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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2018

Jiyoung Kim, Hae-Ryong Kim, Russell Lacey and Jaebeom Suh

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how frontline service employees’ (FSEs) perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) can enhance meaningful work…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how frontline service employees’ (FSEs) perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) can enhance meaningful work perceptions as well as help alleviate FSEs’ perceptions of verbal dysfunctional customer behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model is empirically examined through a survey of 306 FSEs of a large insurance company in South Korea and tested via structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that FSEs’ perceptions of CSR are negatively related to their perceptions of verbal dysfunctional customer conduct, which in turn is shown to be directly linked to emotional exhaustion. FSEs’ CSR perceptions strengthen their view that they are performing meaningful work (i.e. perceived task significance), which in turn strengthens their job satisfaction.

Practical implications

CSR has a preventive effect on workplace stress reduction, as FSE perceptions of CSR may help them cope with the emotional fatigue of dealing with dysfunctional customer behavior. CSR also provides a needs fulfillment effect, as FSEs’ perceptions of CSR foster perceived task significance and helps reduce their emotional exhaustion from work.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the potential impact of CSR within the context of FSEs’ boundary spanning emotional labor.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Hyun Seung Jin, Gayle Kerr and Jaebeom Suh

The creativity-based facilitation effect, well documented by previous research, shows that creative advertisements (ads) are more memorable than regular (or less creative…

Abstract

Purpose

The creativity-based facilitation effect, well documented by previous research, shows that creative advertisements (ads) are more memorable than regular (or less creative) ads, that is, creativity facilitates memory. This current research aims to extend our understanding by investigating the impact of creativity on regular ads and competitive advertising. It examines whether creative ads impair the memorability of regular ads to determine whether a “creativity-based impairment effect” exists.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 tested creativity-based impairment effects in brand recall. Experiment 2 replicated and validated the impairment effect in recall, using a different presentation order of ads. In Experiment 3, effects of creative ads on competing vs non-competing brands were examined.

Findings

Results found that creative ads impaired the brand recall of regular ads, creative ads impaired the recall of competing brands more than non-competing brands and creative ads were recalled earlier in top-of-mind recall positions.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may look at whether different memory measures (e.g. recognition), different proportions of creative ads, and ads of familiar vs unfamiliar brands produce differential impairment effects.

Practical implications

One suggestion from this research could be to not only copy-test your own brand’s advertising, but also test the advertising of other brands so that the target ad’s relative levels of creativity can be assessed before media buying. As a result of this testing, when the brand identifies any potential impairment effects, the identified creative ads could then be tracked in terms of media placement, providing a guide of where “not to schedule” advertising.

Originality/value

This research makes an important theoretical contribution as the first to explore impairment effects in the context of creative advertising. In doing so, it offers important managerial insights for regular and competitive advertising.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Jaebeom Suh, Swinder Janda and Sunhee Seo

The purpose of this study is to explore how customers from different cultures develop trust with service providers to uncover underlying dimensions of trust development…

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2938

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how customers from different cultures develop trust with service providers to uncover underlying dimensions of trust development for customers from different cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilizes semi‐structured phenomenological depth interviews to explore the role of culture in the development of trust with service providers.

Findings

Customers' direct service experiences in their native culture and in the culture where they reside (in this study the USA), as well as recommendations from others appear to be the major determinants of trust. Furthermore, a customer's trust in a recommender seems to transfer over to a service provider.

Research limitations/implications

Because all informants were from one foreign culture (Korean), the findings related to primarily this group. Further generalization of these findings should only be made after studies conducted with informants from other foreign cultures.

Practical implications

Service organizations need to offer their employees training that emphasizes strategies oriented toward building and maintaining trust with customers from different cultural backgrounds in order to better read customers from different cultural backgrounds and to effectively react to their complaints.

Originality/value

The most unique part of trust development for Koreans who have lived in the USA would be the transference process. They seem to trust service providers or service organizations based on the recommendations related to specific service categories. Once trust is established in recommenders, it seems to naturally result in a transference process (e.g. trust transference from service provider to service organization).

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Michael A. Jones and Jaebeom Suh

The distinction between transaction‐specific satisfaction and overall satisfaction has received little empirical attention in the satisfaction and services literature…

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8594

Abstract

The distinction between transaction‐specific satisfaction and overall satisfaction has received little empirical attention in the satisfaction and services literature. Furthermore, a review of the extant literature provides mixed conceptual evidence concerning the relationships among transaction‐specific satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and repurchase intentions. This study empirically investigates transaction‐specific satisfaction, overall satisfaction and repurchase intentions, and finds that the two types of satisfaction can be distinguished from one another. Furthermore, the findings from this study suggest that overall satisfaction has a direct influence on repurchase intentions as well as a moderating influence on the transaction‐specific satisfaction/repurchase intentions relationship. When overall satisfaction is high, transaction‐specific satisfaction has little impact on repurchase intentions, but when overall satisfaction is low, transaction‐specific satisfaction has a positive influence on repurchase intentions.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Mahn Hee Yoon, Sharon E. Beatty and Jaebeom Suh

This paper examines several work climate variables and their impact on service quality. While there exists a variety of work climates relevant to contact employees during…

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6186

Abstract

This paper examines several work climate variables and their impact on service quality. While there exists a variety of work climates relevant to contact employees during service encounters, this study investigates two components for successful implementation of internal marketing, service climate and supportive management. Both climate variables are proposed to affect the attitudes and behaviors of employees, and consequently affect customers’ perceptions of employees’ service performance. This study, which combines perceptions from customers and their contact employees, shows that both climate variables contribute directly to job satisfaction and work effort, and indirectly impact on customers’ perceptions of employee service quality. Also, the empirical results indicate that in addition to job satisfaction, employees’ work effort also plays a strong, central role in determining customers’ perceptions of employee service quality.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Dong‐Jin Lee, Moonkyu Lee and Jaebeom Suh

This research aims to test a model that proposes potential antecedents and consequences of an importer's benevolence towards its foreign export supplier. The model posits…

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1706

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to test a model that proposes potential antecedents and consequences of an importer's benevolence towards its foreign export supplier. The model posits that an importer's satisfaction with and commitment to its relationship with a foreign export supplier have a positive impact on its benevolence towards the exporter, which in turn positively influences the performance of the dyadic relationship. The model also suggests that the effect of the importer's relationship satisfaction on benevolence is moderated by value similarity and cultural familiarity.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested through a mail survey of US importers who bought from foreign exporters.

Findings

The results largely support the model. The findings of this study also indicate that the importer's relationship satisfaction has a significant influence on benevolence only when cultural familiarity is high.

Practical implications

Strategic implications for international marketers are discussed.

Originality/value

The model proposed has value for marketing professionals.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Marek Gnusowski

This paper aims to improve the service discipline’s understanding of the unique challenges and opportunities that services marketers encounter in Central, Eastern and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve the service discipline’s understanding of the unique challenges and opportunities that services marketers encounter in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe (CESEE) and Post-Soviet states. This paper also serves as an introduction to the special section about services marketing perspectives in this region.

Design/methodology/approach

Considering the Post-Soviet reality, the paper is a viewpoint regarding the specific development potential of services marketing in the CESEE region. In addition, the three papers included in the special section use a variety of research methods, participants and service settings.

Findings

First, this paper outlines the positive and negative consequences of the radical changes in the services markets over the past 30 years. Next, all three papers included in the special section explore the distinctive customer perspective of services marketing. Finally, this paper discusses the specific relationship building environment of the Post-Soviet reality and how its unique do-it-yourself background contributes to the existing discussion on consumers’ involvement in the co-creation of value.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this special section have valuable implications for future research on services marketing in the CESEE markets, although these may not always be generalizable beyond the unique context of the research detailed in each of these papers.

Practical implications

This research, along with the three papers, presents some useful directions for services marketing managers cooperating with the CESEE markets, such as understanding and managing the expectations of their customers or employees.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first attempts to understand the uniqueness of the under-researched area of services marketing in the CESEE and Post-Soviet States, both from a theoretical and empirical point of view. This also provides previously under-represented authors from the region the opportunity to present their perspective to an international service community.

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Farid Ahmed, Felicitas Evangelista and Daniela Spanjaard

Relationship marketing has been playing an important role in the development of marketing theory and practice. Though the concept has been extensively applied in…

Abstract

Purpose

Relationship marketing has been playing an important role in the development of marketing theory and practice. Though the concept has been extensively applied in international marketing in understanding the dynamics of exporter-importer relationships, few studies have looked at dyadic data to investigate the impact of mutuality of relational variables on the exporter-importer relationships. The objective of this study is to understand the impact of mutuality of key relational variables on exporter-importer relationship performance. A dyadic model of mutuality is proposed. The model highlights the impact of balance, level and quality of perceptual bi-directionality of relational variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested using dyadic data collected from exporter-importer relationships involving Australian exporters and their Southeast Asian import partners through a cross-sectional, quantitative survey. Mutuality of relationship constructs was measured using the perceptual bi-directionality (PBD) method.

Findings

The results support the central hypothesis that mutuality of relational constructs has an impact on relationship performance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to apply the perceptual bi-directionality method to measure mutuality of relational constructs in an exporter-importer setting. The study contributes to the general understanding of international business and exporter-importer relationship performance in particular.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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