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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2011

Nicole K. Lee, Jacqui Cameron, Angela Harney and Sandra Roeg

Dissemination of good practice information to practitioners is one of the great challenges of the substance abuse treatment sector. The authors' understanding of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Dissemination of good practice information to practitioners is one of the great challenges of the substance abuse treatment sector. The authors' understanding of the process by which research is translated is limited, but a whole of workforce approach is considered best practice. This paper aims to examine organisational change as a result of a workforce capacity‐building program over six months.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 195 staff (nine service managers, 39 supervisors and 147 clinicians) in 13 alcohol and other drug (AOD) services across Australia participated in mental health screening and brief intervention training using PsyCheck. PsyCheck is designed to detect and address common mental health symptoms among drug treatment clients. The Dual Diagnosis Capability in Addiction Treatment (DDCAT) index was used to measure capacity before and after training.

Findings

There was no significant difference between baseline and follow‐up DDCAT scores; however, the level of PsyCheck implementation indicated improvement in DDCAT scores.

Practical implications

The results show that where organisations implement the program successfully, capacity improves; where the program is not well implemented, capacity reduces. Successful implementers report a number of common elements: the screening tool was implemented into routine assessment; there was a single onsite “champion” supporting the implementation; and they worked with the staff and persisted with the implementation even where there was initial worker resistance.

Originality/value

This paper provides the opportunity to assess workforce capacity building and the feasibility of utilising the DCCAT to measure co‐occurring mental health and substance use disorders in Australian AOD services.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Linda Jenner, Jacqui Cameron, Nicole K. Lee and Suzanne Nielsen

– The purpose of this paper is to examine test-retest reliability of the PsyCheck screening tool.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine test-retest reliability of the PsyCheck screening tool.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 50 drug users in their first three months of treatment were given the Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ; PsyCheck version) at two time points between five and nine days apart to examine reliability of the screen over time.

Findings

Results suggest that the SRQ (PsyCheck version) has good test-retest reliability. ICC=0.841 (p=0.000) showed strong agreement between time 1 and time 2.

Practical implications

The study confirms that the SRQ (PsyCheck) is a stable and reliable instrument for use within drug treatment settings. The implications of the use of screening tools not validated within alcohol and drug treatment setting are discussed.

Originality/value

Mental health problems, particularly anxiety and mood disorders, are common among clients of alcohol and drug treatment services and alcohol and drug workers often undertake symptom management of high prevalence disorders. The originality of this study is that the PsyCheck screening tool was designed for use by non-mental health specialists to detect common mental health problems.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Jacqui Cameron, Nicole K. Lee, Heidi Strickland and Michael Livingston

The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of introducing clinical case management into a youth alcohol and other drug treatment setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of introducing clinical case management into a youth alcohol and other drug treatment setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Case management as usual (CMAU), the current brokerage model operating as a control group was compared to clinical case management (CCM). Individual client outcomes were compared with the site as the grouping variable.

Findings

Although alcohol and drug outcomes were similar, arguably slightly favouring the intervention group, results suggest that young people receiving clinical case management showed potentially greater improvement across a range of other health outcomes including mental health, treatment utilisation and social outcomes than the CMAU brokerage model.

Practical implications

The study examined the feasibility of training clinicians in a youth alcohol and drug treatment agency in a clinical case management model and examined whether this more intensive case management approach could improve substance use and mental health outcomes for young people.

Originality/value

Although widely used, much less is known about the efficacy of case management within substance use treatment settings, where case management tends to be loosely defined and encompasses a broad range of activities. The originality of this study is that little is known about the effectiveness of case management in youth services, where it tends to be the primary service offered.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

Nicole K. Lee, Ann Roche, Vinita Duraisingam, Jane A. Fischer and Jacqui Cameron

– The purpose of this paper is to identify mental health interventions within male-dominated industries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify mental health interventions within male-dominated industries.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was undertaken, examining mental health interventions within male-dominated industries. Major electronic databases, grey literature and reference lists for English language studies published January 1990-June 2012 were searched. Independent extraction of the studies was completed by two reviewers using predefined data fields including study quality measures.

Findings

Five studies met inclusion criteria. The available evidence suggests that effective interventions to address anxiety and depression in male-dominated industries include: improving mental health literacy and knowledge, increasing social support, improving access to treatment, providing education for managers and addressing workload issues.

Practical implications

Working conditions and the workplace can have a significant impact on a worker's mental health. Work-related factors including working conditions, job demands and social support in the workplace are particularly important for the mental health workers. Indeed, poor work conditions have been associated with poorer mental health outcomes in particular anxiety and depression, however, little work has been conducted on mental health interventions in the workplace and further the impact on male-dominated industries.

Originality/value

Overall, the body of evidence supporting effective interventions for mental health problems among workers in male-dominated industries is limited. Nonetheless, the evidence does suggest that mental health interventions in male-dominated industries is logistically feasible and can have some positive impact on the mental health of workers, particularly for high prevalence low severity disorders such as anxiety and depression.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Gail Gilchrist, Jacqui Cameron, Susan Nicolson, Megan Galbally and Paddy Moore

Perinatal drug users are a marginalized group at risk of depression and parenting stress. This study aims to inform service development by determining key components…

Abstract

Purpose

Perinatal drug users are a marginalized group at risk of depression and parenting stress. This study aims to inform service development by determining key components needed to reduce depression among this population by triangulating data from qualitative interviews with service users and their care providers.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre and post natal in‐depth qualitative interviews with drug users attending a specialist antenatal clinic in Melbourne, Australia, and their care providers were conducted; and an email survey of experts was undertaken. Twenty‐eight interviews were conducted and the views of ten experts were received. Data from these sources were triangulated to determine the key components of an intervention to reduce depression among perinatal drug users.

Findings

There was high concordance among data sources. Key service components identified were: case management; extended postnatal care; access to mental health services and drug treatment including relapse prevention; parenting support, and housing support. Judgmental attitudes from healthcare staff and the fear of child protection may be barriers to accessing services.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings are limited by the small sample size.

Practical implications

Services should be enhanced in pregnancy and the early parenting years to build a service model that incorporates the key components identified in this study and supported in the literature.

Originality/value

The originality and value of this study is that it determines the key service components needed to reduce depression among perinatal drug users by triangulating their experiences and views, that of their care providers and expert opinion.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Abstract

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Sharon Mavin, Patricia Bryans and Rosie Cunningham

The purpose of this paper is to highlight gendered media constructions which discourage women's acceptability as political leaders and trivialise or ignore their contribution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight gendered media constructions which discourage women's acceptability as political leaders and trivialise or ignore their contribution.

Design/methodology/approach

Media analysis of UK newspapers, government web sites, worldwide web relating to the UK 2010 government election, women MPs and in particular representations of Harriet Harman and Theresa May.

Findings

Media constructions of UK women political leaders are gendered and powerful in messaging women's (un)acceptability as leaders against embedded stereotypes. Being invisible via tokenism and yet spotlighted on the basis of their gender, media constructions trivialize their contribution, thus detracting from their credibility as leaders.

Research limitations/implications

UK‐based study grounded in opportune “snapshot” media analysis during election and resultant formation of UK coalition Government. Focus on two women political leaders, results may not be generalisable.

Practical implications

Raises awareness of the numerical minority status of UK women political leaders, the invisibility‐visibility contradiction and the power of the media to construct women leaders against gender stereotypes. Call for continued challenge to gendered leader stereotypes and women's representation in UK political leadership.

Originality/value

Highlights power of media to perpetuate gender stereotypes of UK women political leaders.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Heather Cameron and Jacqui Limberger

Faced with a unique problem of providing cross‐cultural awareness training on a continuing basis, Griffith University, located in Brisbane, Queensland developed an…

Abstract

Faced with a unique problem of providing cross‐cultural awareness training on a continuing basis, Griffith University, located in Brisbane, Queensland developed an innovative program to meet the challenges it faced. A key strategy in the University's Indigenous Recruitment Strategy was to establish a cross‐cultural awareness program sensitising university staff to employment matters affecting indigenous Australians. The reality of developing, implementing and sustaining such a program meant that factors that operate in any large organisation, particularly where flexibility in releasing staff to participate in staff development programs is limited, were particularly problematic. The end product, “Please Explain: Indirect Discrimination in the Workplace”, has translated the concepts of cross‐cultural awareness, traditionally expressed through verbal means, into a staff development resource accessible in multiple formats: print, online, video and audio. The project is an excellent example of how unique solutions can be found to tackle seemingly insurmountable problems, and of how the completely different arenas of information communication technology, staff development, cross‐cultural awareness and anti‐discrimination training can come together in synergistic reality.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Sarah Pedersen

Abstract

Details

The Politicization of Mumsnet
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-468-2

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

C. Warren

Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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