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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Jacqueline Harding

This paper aims to investigate how, where and when parents are mediating their children’s media activities and with which particular device. It also explores whether…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how, where and when parents are mediating their children’s media activities and with which particular device. It also explores whether parents are identifying specific help in this area and questions where they might seek advice (should they need it). Furthermore, it investigates parents’ views regarding a pilot, free online TV channel dedicated to advice through discussion with experts, parents and children.

Design/methodology/approach

This small-scale study uses charts and semi-structured interviews to explore the views of parents/carers to better understand lived experiences in relation to mediated digital parenting in the home. The methodology was also designed so that findings will inform further production of relevant content for a video-based resource.

Findings

Although this study was limited in duration and scope, the results clearly support earlier research (Livingstone, 2018a, 2018b; Ofcom, 2017) regarding the desperation parents feel through not being able to access appropriate advice in the way they want it. Furthermore, findings provide overwhelming support for the potential benefits of relevant predominantly visually-based online content/advice.

Practical implications

The study raises questions about the empowerment of parents/carers in their own digital skills as a way of transferring confidence to their children, in navigating their way through the educational and social affordances and online safety issues through the use of accessible filmed content.

Originality/value

The findings show that issues, such as online safety and related behavioural pressures, remain key for parents and that there is an increasing need for more targeted support and ways to empower parents/grandparents with skills to enhance children’s digital agency. Furthermore, it offers an insight into ways in which styles of “enabling mediation” in the digital age may be analysed and reveals some of the day to day challenges parents face.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Jacqueline Harding, Judit Szakacs and Becky Parry

This paper aims to examine what elements in online environments promote engagement, learning and repeated visits for children aged 6‐12 years.

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1478

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine what elements in online environments promote engagement, learning and repeated visits for children aged 6‐12 years.

Design/methodology/approach

An in‐depth textual analysis, exploring components such as navigation, construction of site, character choice and development, style of text, types of questioning, animation, color and other factors, of six English‐language web sites, describing themselves as “educational and fun”, was carried out against a background of literature available on web site design for children, relying particularly on media text analysis and an evaluation method produced in relation to children's motivation and web site use.

Findings

The analysis of the six web sites resulted in a number of usability requirements for children's web sites, including the following: web sites should have an understanding of the community of users they serve; web sites should offer dynamic forms of learning; web sites should encourage interaction between users and site designers; web sites should offer open activities rather than closed ones; web sites should view young people as persons with rights.

Research limitations/implications

Insights gained from the analysis of six web sites are hard to generalize. User behavior was not studied.

Practical implications

Web designers should bear the usability requirements in mind when designing web sites for children.

Originality/value

Although educational content for children on the internet is growing exponentially, the area is relatively under‐researched. This is one of the first detailed analyses of entertaining educational web sites targeting children.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2004

Jacqueline Harding

Explains the educational value of character‐led preschool magazines within the context of child development; the study by Browne shows that they are of more than purely…

Abstract

Explains the educational value of character‐led preschool magazines within the context of child development; the study by Browne shows that they are of more than purely leisure value. Defines media literacy, and distinguishes the world of children’s popular culture from that of adults. Shows how magazines function as an educational tool because of their interactive format, familiar characters from television, and non‐challenging nature, which however allows children to develop puzzle‐solving skills as well as reading skills. Outlines in a table the developmental stages of children from two to five years in terms of general and physical development, linguistic and symbolic development, cognitive development, and emotional and social development.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Dr Brian Young

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337

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Kunden Patel, Laura Roche, Nicola Coward, Jacqueline Meek and Celia Harding

The purpose of this paper is to present an evaluation of a programme of training and support provided to staff, which aimed to encourage supported communication…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an evaluation of a programme of training and support provided to staff, which aimed to encourage supported communication environments for people with learning disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Training, monitoring and support for communication, specifically augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies, was provided by speech and language therapy staff to two residential services over 46 weeks. Staff and service user communications were observed pre- and post-intervention.

Findings

In one provision there was an increase in service user initiations and the use of some AAC strategies by support staff. In the other provision there was no change in service user initiations and a decrease in the range of AAC strategies used. It appears that some forms for AAC remain challenging for staff to implement.

Originality/value

This evaluation explores ways of using specialist support services to improve communication environments for people with learning difficulties. Possible reasons for differences in the outcome of the intervention are discussed. Future research into the types of communication interactions experienced by people with learning disabilities across the range of communication styles may be useful so that support staff can be better helped to provide sustained and enriched communication environments.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Jackie Ford and Nancy Harding

This paper tracks how a policy recommended by management consultants becomes embedded as an integral part of leadership practice. It explores the launch of the concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper tracks how a policy recommended by management consultants becomes embedded as an integral part of leadership practice. It explores the launch of the concept of “talent management” by McKinsey & Company and how it becomes adopted as part of expected leadership practices in the English National Health Service. The use of Management Consultants globally has increased exponentially, and the paper considers this phenomenon and the ways in which management consultant advice influences public sector leadership and practice at local level.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is adopted, focussing on the introduction of the concept of talent management into the English NHS, following the wider emergence of the concept through influential reports published by McKinsey & Company in the late 1990s. An analysis of the emergence of the concept is conducted drawing on this series of reports and the adoption of talent management policies and practices by the English government's Department of Health.

Findings

These influential reports by the management consultancy firm, McKinsey & Company, constituted an urgent need for this newly identified concept of talent management and the secrecy surrounding its reception. It is this mystery surrounding the decisions about a talent management strategy in the NHS and the concealment of decisions behind closed doors, which leads us to offer a theory of management consultants' influence on leaders as one of performative seduction.

Originality/value

Management consultancy is a vast business whose influence reaches deeply into public and private sector organisations around the world. Understanding of the variegated policies and practices that constitute contemporary modes of governance therefore requires comprehension of management consultants' role within those policies and practices. This paper argues that management consultants influence public sector leadership through insertion of their products into definitions of, and performative constitution of, local level leadership.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Katie Beavan

This chapter takes the form of an open feminist letter, a complaint and a manifesto presented to the Critical Management Studies (CMS) Academy. It is posted with urgency…

Abstract

This chapter takes the form of an open feminist letter, a complaint and a manifesto presented to the Critical Management Studies (CMS) Academy. It is posted with urgency at a time when Patriarchy is resurging across the globe. My complaint is against the misogyny and the moral injury done to all of us and to our participants through our detached, disembodied, non-relation, pseudo-objective, masculine ways of becoming and being CMS scholars. Drawing on the thinking of Hélène Cixous, I offer five gifts as strategies to break with the masculine reckoning and open up our scholarship to féminine multiplicity and generativity: loving not knowing, return to our material bodies, rightsizing theory, knowledge made flesh-to-flesh and women’s writing. I visit, and suggest our scholarship will benefit from visiting, Cixous’s School of the Dead and her School of Dreams. I advocate for social theatre/performative auto/ethnography as a way to effect change in organisations. Finally, I present a manifesto for women’s writing that can help take our scholarship ‘home’ and contribute to the creation of flourishing organisations. This letter is a Call to Arms.

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Abstract

Details

The Romance of Heroism and Heroic Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-655-2

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Book part
Publication date: 6 February 2019

George R. Goethals and Scott T. Allison

Abstract

Details

The Romance of Heroism and Heroic Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-655-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2015

Ryan Felty, Brian G. Whitaker, Shawn M. Bergman and Jacqueline Z. Bergman

The current study integrates self-enhancement and social exchange theories to construct hypotheses in which team-level narcissism is expected to negatively influence…

Abstract

The current study integrates self-enhancement and social exchange theories to construct hypotheses in which team-level narcissism is expected to negatively influence team-level task performance ratings and team-level organizational citizenship behaviors directed at team members (OCB-Is). Additionally, individual-level narcissism is expected to negatively influence peer performance ratings. Based on longitudinal data collected from 89 study participants constituting 29 project teams, results indicate (a) team-level narcissism influences task performance, (b) team-level narcissism influences changes in OCB-Is over time, and (c) individual-level narcissism influences peer performance ratings. Our findings suggest the necessity for practitioners to consider individual differences in the strategic formation of work groups.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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