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Case study

Gaunette Sinclair-Maragh

Hospitality and tourism management; strategic management; marketing, transportation system management and human resource management.

Abstract

Subject area

Hospitality and tourism management; strategic management; marketing, transportation system management and human resource management.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate in business and management and hospitality and tourism management.

Case overview

This teaching case outlines the historical background, successes and challenges of the national airline of Jamaica. It shows how a national airline, which is a heritage asset and one that has provided nostalgic and sentimental value to the Jamaican people and its passengers, had to be divested. The airline has been faced with several challenges; the major one being high-operating costs, especially in light of the global economic recession. The case also highlights the various procedures carried out by the Government of Jamaica before and after the divestment arrangement and also by the acquirer, Caribbean Airlines.

Expected learning outcomes

The student should be able to: first, differentiate among the various strategic management terms and concepts used in the case; second, explain the importance of strategic decisions versus emotional decisions; third, assess the environmental factors that impacted Air Jamaica's operation; fourth, analyse the environmental factors that should have been considered by Caribbean Airlines before making the decision to acquire Air Jamaica; fifth, carry out a comparative analysis of the various corporate-level strategies to identify the best option for the Government of Jamaica; sixth, propose reasons why Caribbean Airlines acquired Air Jamaica.

Supplementary materials

Teaching note.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Book part

Nigel O. M. Brissett

Tertiary education in the Anglophone Caribbean, particularly in Jamaica, has become highly competitive and complex and increasingly influenced by global neoliberal…

Abstract

Tertiary education in the Anglophone Caribbean, particularly in Jamaica, has become highly competitive and complex and increasingly influenced by global neoliberal discourses. This free-market driven development is partly evidenced by the proliferation of national, regional, and international providers. Yet, within this seemingly unrelenting international influence, one can also detect more recent approaches by regional governments in concert and individually, through policy and systems of governance to reassert their sovereignty and retain some level of regulation and ownership of tertiary education. This chapter establishes an analytical framework for understanding these tertiary education governance changes by drawing on the principles of critical educational policy analysis. The chapter scrutinizes the multiple sources of power, international, regional, and national, that shape the rapid ongoing tertiary educational changes. Ultimately, the chapter argues that Jamaica’s tertiary education governance can be categorized as a shift from the governance mechanisms of “growth driven” to “regulatory control.” The chapter further posits that future regional shifts in tertiary education governance will be shaped by the continuing postcolonial struggles to adapt to the global order while protecting regional and national interests and aspirations.

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Book part

Stephen Meyers

Purpose: Researchers and advocates alike have noted that persons with disabilities and older persons are the two groups most marginalized by neoliberal economic policies…

Abstract

Purpose: Researchers and advocates alike have noted that persons with disabilities and older persons are the two groups most marginalized by neoliberal economic policies and therefore could come together as a broad-based movement against the roll back of their rights. Yet, these two groups fail to collaborate, and instead compete against one another for an ever-shrinking pool of benefits. This chapter explores the barriers to their collaboration within the context of structural adjustment in Jamaica.

Methods/Approach: The author engages in a critical analysis of neoliberalism's effect on the advocacy strategies of the disability and older persons' movements in Jamaica based on 32 semi-directed depth interviews, participant observation of numerous events, and a survey of media written by local advocates.

Findings: The disability movement makes claims on behalf of their members by focusing on the potential returns that society will gain by providing the opportunities that will make young persons with disabilities productive employees over their lifetime. The older persons' movement advocates by portraying themselves as “vibrant” and worthy of social investment because of the contributions they make. Both of these arguments for inclusion are also exclusionary. The disability movement excludes older persons as potential contributors and the older persons' movement similarly excludes persons with disabilities.

Implications: The only way neoliberalism will successfully be rolled back and universal rights returned is if the disability movement and older persons' movements build an alliance that is more inclusive, including of one another, by rejecting the language of investment and productivity, and instead focus on rights and inherent dignity.

Details

Disability Alliances and Allies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-322-7

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Book part

Dawn Smith-Henry

For much of its 43-year history, the community college sector in Jamaica has been plagued by perceptions of inferior status and mediocre tertiary education offerings. The…

Abstract

For much of its 43-year history, the community college sector in Jamaica has been plagued by perceptions of inferior status and mediocre tertiary education offerings. The Jamaican colleges have responded to the criticisms by aggressively pursuing quality assurance initiatives such as program accreditation, expanded course offerings, and ongoing curriculum review. This chapter traces the birth and development of the community college movement in Jamaica and the Caribbean and acknowledges the significant achievement of the Jamaican colleges in increasing access to tertiary education. The chapter also examines threats to the open access policy that may have serious implications for education equity and quality. These include inadequate funding, limited infrastructure to support the curriculum, low enrolment of specialized groups, and unsatisfactory completion and graduation rates. Recommendations for policy and practice are proposed.

Details

Contexts for Diversity and Gender Identities in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Equity and Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-056-7

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Book part

Nickesia S. Gordon and Juliana Maria D. Trammel

This study looks at how local grassroots organizations as well as international Women Non-Governmental Organizations (WNGOs) and multilateral organizations such as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study looks at how local grassroots organizations as well as international Women Non-Governmental Organizations (WNGOs) and multilateral organizations such as the United Nations utilize social media to empower women in Jamaica and Brazil. The researchers also evaluate how issues of socio-economic background as well as social media infrastructure influence the selection of entities with which the respective WNGOS connect.

Methodology/approach

This study uses NodeXL, a social media research tool, to analyze the information found on WNGO social media pages such as Facebook and Twitter. The authors also use content analysis to make sense of the data on WNGO Facebook pages. The study specifically uses summative content analysis, a method that translates the frequency of occurrence of certain symbols into summary judgments and comparisons.

Findings

Social media usage by WNGOs in Jamaica and Brazil show striking similarities regarding who gets reached or are connected to the networks. The study reveals that women of lower socio-economic backgrounds in both cases are not being reached via social media. Further, the outcomes of the observed current social media communication patterns on WNGO social media sites suggest the occurrence of what the authors refer to as the “noticeboard” effect, wherein communication patterns are top-down, exclusive, and non-reciprocal in nature.

Social implications

While social media offer less centralized ways of engaging in communication with local communities, inherent in social media infrastructure are issues of race, gender, and social class that affect how these communication platforms are used, potentially another dimension of the “Mathew Effect” in the context of social media usage for purposes of achieving national development objectives.

Originality/value

With the rise in internet penetration in both countries, WNGOs are increasingly incorporating social media into their communication strategies to accomplish development goals. This study is the first to compare both countries in this respect and so adds new insights to this area of the communication field.

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-481-5

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Article

Andrew J. Spencer and Larisa M. McBean

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the level of alignment of tourism investment in Jamaica with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and their economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the level of alignment of tourism investment in Jamaica with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and their economic, social, cultural and environmental impacts on the country.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is interpretive, combining both quantitative and qualitative research methods. This comprises primary data; collected from interviews of tourism policy makers and experts; and analysis of secondary research data on tourism investments made by government agencies and other organizations that generate and/or provide official statistical data. Interviews are conducted in a semi-structured, open-ended format that enable respondents to provide insights and expound on ideas shared.

Findings

The findings reveal that some SDGs have greater alignment with some of the targets of the SDGs than others. The results proffer a possible reason for this; this could be owing to the priorities of the Ministry of Tourism as it relates to investment in tourism development – investment in improved infrastructure is high on the priority of the Ministry, and therefore reflects better alignment to SDG 9, which relates to infrastructure.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a backdrop from which to assess Jamaica’s investment activities in furtherance of inclusive and sustainable tourism. The findings also inform decision makers – whether they continue on the current trajectory, or in facilitating adjustments to enable tourism investments to better align with the SDGs. The main limitation lies in the fact that the research findings may only be transferable and generalized to the extent that other jurisdictions bear similar macroeconomic characteristics to Jamaica.

Practical implications

This study lends itself to opportunities for future research in other similar small island developing states. It also contributes to the body of knowledge on investments that work to further the aims of the SDGs and provides a base from which to conduct further research.

Social implications

The social implications of tourism investment closely align with SDGs including tourism that is more inclusive and sustainable; that reduces income inequalities; that is beneficial to all Jamaicans, whether directly or indirectly; and that contributes to the development of human capital.

Originality/value

This study evaluates investment alignment with the SDGs in relation to Destination Jamaica. No previous work has been done to explore this relationship; hence, this research is pivotal in informing decision makers and continuing research in this area.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article

Tashfeen Ahmad, Ruba Aljafari and Viswanath Venkatesh

Realizing value from information and communication technology (ICT) in procurement in developing countries is complex due to diverse stakeholders and intertwined…

Abstract

Purpose

Realizing value from information and communication technology (ICT) in procurement in developing countries is complex due to diverse stakeholders and intertwined procurement processes. The purpose of this paper is to examine the experience of the Government of Jamaica in leveraging ICTs as an intervention to transform its procurement operations and combat corruption.

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines conversations with employees in the Government of Jamaica to understand key milestones in its procurement history. Based on the view that the intervention context is an ecosystem where multiple and inconsistent views of the e-procurement system evolve over time, the study analyzes milestones to reveal key actions that contributed either to the initial success of or introduced challenges to the e-procurement system.

Findings

The findings suggest that inducing positive sentiments about the intervention through transparency will overcome a long history of negative sentiments about the initiatives of government bodies in general. Furthermore, positive sentiments may not be directly related to the e-procurement system.

Research limitations/implications

The study offers important insights that government bodies in similar contexts can apply to guide initiatives for transforming procurement operations. For instance, training should emphasize not only the technical aspects of the system from the perspective of different stakeholders but also their job descriptions. Future research may examine other initiatives in developing countries to compare the role of sentiments over time.

Originality/value

The study adopts a unique approach to understand the experience of a developing country in harnessing ICTs to transform procurement operations.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Article

Raymond Saner and Lichia Yiu

The purpose of this paper is to assess how far Jamaica has come regarding women economic empowerment, female entrepreneurship and its development policies in favour of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess how far Jamaica has come regarding women economic empowerment, female entrepreneurship and its development policies in favour of women entrepreneurship development.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study employs a mixed method approach to achieve its research objectives, consisting of literature review and corroboration with existing database and indices. Key insights of research on female entrepreneurship are used to reflect on published data to assess progress of female entrepreneurship development in Jamaica. The 2017 editions of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor and Gender Entrepreneurship and Development Index were examined to gain a better understanding of how the Jamaican business environment has progressed or regressed over time and how the economic development and business environment impact female participation in Jamaica’s labour force and entrepreneurial initiatives.

Findings

The economic conditions in Jamaica and the role of females as domestic caregiver have made it difficult for women to enter the labour force even though Jamaican women are relatively better educated than men. Women remain at a disadvantage in the labour force. Jamaica’s legislation and budget allocations in favour of female entrepreneurship are analysed to identify where and how Jamaica is investing its efforts to improve women’s participation in the labour force. The authors conclude with suggestions on how the Jamaican government could facilitate further women entrepreneurship development to reach a more gender balanced inclusive socio-economic development.

Originality/value

While global policy has been promoting women empowerment through entrepreneurial development, little is known on the actual outcome of such human capital investment strategy and the critical vectors that contribute to such outcome. This scarcity of knowledge is also applicable to Jamaica. This paper attempts to contribute to women entrepreneurship research by reaching beyond the output-oriented perspective of various skill development programmes and attempts to link policy choice with overall macro results of entrepreneurship development in general and women entrepreneurship development in specific. The study thus provides a rare glimpse of the entrepreneurship ecosystem in Jamaica.

Details

Public Administration and Policy, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1727-2645

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Article

Lloyd Waller and Aldrane Genius

This study aims to highlight the barriers inhibiting the implementation of initiatives that seek to transform the efficiency, effectiveness and service delivery of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to highlight the barriers inhibiting the implementation of initiatives that seek to transform the efficiency, effectiveness and service delivery of government processes and systems through the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs, e-Government) in Jamaica.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used for this study was “Qualitative Description”. Qualitative Description is guided by the Qualitative Descriptive Research Design and is epistemologically located within the Interpretivist Paradigm. The data collected for this study were based on the principle of judgmental sampling. In total, 23 experts working at various levels of e-Government implementation in Jamaica were interviewed for this study.

Findings

It can be argued from the data analyzed that the factors which undermine the use of ICTs to improve government efficiency, effectiveness and public service delivery in Jamaica include: technical issues (ICT infrastructure, privacy and security), social issues (culture and the digital divide) and financial issues. Organizational issues such as top management support, resistance to change to electronic ways, lack of collaboration, lack of qualified personnel and training courses were not identified as barriers to e-Government in Jamaica.

Research limitations/implications

The direct implications of the study are confined to the shores of Jamaica.

Practical implications

This study provides government agencies in Jamaica with an opportunity to identify the practical gaps in e-Government implementation. At the global level, the study provides international development agencies that are currently funding, and those that have an interest in funding e-Government initiatives in Jamaica, with an understanding of the challenges to e-Government implementation in the country. Additionally, the study provides an opportunity for scholars doing cross-national qualitative study to compare and contrast the e-Government barriers identified in Jamaica with other countries and to further determine factors which may contribute to these similarities and differences and explore a possible holistic solution to these barriers.

Social implications

The study draws attention to the problem of exclusion for those citizens affected by the digital divide, the problem of infrastructure and/or structural challenges such as poverty and are unable to access e-Government services. The study also highlights the problem of trust in the government by Jamaican citizens and the implication of this trust issue for e-Government implementation in the country.

Originality/value

The study addresses the global scholarly and policy gap in the literature, as it relates to Caribbean experiences with barriers to e-Government implementation and, therefore, provides data for global comparative analysis. The study also contributes to global attempts to holistically understand the e-Government phenomenon by extending the current discourse to the Caribbean.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article

Machel Anthony Emanuel, Andre Yone Haughton and K’adamawe K’nife

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of legislative amendments to the Dangerous Drugs Act in 2015 and the establishment of a Cannabis Licensing Authority…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of legislative amendments to the Dangerous Drugs Act in 2015 and the establishment of a Cannabis Licensing Authority (CLA) in Jamaica as the first Caribbean country to decriminalize cannabis and attempt to establish a medical cannabis industry. The research also attempts to understand the perception of key industry players and interest groups to the existing regulatory framework in Jamaica.

Design/methodology/approach

The research reviews local and global trends, the developments in cannabis legislation and conducts questionnaires as well as semi-structured interviews to get feedback from key industry stakeholders and interest groups.

Findings

The findings suggest that there is a lack of confidence in the CLA in Jamaica, who are faced with the task of balancing the emerging medical cannabis industry and formalizing the existing illegal cannabis trade. There appears to be inconsistencies and lack of coordination between the associated ministries, departments and agencies. The CLA in Jamaica has established two separate cannabis models that appear to be incoherent in their approach to policy. On the one hand they are regulating cultivation, processing and supply, and on the other hand, the law remains unclear about the purchase or consumption of cannabis and its by-products.

Practical implications

Countries must learn from Jamaica’s experience if they wish to effectively establish a medical cannabis industry and legitimize existing illegal cannabis economic activities. These countries must ensure they tailor fit the approach of their CLAs to minimize any negative perception from industry players. Laws established to facilitate linkages from the cultivation to processing to packaging to transportation to retail must also include clear laws surrounding the purchase and consumption of cannabis. Jamaica has a far way to go and must continue to learn from other countries and states, for example, Holland, Spain and Uruguay, while at the same time learning from itself.

Originality/value

This paper is novel as it addresses the transition of the legislative process in Jamaica. It also serves as lesson for other countries that seek to engage in the development of their cannabis industries.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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