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Article

Sungcho Kim, Jaeyong Sung and Jongwook Choi

The two‐dimensional flow field is numerically investigated using a compact finite difference and a pseudo‐spectral method when two fluids with different physical…

Abstract

The two‐dimensional flow field is numerically investigated using a compact finite difference and a pseudo‐spectral method when two fluids with different physical properties are mixing under gravity as well as flow rate. The gravity and the viscous mobility affect the fingering instability, i.e. the mixing range shrinks much at the large viscous mobility or the strong gravity. When the gravitation acts parallel to the main stream, the flow decelerates or accelerates according to its direction. The fingertip velocity is exactly expressed by a pure cosine function and especially invariant when the gravity acts along the −y direction at the high Peclet number. The maximum and fingertip velocities at the very low Peclet number are nearly symmetric with respect to the −y direction perpendicular to the main flow direction x. When the gravity acts along the −y direction, the flow field shows the asymmetry, and a pair of vortices is generated at both the very high Peclet number and less viscous mobility number. As the viscous mobility becomes large, the vortex scale enlarges at the small Peclet number, while the vortices are slightly destroyed at the relatively high Peclet number. As the gravitational angle changes clockwise from downstream to upstream, a pair of vortices evolves through a process of asymmetry.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Book part

Jaeyong Song, Paul Almeida and Geraldine Wu

Does the mobility of engineers facilitate international knowledge spillovers and help newly industrializing countries catch up with developed countries? This study…

Abstract

Does the mobility of engineers facilitate international knowledge spillovers and help newly industrializing countries catch up with developed countries? This study attempts to answer this question by tracing knowledge flows through the international mobility of semiconductor engineers. The paper uses patent data to track the mobility paths of engineers to examine whether knowledge flows occurred more than expected. The study finds that engineers who moved from the U.S. to Korea or Taiwan built their subsequent innovations based upon the knowledge of their previous firms in the U.S. Case studies based on field interviews further suggest that these mobile engineers have played significant roles in the technological catching-up of Korea and Taiwan.

Details

Comparative Studies of Technological Evolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-118-7

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