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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Jacques Verville and Alannah Halingten

Discusses the acquisition team formation, the interdisciplinary nature of the teams and the roles of the steering committee, MIS, purchasing and users for an ERP solution…

Abstract

Discusses the acquisition team formation, the interdisciplinary nature of the teams and the roles of the steering committee, MIS, purchasing and users for an ERP solution. The goal of the paper in presenting these is to make you aware that the composition of the acquisition teams is a critical factor that affects the acquisition process.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Ramaraj Palanisamy, Jacques Verville and Nazim Taskin

As the wrong Enterprise Software (ES) acquisition can lead an organization with chronically exceeded budgets and settling for minimum returns, so can an unfavorable…

Abstract

Purpose

As the wrong Enterprise Software (ES) acquisition can lead an organization with chronically exceeded budgets and settling for minimum returns, so can an unfavorable contractual agreement. Often the acquiring organizations become vulnerable to risks and mistakes as the software contracts are habitually written using legal terminologies and mainly to the advantage of the vendor. To avoid costly ES contracting mistakes, the purpose of this paper is to empirically identify the critical success factors (CSFs) of contracting in the context of ES acquisition.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted to gather the data for this study. Statistical analysis conducted for this study include descriptive statistics, factor analysis with reliability and validity tests and nonparametric test.

Findings

The five key factors are: contractual assurance, forward compatibility and licensing; right to use, own and use of own, confidentiality and payment; software acceptance; license assignment; and vendor obligation for intellectual property. The research and managerial implications of these factors are given in discussion.

Research limitations/implications

As with most empirical studies, the subjectivity of the opinion of respondents from only two industries presents some limitations to generalization. Another limitation is the respondent has been asked for the degree of criticality for each of the contracting issue given in the questionnaire. There could be critical issues other than the listed ones which are more specific to the organization.

Practical implications

The results can be used by managers to improve their understanding on the critical contractual issues in ES acquisition negotiations.

Originality/value

The significant value of this study identifies the CSFs for ES contract negotiations while acquiring the software.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Ramaraj Palanisamy, Jacques Verville, Christine Bernadas and Nazim Taskin

The purpose of this paper is to understand the decision process of enterprise software acquisition. The research aims to focus on identifying significant influences on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the decision process of enterprise software acquisition. The research aims to focus on identifying significant influences on enterprise software acquisition decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

As a research model and theoretical background, the organizational buying model (OBB) is proposed for the acquisition of enterprise systems. Influences on enterprise software acquisition decision processes were found by an empirical study carried out from a practitioner's perspective. The study collected data via a mail survey administered to information systems (IS) professionals involved in the acquisition of enterprise software (ES). The survey questionnaire was developed based on a previous research project and a literature review. Organizational buying behavior (OBB) models in the literature served as the basis for the influences included in the survey instrument. Factor analysis was carried out on the survey data to identify the most significant factors/influences.

Findings

The following five factors emerged as significant influences on the acquisition decision process of enterprise software: ES strategy and performance; BPR and adaptability; management commitment and user buy‐in; single vendor integrated solution; and consultants, team‐location, and vendor's financing. These factors are discussed and managerial implications are extracted. Conclusions are derived from the study findings and guidelines for further research are suggested.

Research limitations/implications

The present study provides a starting point for further research in understanding a more comprehensive list of influences on enterprise software acquisition. A bigger sample from more industries is required to examine whether the significance of the influences remains stable.

Originality/value

Using OBB models has proven to be useful for organizations in making effective decisions on enterprise software acquisition.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Jacques Verville, Christine Bernadas and Alannah Halingten

This paper aims to present a discussion of the critical success factors (CSF) that affect the acquisition process for enterprise resource planning (ERP) software.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a discussion of the critical success factors (CSF) that affect the acquisition process for enterprise resource planning (ERP) software.

Design/methodology/approach

The research strategy was a multiple‐case design with three organizations that had recently completed the acquisition of an ERP solution. The rationale for the multiple‐case design was that, as a research strategy, the focus could be directed to understanding the dynamics and complexities present within each case, these being critical success factors of the ERP software acquisition process within the organization.

Findings

This study identified ten factors critical to the successful outcome of acquiring an ERP solution. Their omission would have resulted in a less than optimal outcome for the organization. For each of the three cases, the elements that stand out the most are as follows: clear and unambiguous authority, a structured, rigorous and user‐driven process, its planning, the establishment of criteria, and the sense of partnership that the team works to establish not only with various user commitments, but also with the potential vendor.

Originality/value

It is important to note that no one CSF alone is going to make an ERP acquisition successful. It is rather the combination of several critical factors that will result in its successful outcome.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Jacques Verville and Alannah Halingten

Decribes how ESC, a holding company for a gas and electric utility and non‐utility energy business, completed the acquisition of Oracle’s enterprise resource planning…

Abstract

Decribes how ESC, a holding company for a gas and electric utility and non‐utility energy business, completed the acquisition of Oracle’s enterprise resource planning (ERP) solution (finance and related applications) at a cost of US$6.5 million in March 1997. From initiation to completion, the acquisition took approximately six months. The structure of the acquisition process that emerged from the data revealed six distinctive iterative, recursive and inter‐related processes that, together, form a complex web of activity and tasks for the acquisition of ERP software. These activities and tasks are described and analyzed as a function of the six processes. The ERP acquisition process developed by ESC for this acquisition was non‐typical of their normal procurement practices and proved to be a significant learning experience for the entire organization. This case provides a useful illustration of “good practice” and sets forth the framework for the ERP acquisition process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Jacques Verville and Alannah Halingten

Keller Manufacturing, a mid‐sized furniture manufacturer, completed the purchase of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) software solution in August of 1996 at a cost of…

Abstract

Keller Manufacturing, a mid‐sized furniture manufacturer, completed the purchase of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) software solution in August of 1996 at a cost of US$1 million. From 12 individuals who participated on Keller’s acquisition team, the four principals were interviewed for this case. The structure of the acquisition process that emerged from the data revealed six distinctive iterative, recursive and inter‐related processes that, together, form a complex web of activity and tasks for the acquisition of ERP software. These activities and tasks are described and analyzed as a function of the six processes. The ERP acquisition process developed by Keller for this purchase was atypical of their normal purchasing practices and proved to be a significant learning experience for the entire organization. This case provides a useful illustration of “good practice” and sets forth the framework for the ERP acquisition process.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Jacques C. Verville and Alannah Halingten

This paper focuses on the influences and characteristics of the enterprise resource planning (ERP) acquisition process (ERPAP) that were found during a multiple‐case study…

Abstract

This paper focuses on the influences and characteristics of the enterprise resource planning (ERP) acquisition process (ERPAP) that were found during a multiple‐case study of four organizations that had acquired ERP solutions. From organizational buying behaviour (OBB), Webster and Wind’s (Prentice‐Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1972) served as the basis for categorizing the influences that surfaced during the study. While Webster and Wind’s model presents a broad scope of variables that might affect organizational buying without distinguishing those variables that are dependent on specific buying situations, the research herein highlights variables (influences and characteristics) specific to the buying situation for ERP software packages. Numerous influences emerged, among the most notable of which was the influence of users. Five prominent characteristics were also noted. A future study of these influences could examine the extent to which they impact the ERPAP and could serve to help organizations minimize those that are shown to hinder it.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Zahir Irani and Muhammad Kamal

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

F. Ian Stuart, Jacques Verville and Nazim Taskin

Despite the extensive body of research on the relationship between trust and performance in a supply chain environment, the concepts and the relationship between them has…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the extensive body of research on the relationship between trust and performance in a supply chain environment, the concepts and the relationship between them has not been fully understood. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model that links the antecedents of trust, trust itself and firm outcome success.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted to gather the data for this study. Statistical analysis included factor analysis with reliability and validity tests, and partial least square of structural equation modeling.

Findings

The data suggest that trust is built principally through supplier centric traditional performance metrics such as delivery reliability and product quality conformance. However, contrary to the extant literature, the people oriented trust enablers (e.g. personnel exchange, interpersonal contacts) have no bearing on the establishment of trust.

Research limitations/implications

The research limitation is the relatively small sample size. However, this study can be perceived as a directional one for further research.

Practical implications

The results can be used by the managers to improve their understanding on the relationship with other parties in the supply chain.

Originality/value

The significant value of this research can be retained by buying firm managers. The results are particularly important for them to improve their understanding in how they allocate time and resources in managing their supply chains and partner firms.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Len Tiu Wright

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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