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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi and Farid Gharibi

Accreditation is an essential component in primary healthcare (PHC) systems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the most suitable PHC accreditation models and…

Abstract

Purpose

Accreditation is an essential component in primary healthcare (PHC) systems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the most suitable PHC accreditation models and standards, worldwide, and to prepare a comprehensive and unbiased summary from research on these models.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search was undertaken using Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, Springer, PubMed and ProQuest databases in August 2016 and updated in January 2018. English language studies addressing PHC accreditation standards and models, published between 1995 and January 2018, were included, resulting in 9051 citations. After excluding duplicates and irrelevant studies, 19 were included in the final review. Two independent reviewers critically appraised the studies. Consequently, accreditation standards in the models were extracted and compared.

Findings

Results indicate that USA, Australia, Canada, UK and New Zealand (non-eastern Mediterranean regions (EMR)) and Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon and Egypt (EMR) had well-developed and high-quality PHC accreditation models. The Jordanian, Egyptian and Saudi models had the highest diversity in their PHC standards domains. Community-oriented care, safe care, high-quality care, care continuity and human resource management had the highest priority among PHC accreditation programs.

Originality/value

The authors provide PHC accreditation benchmarks and determine high priority practical domains in accreditation standards. The findings should help health system managers and policymakers design new PHC accreditation programs and promote PHC service quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi, Leila Nikniaz, Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani, Mostafa Farahbakhsh and Zeinab Nikniaz

The purpose of this paper is to determine the food safety knowledge and practices of the Iranian consumers and also its association with socio-demographic characteristics.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the food safety knowledge and practices of the Iranian consumers and also its association with socio-demographic characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

In the present cross-sectional and population-based study, the validated food safety questionnaires applied to 1,500 participants who were selected through multistage stratified cluster sampling from the capital city and regional area of East-Azerbaijan – Iran. The Student t-test and analysis of variance and linear regression were used for statistical analysis.

Findings

Although the overall percentages of mean score for knowledge (77.66 percent) and self-reported practice (70.77 percent) were good, there was a low level of awareness and self-reported practice in some subsections such as optimal heating/cooling temperature, proper thawing techniques and eating raw egg. Female and married respondents had significantly higher mean knowledge score than males (p<0.001) and singles (p=0.04). Residents of regional areas acted more safely than capital city residents (p=0.01).

Research limitations/implications

Despite the good knowledge of some respondents regarding food safety, their food safety practices were poor. It can thus be suggested that the future studies have better focus on investigating the perceived barriers of consumers about food safety practices.

Practical implications

Although the mean knowledge and practice regarding food safety of Iranian consumers was good, yet there is the lack of knowledge and practice on some important factors related to food poisonings such as eating raw or lightly cooked egg or improper heating/thawing practices. So, it is important to develop proper food safety education programs emphasizing on these issues. According to lower food safety knowledge and practice of low-educated, single and male respondents, the educational programs should mainly focus on these groups.

Originality/value

For the development of effective food safety education programs in Iran, learning about the basic knowledge and practice of consumers is essential; however, there is limited data that directly tackles this issue in Iran.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Ebrahim Ahmadi, Mohammad Mosaferi, Leila Nikniaz, Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi, Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi, Gholamhoseyn Safari and Mina Bargar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the quality of the frying oil used in restaurants, fast food establishments, and confectionary stores. The compliance of used…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the quality of the frying oil used in restaurants, fast food establishments, and confectionary stores. The compliance of used frying oils with the quality standards as determined by the peroxide value (PV) and the total polar materials (TPMs) is investigated by analyzing 375 samples of oil.

Design/methodology/approach

The PV was measured according to the national standard procedure number 4179, while the TPM was determined using a Testo 270 cooking oil tester. Frying oils with a PV>5 mEq/kg and a TPM>25 percent were considered to be non-edible. For a comparison of groups, the Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation tests were used, and p<0.05 was considered significant.

Findings

The maximum TPM and PV recorded for frying oils in fast food restaurants were 97.5 percent and 77.9 mEq/kg, respectively. The results also revealed that 60 percent of samples were non-edible according to the TPM, while 58.9 percent of the oil samples were non-edible because of the PV. TPM and PV correlated well with each other (r=0.99, p<0.001) and with oil replacement intervals (r=0.90, p<0.001). The relationship between the TPM and PV was stronger in the polynomial model than the linear model. The following equation was obtained: peroxide (mEq/kg oil)=0.0043 TPM2 (%)+0.1587 TPM (%)–0.6152.

Originality/value

Considering the current limitations in official supervision by health authority, on-site self-monitoring of the TPM using the Testo 270 cooking oil tester by sellers as a solution seems a new approach. Food stores, restaurants, and confectionary stores should be equipped with TPM analyzers to determine the quality of the frying oil and the timely replacement of non-edible oils.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi, Mohammad Saadati, Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani, Ali Ebadi and Samad E.J. Golzari

Clinical governance should be based on cultural elements that value lifelong learning, skill development and research. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a set of…

Abstract

Purpose

Clinical governance should be based on cultural elements that value lifelong learning, skill development and research. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a set of indicators to improve educational governance in hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Key indicators were identified from the international and national literatures. Later, the indicators were rated and prioritized by a multidisciplinary panel of medical professionals using two rounds of Delphi technique. Subsequently at two consensus meetings, the panel evaluated the indicators.

Findings

A set of 51 draft indicators were identified. The expert panel members rated 28 indicators as high priority indicators for measuring educational performance of the hospitals.

Practical implications

This set of indicators can be used to measure the educational performance of the hospitals in identifying the gaps and take steps to resolve them.

Originality/value

Education and training is the basic component of clinical governance. Hospital staff education and training is a fundamental step towards organizational and individual development. To improve the educational performance at hospital level it is necessary to reliably measure such performance. This can be done through developing and using relevant indicators. There are limited systematic studies, especially in middle and low income countries, to introduce appropriate indicators. This study has investigated developing a set of indicators to measure and improve the educational performance in hospitals.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani, Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi, Mohammad Saadati, Roya Hassanzadeh and Gisoo Alizadeh

Clinical governance (CG) was used as a driver to improve safety and quality of healthcare. CG implementing is a change in health system and all the stakeholders must be…

Abstract

Purpose

Clinical governance (CG) was used as a driver to improve safety and quality of healthcare. CG implementing is a change in health system and all the stakeholders must be participating. The purpose of this paper is to study nurses’ experience about CG movement in Tabriz hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study using Focus Group Discussions (FGD) was done. Purposeful Sampling was used to select the objectives including 65 participants. Actually seven FGD’s were held. Content analysis was used to extract the meaningful themes.

Findings

It is revealed that nurses are the focal point in CG implementation in hospitals. Low commitment of managers and lack of physicians’ contribution was experienced by nurses. However, personnel education and development and patient safety have got more attention. Blame culture and increased work stress was reported as challenges.

Originality/value

CG as a change in healthcare system, especially in low- and middle-income countries, is faced by several challenges and its implementation would have different experiences. Nursing staff, the major group in hospitals, would be having interesting experiences through CG. Their practical opinions could guide the policy makers to employ proper plans to effectively implement CG. Considering the result of this study in practice would lead to improve CG implementation.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

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