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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Lenna V. Shulga and James A. Busser

The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of consumers value collaboration with a service provider, specifically, how consumer self-determination affects…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of consumers value collaboration with a service provider, specifically, how consumer self-determination affects value co-creation outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-determination theory (SDT) need-based motivational factors were operationalized in co-creation as commitment to resources (autonomy), feedback (competence) and collectives (relatedness). A between–within factorial experimental design (3 × 2 × 4) was conducted using online scenarios depicting value co-creation in a destination resort setting. Respondents were randomly and equally assigned to strong and weak SDT factor conditions. Next, they were exposed to scenarios depicting four types of value co-creation: co-innovation, co-creation of marketing, co-creation of experience and co-recovery, followed by an assessment of their co-created value (CCV), well-being, satisfaction and service advantage perceptions.

Findings

Results revealed that overall strong SDT conditions produce better outcomes. Consumers’ relatedness showed the strongest difference between strong and weak SDT conditions on the CCV dimensions. Further analysis revealed that autonomy and relatedness are crucial for collaboration. CCV meaningfulness is central for customers to improve their well-being, satisfaction and competitive advantage perceptions through co-creation.

Originality/value

The study contributes to a line of research on successful voluntary value co-creation processes between consumers and a company. The integration of service-dominant logic (SDL), axiology of value (AOV) and SDT, uniquely operationalized as commitment to resources as autonomy, feedback as competence and co-creation collective as relatedness offers a better understanding of how customers appraise the dimensions of CCV and outcomes of well-being, satisfaction and competitive advantage.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2021

Lenna V. Shulga, James A. Busser and Billy Bai

This study aims to examine how hospitality consumers of different generations appraise competitive service advantage (CSA) of service providers, based on providers…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how hospitality consumers of different generations appraise competitive service advantage (CSA) of service providers, based on providers’ business models and value propositions, particularly, how these perceptions influence consumers’ purchase intention, subjective well-being and trust in service provider.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a 3 × 4 between-within online scenario-based experimental design (business models: traditional, collaborative, shared; value propositions: innovation, marketing, service production, recovery) using equal and randomized assignment to experimental conditions. Following equal quota-based randomized sampling, three generations were examined (n = 180): baby boomers, Generation Xers and millennials. Multivariate analysis of variance and PROCESS macro were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Hospitality consumers perceived value propositions from providers with different business models inversely based on their perceptions of firms’ CSA, subjective well-being and trust. CSA amplified the outcomes and served a mediating role for purchase intention, subjective well-being and trust. Different outcomes were based on generational cohorts.

Practical implications

Customer perceptions of firm’s unique competitive position should be managed holistically by combining business models, value propositions and generational cohorts to ensure customers’ purchase intention, trust and subjective well-being. CSA should be communicated to customers differently based on generational membership.

Originality/value

This study deepens knowledge of CSA, specifically from the consumer level of analysis. The key contribution is the role of CSA as a mediator for hospitality business models and customer-related outcomes of purchase intention, subjective well-being and trust. This study brings forward consumer subjective well-being as a potential goal for hospitality firms.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2019

James A. Busser and Lenna V. Shulga

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and test customer perceptions of four types of value co-creation (VCC), explore VCC a priori condition of relatedness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and test customer perceptions of four types of value co-creation (VCC), explore VCC a priori condition of relatedness, operationalized as commercial friendship, examine customer voluntary participation in VCC through initiation (customer vs company), and the influence of these factors on relational outcomes of VCC: satisfaction, loyalty and trust.

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario-based 2×2×4 experimental design was set in a destination resort context: weak vs strong commercial friendship, customer vs company co-creation initiation and four types of VCC. The 248 resort guests were equally and randomly assigned to experimental conditions. Multivariate analysis of variance and repeated measures analysis of variance was utilized.

Findings

Results demonstrated that customers perceived VCC processes differently. Co-creation of experience and co-recovery outcomes had significantly higher relational outcomes when compared to co-creation of marketing and co-innovation. Experiencing stronger commercial friendship, as customer–company relatedness and being invited to co-create resulted in stronger customer relational outcomes.

Originality/value

The core theoretical contribution of this study is the comparative analysis of customer perceptions of four distinctly different types of VCC: co-innovation, co-creation of experience, co-creation of marketing and co-recovery. A priori conditions of relatedness and co-creation initiation were established as antecedents of VCC processes among customers and service providers. When a service provider initiates VCC, it can positively affect customers’ relational outcomes of satisfaction, loyalty and trust.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Christopher Paul Cain, Lisa Nicole Cain, James A. Busser and Hee Jung (Annette) Kang

This study sought to understand how having a calling influenced engagement, work–life balance and career satisfaction for Professional Golfers Association of America (PGA…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to understand how having a calling influenced engagement, work–life balance and career satisfaction for Professional Golfers Association of America (PGA) and Golf Course Superintendent of America (GCSA) professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was used to examine callings among golf course supervisors and its impact on their engagement, work–life balance and career satisfaction. This study also explored the moderation effect of employees’ generalized or specialized role on the calling–engagement relationship. Surveys were collected from a single golf management company and partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results revealed significant relationships among all of the variables, with the exception of the impact of having a calling on work–life balance. Additionally, the more having a calling increased, the more important it was for supervisors to have specialized roles to increase their engagement.

Originality/value

This study identifies important differences in factors that promote career satisfaction for golf course supervisors and extends current understanding of role theory.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2019

James A. Busser and Lenna V. Shulga

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer involvement with a popular US-based coffee-shop brand consumer-generated advertising (CGA) and its effect on brand loyalty…

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2310

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer involvement with a popular US-based coffee-shop brand consumer-generated advertising (CGA) and its effect on brand loyalty and trust, to test the influence of antecedents: organizational transparency and brand authenticity on CGA involvement, and to analyze differences among customers and non-customers of the brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded in the service-dominant logic and signaling theory, a scenario-based survey describing a contest to co-create a video commercial, as CGA, for a prominent US-based coffee-shop brand, yielded 492 responses from recent restaurant patrons. Structural equation modeling was used to test the effects of involvement in CGA on loyalty and trust. Multi-group comparison examined the differences between customers and non-customers of the brand.

Findings

Involvement in CGA had positive effects on loyalty and trust for both brand customers and non-customers. Transparency builds perceptions of brand authenticity; both authenticity and transparency significantly and positively affected trust, but only authenticity influenced loyalty. There was a stronger impact of involvement with CGA on loyalty for non-customers than brand customers. Non-customer perceptions of the brand’s authenticity influenced brand trust more significantly than customer perceptions.

Practical implications

Coffee-shop brand marketers should leverage online and physical brand exposure to involve both customers and non-customers in company-driven CGA, as a relationship management and marketing tool. Marketers should enhance transparency, which builds perceptions of brand authenticity, leading to greater CGA involvement.

Originality/value

This study contributes to hospitality research and literature, revealing that non-customers can be converted to brand customers through authenticity and indirect involvement with CGA, leading to long-term relational outcomes. The results identified consumers’ perception of organizational transparency is an antecedent of brand authenticity and established CGA contests as a relational marketing tool for hospitality brands.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2019

Wen Chang and James A. Busser

This study aims to understand employee career retention in the hospitality industry. Building on the socially embedded model of thriving, signaling theory and social…

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1483

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand employee career retention in the hospitality industry. Building on the socially embedded model of thriving, signaling theory and social cognitive career theory (SCCT), the study examines a structural model of psychological contract fulfillment (PCF), perceived organizational support (POS), thriving, career satisfaction and career turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed research model was tested using structural equation modeling with responses from 300 US hospitality employees. Data were collected using an online survey available through a panel service at Qualtrics.

Findings

Empirical results supported all proposed hypotheses and confirmed the critical mediation role of thriving for workplace contextual factors and employee career retention. As predicted, both PCF and POS positively influenced employee thriving, which positively influenced career satisfaction and negatively influenced career turnover intention.

Practical implications

Findings of this study yielded several recommendations for hospitality managers, including using the concept of thriving as an indicator and a remedy for employee career development and retention.

Originality/value

Given the increased need for qualified talent and reduced career satisfaction, this study sheds light on the further understanding of sustainable employment in the hospitality industry. Using signaling theory and SCCT as an overarching framework, this study extends the socially embedded model of thriving as well as SCCT and supports combining psychological contract theory and organizational support theory to better understand hospitality career retention.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2019

Lenna V. Shulga and James A. Busser

The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the state of substantive, methodological and conceptual development of talent management (TM) within hospitality and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the state of substantive, methodological and conceptual development of talent management (TM) within hospitality and business research and to identify gaps, examine debates and provide hospitality research direction.

Design/methodology/approach

After identifying 545 articles from 22 peer-reviewed journals from Google Scholar using “talent management,” only articles directly related to TM (n = 149) were analyzed using the validity network schema (VNS). The advantage of the VNS approach is in-depth analysis of the three research domains – substantive, methodological, and conceptual – and evaluation of the pathways between domains emerging in a unique hospitality TM perspective.

Findings

Substantive domain TM discourse analysis identified 12 general and 5 hospitality-related topics. The resulting research framework depicted how global trends, organizational, employee-specific factors and organizational-management tactics affect (1) organizational, (2) personal, (3) societal, and (4) customer outcomes. Methodological domain analysis revealed business TM research in the mature stage, while hospitality TM research is in the embryonic stage of development. TM researchers predominantly used observational, descriptive and industry-specific data, advancing the field with associated research frameworks. Conceptual domain analysis uncovered opportunities to advance theoretical foundations and test causal relationships.

Originality/value

VNS analysis identified the importance of conceptual, methodological and substantive domains of TM research. The comprehensive TM research framework was proposed with eight research pathways to guide future hospitality studies. This paper advances the unique hospitality industry-specific scholarship and practice, focused on employee well-being rather than solely organizational gain.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Hee Jung (Annette) Kang, James Busser and Hyung-Min Choi

This study aims to develop a conceptual model of service climate in hospitality, which tests its relationship with psychological capital (PsyCap), quality of work life…

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2033

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a conceptual model of service climate in hospitality, which tests its relationship with psychological capital (PsyCap), quality of work life (QWL) and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected among hotel employees by using an intercept approach and Qualtrics online survey system. Structural equation modeling examined the hypothesized relationships among the constructs in the conceptual model.

Findings

Service climate showed a positive relationship with PsyCap and QWL, and PsyCap partially mediated this relationship. Employees’ level of PsyCap had a powerful impact on QWL. Specifically, employee QWL was a critical mediator (full mediation) between service climate and turnover intention. Finally, PsyCap and QWL showed combined mediating effects between service climate and turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the service climate literature in hospitality by offering a new conceptual model representing employees’ perceptions of service climate that influence their willingness to leave the organization with the mediating effects of PsyCap and QWL based on the theory of work adjustment.

Practical implications

The theory of work adjustment provides a deeper understanding of how employees’ perception of service climate affects their turnover intention in hospitality, based on a sample of hotel employees.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the importance of service climate in understanding the turnover intention of hotel employees.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Yunying Zhong, Valeriya Shapoval and James Busser

This study aims to apply parasocial relationship theory to understand the hospitality brand-consumer relationship on social media. Aiming to examine brand-initiated…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to apply parasocial relationship theory to understand the hospitality brand-consumer relationship on social media. Aiming to examine brand-initiated mechanisms that drive relationship development, the study identified two sets of brand actions as antecedents, namely, content-related (utilitarian and hedonic benefits) and interaction-related factors (perceived interactivity and openness). This study also investigated the subsequent impacts of parasocial relationships on customer engagement behaviors and brand loyalty. As baby boomers are an important but understudied consumer cohort in social media marketing, this study empirically tested the proposed model for this specific group.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted electronically with baby boomer consumers from the USA. The partial least squares analysis was used to test the model validity for this consumer group.

Findings

The results of this study showed that content-related factors had significant effects on the parasocial relationship, which, in turn, significantly influenced customer engagement and brand loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

This study responds to the recent calls from scholars on developing and expanding a nomological network of parasocial relationships to understand consumer-brand relationships in social media. By focusing on baby boomers, this study adds unique insights on understanding online relationships and engagement, specifically for this cohort. Future studies should expand the study by examining other generations, platform differences or using longitudinal methods.

Practical implications

This study informs hospitality marketers in the development and implementation of a successful Facebook relationship building campaign targeting baby boomers.

Originality/value

According to the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study known to have developed a coherent parasocial relationship model that combined content-related benefits, interaction-related factors, online engagement and brand loyalty. It also represents one of the few to examine how hospitality brands can build a parasocial relationship with baby boomers, an important but cohort, on social media and provide actionable insights to hospitality marketers for this generation.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Lisa Cain, James Busser and Hee Jung (Annette) Kang

This paper aims to understand the relationships among calling, employee engagement, work-life balance and life satisfaction for executive chefs based on role theory and…

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2637

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the relationships among calling, employee engagement, work-life balance and life satisfaction for executive chefs based on role theory and spillover theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were completed by members of the American Culinary Federation in North America, the Nevada Restaurant Association and attendees at the ChefConnect Annual Conference. The data were analysed with confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

Findings

All relationships in the model were significantly positive except for calling to life satisfaction. Importantly work-life balance was a significant mediator between calling and life satisfaction as well as for employee engagement and life satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides a more comprehensive framework for hospitality scholars to understand the outcomes of work as a calling through meaningfulness. The sample of executive chef limits generalizability.

Practical implications

The identification of a calling through in-depth interviews is recommended. Once recognized, managers should further foster chef’s passion through employee engagement facilitated by workplace autonomy and continuing education and work-life balance supported with human resource management practices including time off for critical life events. This will allow calling to flourish, increase life satisfaction and reduce the likelihood of turnover and burnout.

Originality/value

Outcomes reveal the complexity of the relationship between calling and life satisfaction. Contrary to previous findings, the presence of positive work-life balance was critical to attain life satisfaction, even when work was viewed as a calling.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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