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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2001

Jaeyong Song, Paul Almeida and Geraldine Wu

Does the mobility of engineers facilitate international knowledge spillovers and help newly industrializing countries catch up with developed countries? This study…

Abstract

Does the mobility of engineers facilitate international knowledge spillovers and help newly industrializing countries catch up with developed countries? This study attempts to answer this question by tracing knowledge flows through the international mobility of semiconductor engineers. The paper uses patent data to track the mobility paths of engineers to examine whether knowledge flows occurred more than expected. The study finds that engineers who moved from the U.S. to Korea or Taiwan built their subsequent innovations based upon the knowledge of their previous firms in the U.S. Case studies based on field interviews further suggest that these mobile engineers have played significant roles in the technological catching-up of Korea and Taiwan.

Details

Comparative Studies of Technological Evolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-118-7

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Yuzhe Miao, Soonkyoo Choe and Jaeyong Song

The purpose of this paper is to explore organizational factors that affect the transfer of subsidiary knowledge to both parent companies and peer subsidiaries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore organizational factors that affect the transfer of subsidiary knowledge to both parent companies and peer subsidiaries.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested using multivariate regression, based on a survey of 81 foreign subsidiaries in South Korea.

Findings

The findings show that organizational factors that affect the transfer of subsidiary knowledge differ according to whether the recipient is the parent or the peer subsidiary. Subsidiary‐to‐parent knowledge flow is facilitated by establishing efficient formal mechanisms such as an expatriation policy, a subsidiary performance evaluation system, etc., whereas knowledge transfer to peer subsidiaries is enhanced by the length of a subsidiary's operation period and the frequency of its managers' communications with other managers in peer subsidiaries.

Practical implications

This analysis suggests that managers of multinational companies should apply different approaches in managing these two distinct knowledge flow patterns in the MNC network.

Originality/value

This study offers new insights into the challenges of global learning by highlighting the difficulty of transferring subsidiary knowledge to peer subsidiaries through formal organizational apparatuses.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2001

Abstract

Details

Comparative Studies of Technological Evolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-118-7

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Comparative Studies of Technological Evolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-118-7

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2008

Raj Aggarwal, Victor Petrovic, John K. Ryans and Sijing Zong

Based on fifteen years of data on the annual Academy of International Business (AIB) best dissertation Farmer Award finalists, we find that these dissertations were done…

Abstract

Based on fifteen years of data on the annual Academy of International Business (AIB) best dissertation Farmer Award finalists, we find that these dissertations were done at a range of North American universities. Interestingly, dissertation topics differed from the topics covered in the three top IB journals with five‐sixths of the topics in management, organization, economics, or finance and two‐thirds set in a single country or region (U.S., Japan, North America, and Western Europe). Survey research is the most common methodology but analysis of secondary data is growing. As expected, the finalists are on average an extraordinarily prolific group.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

Jaeyong Choi

The purpose of this paper is to examine if global and situational support for police use of force vary across first-generation immigrants, second-generation immigrants and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine if global and situational support for police use of force vary across first-generation immigrants, second-generation immigrants and native-born Americans.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on data from the 2012 General Social Survey, multivariate logistic regression models are performed to predict each of the three binary outcome variables (e.g. support for police use of reasonable force or excessive force) depending on immigrant generation status.

Findings

Results indicate that, compared with native-born individuals, first-generation immigrants express less global support for police use of force and less support for police use of reasonable force. In contrast, the first-generation group is more supportive of police use of excessive force compared to the second-generation group and native-born group.

Originality/value

Much research on immigrants’ perceptions of the police has yielded conflicting findings. Part of the reason has been attributed to failure to distinguish first-generation immigrants from successive generations of immigrants. The present study fills a gap in this line of research by assessing the extent to which there is a disparity in support for police use of force between different generations of immigrants and native-born individuals.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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