustainability in the water service sector, which is vital to the sustainable future of mankind. Further, these three interrelated constructs and their dimensions are clearly articulated.

Design/methodology/approach

SERVQUAL questionnaire responses were collected from 635 household families, and the financial sustainability indicators of 56 water providers were gathered as well. Cronbach's alpha and factor analysis were conducted to measure the internal consistency and convergent validity. Path analysis was utilized to evaluate the causal diagram by examining the relationships among service quality, customer satisfaction and financial sustainability using the AMOS software package.

Findings

The results showed that the five dimensions of service quality explain 58% of the customer satisfaction variation. The responsiveness, empathy, assurance and reliability have significant impact on the customer satisfaction where p < 0.05, while the tangible dimension has an insignificant effect. The results also revealed that customer satisfaction has a significant impact on the financial sustainability indicators of the water providers, where p = 0.000 for the debt collection ratio indicator, and p = 0.003 for the financial efficiency ratio indicator.

Research limitations/implications

This research on financial sustainability is based on evidence about service quality and customer satisfaction in the Palestinian water sector. Future research on financial sustainability of the water sector may focus on the pricing mechanism and debt collection of water service.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that water providers should recognize the importance of service quality dimensions, which strengthen the customer satisfaction, which, in turn, is a significant driver for their financial sustainability. It is, therefore, sound to draw action-oriented managerial implications from these results.

Originality/value

The study adds to the literature of water service sector and is based on empirical evidence from primary data of household families and secondary data of water service providers from developing countries. This paper also contributes toward the strengthening of sustainability of the water service sector in Palestine – a worthy humanitarian cause. The study provides evidence useful for policy makers toward carving out policies aimed at strengthening the financial sustainability of the water service sector.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

James A. Rodger, Parag C. Pendharkar, David J. Paper and Patricia Molnar

In 1997, Gamma Health Care Systems embarked on a redesign project for their Human Resource Information System (HRIS). Redesign involved major changes to the existing…

Abstract

In 1997, Gamma Health Care Systems embarked on a redesign project for their Human Resource Information System (HRIS). Redesign involved major changes to the existing system to guarantee a very high level of service. This case describes the efforts of the Human Resource Department (HRD) to redesign its HRIS to better meet enterprise‐wide goals of cost effectiveness and efficiency. The reengineering project transformed the HRD from a historic role of transaction processing to one of a strategic partner.

Details

Facilities, vol. 16 no. 12/13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Parag C. Pendharkar and James A. Rodger

client/server(C/S) systems have revolutionized the systems development approach. Among the drivers of the C/S systems is the lower price/performance ratio compared to the…

Abstract

client/server(C/S) systems have revolutionized the systems development approach. Among the drivers of the C/S systems is the lower price/performance ratio compared to the mainframe‐based transaction processing systems. Data mining is a process of identifying patterns in corporate transactional and operational databases (also called data warehouses). As most Fortune 500 companies are moving quickly towards the client server systems, it is increasingly becoming important that a data mining approaches should be adapted for C/S systems. In the current paper, we describe different data mining approaches that are used in the C/S systems.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

David Paper, Ray Chang and James A. Rodger

The purpose of the research is to explore the role of creativity (in business process improvement paradigms) among Japanese organizations and US organizations. Although…

Abstract

The purpose of the research is to explore the role of creativity (in business process improvement paradigms) among Japanese organizations and US organizations. Although US and Japanese organizations may use differently terminology, the general idea of process improvement (to add value to products and/or services that exceed customer expectations) is embraced by both. What is not clear is the way in which organizations in the two countries implement change. Eight organizations participated in the study: four organizations from Japan and four from the US. Results of the study revealed that US organizations tend to desire faster change to improve performance. They want to adopt state‐of‐the‐art methodologies and invest heavily in technology to transform their organizations quickly. In contrast, Japanese organizations prefer incremental change as it conforms to their culture and way of life. However, US organizations are beginning to realize that process improvement is greatly enhanced by changing the culture of the work place. Moreover, Japanese organizations are realizing that individual creativity is very important for future competitiveness in the world marketplace.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

David J. Paper, James A. Rodger and Parag C. Pendharkar

We embarked on a case study to explore one organization’s experiences with radical change for the purpose of uncovering how they achieved success. The organization we…

Abstract

We embarked on a case study to explore one organization’s experiences with radical change for the purpose of uncovering how they achieved success. The organization we examined was Honeywell Inc. in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. From the interview data, we were able to devise a set of ten lessons to help others transform successfully. Two important lessons stand out above the rest. First, execution of a carefully developed change plan separates the high performers from less successful BPR projects. Second, recognition that dealing with change is difficult and complicated is not enough. Top management should make change management a top priority and communicate the change vision across the organization.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

As global competition drives organizations towards becoming leaner and more streamlined, many corporations have turned to Business Process Reengineering (BPR) as a means…

Abstract

As global competition drives organizations towards becoming leaner and more streamlined, many corporations have turned to Business Process Reengineering (BPR) as a means to radically change the way they conduct business. However, in many instances, dramatic improvements have just failed to materialize …

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

D. RODGER

Benchmark problem 5 of the TEAM workshops consists of four aluminium blocks placed in the space between the jaws of an electromagnet. Three dimensional eddy currents are…

Abstract

Benchmark problem 5 of the TEAM workshops consists of four aluminium blocks placed in the space between the jaws of an electromagnet. Three dimensional eddy currents are induced by 50 Hz time‐varying flux. Eleven sets of results from nine groups of contributors are compared with experimental measurements. The results from most of the computer codes tend to converge to common limits. These limits are in some places slightly different from some of the measured results. The reason for this discrepancy is thought to be due to the idealised boundary conditions, ignoring any losses in laminated iron, which are assumed in all the computer models.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Case study
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Jordon Swain, James Tuite and John Borland

The case describes the dilemma a young leader, First Lieutenant Toomey, faces after arriving at a new organization. Toomey’s subordinate (sergeant first class Rodgers) is…

Abstract

Synopsis

The case describes the dilemma a young leader, First Lieutenant Toomey, faces after arriving at a new organization. Toomey’s subordinate (sergeant first class Rodgers) is more experienced and accomplished and has enjoyed a degree of autonomy under Toomey’s predecessor. Rodger’s demeanor and the physical setup of the joint office space speak to a dysfunctional dynamic in an organization that values a traditional hierarchy and relatively high power distance between supervisor and subordinate. The potential for conflict exists as Toomey contemplates how to address the dysfunctional norms he has observed while maintaining a functional relationship and reputation as an effective leader in his new unit.

Research methodology

The case was created via an interview of the protagonist.

Relevant courses and levels

This case is designed for use in undergraduate and graduate level courses on leadership and management. The case is useful for teaching lessons (or electives) on power, influence, conflict management, culture and leading change.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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