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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Linda Logan, William B. Harley, Joan Pastor, Linda S. Wing, Naftaly Glasman, Lee Hanson, David Collins, Barbara A. Cleary, Jacqueline Miller and Paul Hegedahl

Each member of the Journal’s Editorial Advisory Board reviews the state of empowerment in today’s organizations.

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2561

Abstract

Each member of the Journal’s Editorial Advisory Board reviews the state of empowerment in today’s organizations.

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Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Jacqueline Miller

Addresses the value of laughter, play and a sense of humour as tools for improving communication, innovation and empowerment. Organizations around the world are hiring the…

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1267

Abstract

Addresses the value of laughter, play and a sense of humour as tools for improving communication, innovation and empowerment. Organizations around the world are hiring the author, and other facilitators, to deliver playful and humorous programmes designed to help team members develop a creative collaborative and customer‐centred culture. Lowering stress, improving interpersonal skills, increasing creativity and accelerating learning all can be accomplished by including fun in the workplace. These behaviours and skills support the empowered organization.

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Management Development Review, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Jacqueline Miller

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95

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Library Review, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Jacqueline Miller

Addresses the value of laughter, play and a sense of humor as tools for improving communication, innovation and empowerment. Organizations around the world are hiring the…

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1514

Abstract

Addresses the value of laughter, play and a sense of humor as tools for improving communication, innovation and empowerment. Organizations around the world are hiring the author, and other facilitators, to deliver playful and humorous programs designed to help team members develop a creative, collaborative and customer‐centered culture. Lowering stress, improving interpersonal skills, increasing creativity and accelerating learning all can be accomplished by including fun in the workplace. These behaviors and skills support the empowered organization.

Details

Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

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Content available

Abstract

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Jacqueline Dahan and Yvon Dufour

The main aim of this paper is to investigate the way middle managers picture their career success and the business strategy of their firm with the following key question…

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410

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this paper is to investigate the way middle managers picture their career success and the business strategy of their firm with the following key question in mind: “Is there a relationship between the two?”.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on a “polar sample” of two companies of the Canadian aerospace industry that use generic business strategies which differ considerably along the continuum of strategic approaches from one another. A list of 50 people was made in collaboration with the executives of the companies investigated. A total of 74 percent (37) of the middle managers invited to be interviewed accepted the invitation. The interviews lasted on average 90 minutes. They were analyzed using NVivo software.

Findings

The analysis yielded a set of four empirical configurations of career success. The idea of central orchestrating theme has been at the core of configuration theory since its inception but few researchers have set the task to investigate them let alone in studying career success. Four core unifying themes were found: “just watch me”, “one for all and all for one”, “eureka”, and “thanks but no thanks”. Each of the company strategies provides a receptive context for no more than two coexisting configurations of career success, one leading to a rapid ascent and the other to a slower one.

Originality/value

Few studies have looked into how middle managers portray career success for themselves. Furthermore, the literature is wanting in another crucial respect: the researchers do not take into consideration the particular strategic context of the firm. This paper argues that the paths toward career success must be understood in the context of the business strategy of the firms that give them form, meaning, and substance.

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Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Jacqueline Graves, Amunpreet Boyal, Tracey Shields, Roger Newham, Alistair Hewison and Louise Terry

This paper aims to report findings of a service evaluation using a human rights-based approach in the training and education of staff in palliative settings.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report findings of a service evaluation using a human rights-based approach in the training and education of staff in palliative settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A non-randomly sampled, uncontrolled, pre- and post-test design. Data was collected at three points over a six-month period during the period April 2017 to September 2019. As a service evaluation no ethical approval was required. Consent was implied by self-completion and submission of questionnaires. In total, 1,402 people attended the training, 480 completed pre- and post-training questionnaires (146 completed the questionnaire at six months), with 86 completing a questionnaire at all three data collection points.

Findings

Findings show increased levels of self-reported knowledge and confidence at two weeks and six months post-training. Implementing human rights in the workplace is complex. Difficulties maintaining knowledge and keeping up to date with changes in legislation and traditional ways of working were cited as barriers to service users’ human rights.

Research limitations/implications

More evaluation is required to ensure the positive elements in this evaluation can be applied more widely.

Practical implications

Human rights education has a contribution to make in supporting staff to manage the challenges involved. It may also increase the complexity of decision-making. Training needs to incorporate systems wide approaches and its benefits measured.

Social implications

The aim was to provide staff with the knowledge to make objective and proportionate decisions about personalised care. The assumption was this would help improve the experience of end of life care.

Originality/value

This is the first evaluation in the UK that we are aware of that has examined the impact of human rights education on end of life care.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2019

Jacqueline Stephenson and Natalie Persadie

The purpose of this paper is to examine employment discrimination in the English-speaking Caribbean by analysing evidence from jurisdictions where anti-discrimination…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine employment discrimination in the English-speaking Caribbean by analysing evidence from jurisdictions where anti-discrimination legislation has been enacted (namely Guyana, St Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago (T&T)).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews existing anti-discrimination legislation in the three named countries, along with available court and tribunal decisions, with a view of determining whether the protections reasonably cover all minority groups.

Findings

It has been shown that, despite the existence of anti-discrimination law in T&T, St Lucia and Guyana, discrimination is still reported. T&T is the only jurisdiction with a functioning Equality Opportunity Commission and Tribunal, and where a wide range of cases has been adjudicated, relative to St Lucia and Guyana.

Research limitations/implications

Legislators and policy makers may wish to consider the findings of this research in making legislative amendments or enacting new laws, with a view to broadening the range of protections. Organisational practitioners may use the findings to assist them with interpreting the law (and their responsibilities to protected groups) and its intended impact on HR practice and, where necessary, make changes where current practices are incongruent with the legislation.

Practical implications

Legislators and policy makers may consider the findings of this research in making legislative amendments, with a view to broadening the range of protections. Organisational practitioners may use the findings to assist them with interpreting and implementing the law.

Originality/value

This paper reviews current Caribbean anti-discrimination legislation and cases, which to date has not been done. It highlights the omission of sexual orientation from legislation enacted across the region. There is currently a paucity of research on employment discrimination within Caribbean territories and specifically as it relates to the effect of applicable legislation. Consequently, this paper establishes a benchmark for future researchers and it informs organisational and societal stakeholders as to what may constitute prohibited practices.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2019

Alys Longley and Barbara Kensington-Miller

Many graduate attributes (such as adaptability, resilience, cultural awareness and professionalism) are often considered aspirational or invisible and conventionally go…

Abstract

Purpose

Many graduate attributes (such as adaptability, resilience, cultural awareness and professionalism) are often considered aspirational or invisible and conventionally go “under the radar” of standard university dance education. The purpose of this paper is to add to existing theories of dance as an academic discipline and contributes to studies identifying and mapping graduate attributes across the academy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research project Making the Invisible Visible contextualises this paper. It has involved a two-year, cyclical data-gathering process, involving interviews with leading dance employers and academics, and surveys of students from diverse disciplines entering and completing full-time dance degrees.

Findings

Due to the centrality of embodiment in studio learning, dance is an unusual discipline within research on graduate attributes and holds a unique place in academia. The creative, embodied, collaborative activities typical to dance learning offer fresh insight to the literature on graduate attributes – both visible and invisible – all graduates from a given institution are expected to hold.

Originality/value

A narrative methodology is employed to present a series of amalgam characters manifesting specific ways in which invisible graduate attributes inform pedagogies, student–teacher relationships and student understandings of their professional skills.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Jacqueline L. Birt, Kala Muthusamy and Poonam Bir

eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL) is an internet-based interactive form of reporting language that is expected to enhance the usefulness of financial reporting…

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2685

Abstract

Purpose

eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL) is an internet-based interactive form of reporting language that is expected to enhance the usefulness of financial reporting (Yuan and Wang, 2009). In the UK and the USA, XBRL is mandatory, and in Australia, it is voluntarily adopted. It has been reported that in the not too distant future, XBRL will be the standard format for the preparation and exchange of business reports (Gettler, 2015). Using an experimental approach, this study assesses the usefulness of financial reports with XBRL tagged information compared to PDF format information for non-professional investors. The authors investigate participants’ perceptions of usefulness in relation to the qualitative characteristics of relevance, understandability and comparability.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an experimental approach featuring a profit-forecasting task to determine if participants perceive XBRL-tagged information to be more useful compared to PDF-formatted information.

Findings

Results reveal that financial information presented with XBRL tagging is significantly more relevant, understandable and comparable to non-professional investors.

Originality/value

The authors address a gap in the literature by examining XBRL usefulness in Australia where XBRL adoption will be mandated within the not too distant future. Currently, the voluntary adoption of XBRL by preparers and users is low, possibly, because of a lack of awareness about XBRL and its potential benefits. This study yields significant implications for the accounting regulators in creating more awareness on the benefits of using XBRL and to create an impetus for XBRL adoption.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 30 no. 01
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

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