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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2018

Gholamhossein Mehralian, Jamal A. Nazari and Peivand Ghasemzadeh

Knowledge is a key success factor in achieving competitive advantage in the current fast-paced and uncertain economic environment. Several studies in the literature have…

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Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge is a key success factor in achieving competitive advantage in the current fast-paced and uncertain economic environment. Several studies in the literature have analyzed the relationship between knowledge creation (KC) and organizational success; however, the mechanisms by which KC leads to accumulation of intellectual capital (IC) and thereby affects various dimensions of organizational performance are understudied. The purpose of this paper is to examine how KC and IC and their relationship influence key dimensions of organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model was developed and tested based on the literature in the areas of KC, IC and organizational performance. This study uses a survey sent to companies in an intensive knowledge-based industry. The balanced scorecard (BSC) approach was used to measure the key dimensions of organizational performance.

Findings

The results from structural equation modeling (SEM) on 470 completed questionnaires received from the pharmaceutical companies in Iran reveal that KC activities lead to the accumulation of organizational IC and IC has a crucial and positive impact on the BSC. Furthermore, the results from the path analysis indicate that IC mediates the effects of KC on the BSC.

Practical implications

The findings of this study contribute to the extant literature on the relationship between knowledge and organizational performance by demonstrating that knowledge and KC lead to performance when organizations utilize KC activities and leverage them to accumulate IC. Once used effectively, IC will result in a better performance in the knowledge-intensive environments.

Originality/value

This is the first study that investigates how KC contributes to firm performance by incorporating the mediating impact of IC on the BSC. The proposed model and results will help organizations to identify the mechanisms through which KC initiatives improve organizational performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Fereshteh Mahmoudian, Jamal A. Nazari and Irene M. Herremans

Drawing on the natural resource-based view and the literature on management control systems as a package, this study aims to investigate organizations’ sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the natural resource-based view and the literature on management control systems as a package, this study aims to investigate organizations’ sustainability control systems designed to achieve the interrelated sustainability objectives of performance and reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use three-stage least squares regressions on archival data for a large sample of international companies.

Findings

Better environmental performance and sustainability reporting quality are related to certain control system components, and the dual objectives of sustainability performance and reporting are interrelated.

Originality/value

This study provides theoretical contributions and practical implications by demonstrating how a set of sustainability control components can enable better sustainability reporting and performance outcomes.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2019

Peivand Ghasemzadeh, Jamal A. Nazari, Mandana Farzaneh and Gholamhossein Mehralian

Different studies have analyzed the relationship between organizational learning (OL) and innovation performance (IP). However, the question of how innovation culture (IC…

1310

Abstract

Purpose

Different studies have analyzed the relationship between organizational learning (OL) and innovation performance (IP). However, the question of how innovation culture (IC) affects the relationship between OL and IP remains unexplored. This study aims to examine the impact of IC on the relationship between OL and various dimensions of IP, including product, process and objective innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model was developed and performed based on the relevant literature in the field of OL, IC and IP. The hypotheses are tested with the data collected from companies operating in an intensive knowledge-based industry.

Findings

Based on the results of 625 questionnaires completed by pharmaceutical companies, OL activities and IC can result in product and process innovation. However, this relationship was not supported for the objective innovation. Furthermore, in terms of the moderating role of IC in the relationship between OL and IP dimensions, the results were significant.

Practical implications

The findings help to gain a better understanding of how organizational commitment by creating a culture for innovation can help to maximize the benefits of continuous OL in product and process innovation.

Originality/value

Considering the three aspects of IP, it is the first survey of the contribution of OL in firms’ IP with considering the moderating role of IC. The proposed model would enrich the relevant literature and provide us with better understanding how OL contributes to the IP.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Mandana Farzaneh, Peivand Ghasemzadeh, Jamal A. Nazari and Gholamhossein Mehralian

The direct impact of organizational learning (OL) on organizational performance has been studied over the past two decades. However, how OL contributes to organizational…

1113

Abstract

Purpose

The direct impact of organizational learning (OL) on organizational performance has been studied over the past two decades. However, how OL contributes to organizational innovation still remains under-researched. Based on the knowledge-based view of the firm and dynamic capability theory, we developed a theoretical framework in order to empirically examine how OL offers organizations the essential tools for creating dynamic capabilities (DCs), which pave the way for innovation performance (IP).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply a time-lagged, multisource and survey-based research designed to test the proposed model in the pharmaceutical industry where knowledge is a source of innovation. The data collected from companies operating in such an industry were analyzed by utilizing hierarchical regression analysis to explore how OL could lead to IP through DC.

Findings

The results indicated that OL is positively, significantly associated with DCs, as well as its dimensions of learning, integrating and reconfiguring capabilities. The findings showed that these capabilities are significant predictors of innovation performance. In addition, the findings revealed that innovation culture significantly moderates the relationship between DCs and innovation performance.

Originality/value

By dedicating more time and resources, managers can reinforce dynamic capabilities as a strategic tool to generate new knowledge and distribute it across the organization, which can go a long way toward boosting innovation performance in the pharmaceutical industry. This study offers researchers and practitioners invaluable insights into how effective OL can enhance firm-level innovation performance through dynamic capabilities.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Gholamhossein Mehralian, Jamal A. Nazari, Golnaz Nooriparto and Hamid Reza Rasekh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the implementation of total quality management (TQM) and organizational performance, using the balanced…

3844

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the implementation of total quality management (TQM) and organizational performance, using the balanced scorecard (BSC) approach.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to investigate the relationship between TQM and BSC, a questionnaire was developed and distributed to 30 largest pharmaceutical distribution companies in Iran. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the measurement model and to test the research hypotheses using the data from 933 completed questionnaires.

Findings

The results supported the research model and revealed that TQM implementation can positively and significantly influence the BSC and its four perspectives.

Practical implications

Considering the strong association between TQM and all four perspectives of organizational performance (BSC), managers should strongly leverage the implementation of TQM practices in order to reach their strategic objectives.

Originality/value

This study is the first empirical study conducted on the association of TQM and BSC in the pharmaceutical industry. The findings of this study provide strong evidence supporting the implementation of TQM in the pharmaceutical context.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 66 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Jamal A. Nazari, Irene M. Herremans, Robert G. Isaac, Armond Manassian and Theresa J.B. Kline

This study aims to empirically investigate the role of organizational culture and climate in supporting intellectual capital (IC) management systems. Specifically, it…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically investigate the role of organizational culture and climate in supporting intellectual capital (IC) management systems. Specifically, it seeks to investigate the relationship between organizational characteristics (culture and climate) and IC management systems in the Middle East (Iran and Lebanon) and Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered via a survey instrument and statistical analysis was used to test for significance between dependent and independent variables. Then a two‐stage hierarchical multiple regression was used to test for the nature and effects of country of origin as a moderating variable.

Findings

The findings suggest that both culture and climate play significant roles in developing management systems for IC. In addition, for country, when organizational climate improves, Middle Eastern respondents perceived an even greater improvement in IC management systems compared to their Canadian counterparts.

Originality/value

There is limited research that has been undertaken to compare developed and developing countries with regard to the influence of organizational characteristics on IC management systems. This research is timely given the recent publication of the Arab Human Development Report and the Arab Knowledge Report. This study provides insight into the ability of organizations in the Middle East to develop a knowledge base and reduce the knowledge gap between the Arab world and countries currently classified as knowledge intensive.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2018

Irene M. Gordon and Jamal A. Nazari

This paper aims to examine the impact of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) on the academic business ethics literature with the intent of making this research more…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) on the academic business ethics literature with the intent of making this research more accessible to those researchers and practitioners working in business ethics and other related fields. Specifically, the authors outline the types and scope of SOX-related research, examine the extent of reliance on SOX, identify which theoretical frameworks and research approaches are used and point out under-researched areas.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a descriptive approach, the authors examine the theoretical perspectives, classifying these perspectives into four groupings (economics, ethics/moral, psychological and sociological). Using counts, categorization and content analyses, the authors provide an overview of 115 articles with further analysis provided for articles relying heavily (n = 14) or moderately (n = 42) on SOX.

Findings

Whistleblowing and codes of ethics are well-researched topics. However, employment of some theories (e.g. signaling theory and stakeholder theory) and qualitative approaches are used less often. Other under-researched issues in the sample include CEO/CFO certifications, cost of compliance, auditor disclosures and empirical investigation of SOX and auditor independence (or corporate culture).

Research limitations/implications

The authors’ decision to use certain databases, search terms and research methods, and to focus on business ethics journals and English language articles are possible limitations.

Originality/value

The authors’ contributions comprise an examination of the scope of SOX topics and detailing how reliant the research is on SOX. The authors identify trends in this literature and provide evidence of the broad theoretical frameworks to better understand the breadth and depth of theories used.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Jamal A. Nazari and Irene M. Herremans

In the intellectual capital (IC) literature, only a few studies have analyzed the relationships among the components of IC and organizational success. This study sets out…

5682

Abstract

Purpose

In the intellectual capital (IC) literature, only a few studies have analyzed the relationships among the components of IC and organizational success. This study sets out to extend the current models to provide further insight into the role of IC in organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study provides a theoretical discussion designed to push the measurement of IC into a more rigorous and comprehensive domain.

Findings

As this is a theoretical paper, several hypotheses are presented for testing in the future.

Practical implications

Recognizing the most influential elements of IC on organizational performance would help organizations to understand better the organizational capabilities they possess. In addition, the suggested extension would enable researchers to use archival resources to do cross‐company comparisons.

Originality/value

The suggested extension to the VAIC model builds on several IC models that have not been well‐connected in the literature previously.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

Jamal A. Nazari, Irene M. Herremans, Robert G. Isaac, Armond Manassian and Theresa J. Kline

This study sets out to examine how organizational characteristics are related to intellectual capital and how these variables are different between Canadian and Middle…

1385

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to examine how organizational characteristics are related to intellectual capital and how these variables are different between Canadian and Middle East contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed to measure the four major study constructs, i.e. intellectual capital, culture, climate, and organizational traits. Each of these constructs was represented by a number of subscales that were subjected to ANOVA and correlations to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The analysis showed that all three categories of characteristics (culture, climate, and other traits) are significantly correlated with IC management. The results also indicated significant differences in all organizational characteristics and IC management between Canada and the Middle East.

Research limitations/implications

Culture, climate, and other traits are important enablers for the effective management of IC. Although the research tested three culture variables, four climate variables, and two other traits, future research should investigate these variables and the interactions among them more thoroughly.

Practical implications

The results have implications for organizations operating in different international contexts. Managers can use the results for more effective and efficient management of organizational characteristics that would foster IC management.

Originality/value

The research provides a comprehensive study of enablers of effective IC management, an area of study that has not received much attention in the past. It also provides insight as to why effective IC management may be more successful in certain countries.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Jamal A. Nazari, Irene M. Herremans and Hussein A. Warsame

The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of internal variables, such as strategic governance and operational controls, along with external variables that…

4463

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of internal variables, such as strategic governance and operational controls, along with external variables that influence sustainability reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on the corporate governance and sustainability reporting literature, the authors develop a model to integrate external motivators and internal facilitators to determine their impact on sustainability reporting. The authors also control for a number of financial and non-financial variables that may influence sustainability reporting. The authors limit their sample to the companies in extractive industries that report their greenhouse gas emission to the Government of Canada. The authors collected the data from several data sources including secondary archival databases, newspapers, Web sites and annual reports.

Findings

Using a sample of companies in high-polluting industries, the authors found that variables representing both external pressures that act as motivators and internal controls that act as facilitators are significantly associated with enhanced sustainability reporting.

Practical implications

Considering the formation of several international initiatives such as International Integrated Reporting Council to improve sustainability reporting for decision-making, the authors’ research provides interesting insights both to policymakers and managers about organizational characteristics that are important to make reporting useful and relevant.

Originality/value

Little academic research has investigated the role of internal variables in facilitating sustainability reporting. The authors use a robust model that combines external and internal variables to more thoroughly understand the reporting process.

Details

Corporate Governance, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

1 – 10 of 42