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Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Jacqueline Goodman

This paper investigates why mothers are losing to fathers in contested child custody battles that have occurred between 1980 and 2003. It employs quantitative…

Abstract

This paper investigates why mothers are losing to fathers in contested child custody battles that have occurred between 1980 and 2003. It employs quantitative, qualitative, and contextual strategies to understand the complex set of forces involved. The findings suggest that single mothers and children are increasingly trapped in a war zone between cost conscious policymakers ideologically opposed to the welfare state, angry fathers shouldering the burden of a shift from public to private transfers of funding in the form of child support, religious zealots intent on turning back the clock to a mythical patriarchal Eden, and the legal doctrine of gender neutrality reflecting these political forces.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-262-7

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Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Abstract

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Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-262-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Abstract

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-262-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Jacqueline Miller

Addresses the value of laughter, play and a sense of humour as tools for improving communication, innovation and empowerment. Organizations around the world are hiring the…

Abstract

Addresses the value of laughter, play and a sense of humour as tools for improving communication, innovation and empowerment. Organizations around the world are hiring the author, and other facilitators, to deliver playful and humorous programmes designed to help team members develop a creative collaborative and customer‐centred culture. Lowering stress, improving interpersonal skills, increasing creativity and accelerating learning all can be accomplished by including fun in the workplace. These behaviours and skills support the empowered organization.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Hanneke Du Preez and Jacqueline Stoman

The purpose of this study is to determine whether the factors once identified through literature and compared to the current situation in South Africa could predict the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine whether the factors once identified through literature and compared to the current situation in South Africa could predict the possibility of a tax revolt in South Africa. South Africans are experiencing frequent increases in taxes on already overburdened taxpayers, corruption, a lack of service delivery by the government and high unemployment rates. South Africa has seen an increased amount of protests relating to taxes, corruption and a lack of basic services.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 12,000 Twitter feeds were collected from 14 February 2017 to 1 March 2017, the period before, during and after the South African National Budget Speech on 22 February 2017. The feeds were analysed using a thematic analysis. The emerging themes were identified as factors present in South Africa that may predict a possible tax revolt.

Findings

The factors found to be present in South Africa are: F1-failure of government to address the imminent collapse, F2-significant number of people with substantial debt, F3-onerous tax systems, including many different types of taxes, F4-high number of unemployed people, F5-education frustration, F6-increase in tax rates on citizens already overburdened by current taxes, F7-poor quality of governors, and performance of the country’s leaders and administration, including fraud and F8-wastefulness.

Originality/value

The value of the study is, first to contribute to the existing academic literature examining the factors that are likely to indicate a tax revolts. Second, the study uses an innovative data source, namely, tweets, to examine the climate for a possible tax revolt in South Africa.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2007

David Shinar

Abstract

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Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Jacqueline Granleese

A total of 220 managers from a banking organisation were surveyed. No differences for age, educational background, employment history or managerial level were found, but…

Abstract

A total of 220 managers from a banking organisation were surveyed. No differences for age, educational background, employment history or managerial level were found, but females were significantly more likely than males to be the first person of their sex to hold their particular managerial position. Women are significantly less likely to be married or to have children. They have significantly fewer children, and their children tend to be significantly younger than those of their male colleagues. Women still have to make choices that men do not in order to further their careers. Average scores for occupational pressures were not high for either sex. Men report higher levels of pressure stemming from the work environment and managerial relationships with subordinates and superiors. Women report significantly higher pressures stemming from perceived gender inequities and work‐life balance concerns. Discussion focuses on why women bank managers do not perceive the workplace as free of gender‐related and work‐life balance pressures.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Jacqueline Burgess and Christian Jones

The purpose of this study is to investigate members’ reactions to the forced closure of a narrative video game brand community and its participatory culture.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate members’ reactions to the forced closure of a narrative video game brand community and its participatory culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The BioWare Social Network forums closure was announced in a thread, which attracted 8,891 posts. These were analysed using thematic analysis, facilitated by the software program Leximancer and non-participatory netnography.

Findings

The brand community and participatory culture members were predominantly distressed because they would lose their relationships with each other and access to the participatory culture’s creative output.

Research limitations/implications

Previous research suggested that video game players cannot be fans and that player-generated content is exploitative. However, members, self-identified as fans, encouraged BioWare’s use of their player-created content for financial gain and articulated the community’s marketing benefits, all of which have implications for Fan and Game Studies’ researchers. Research using primary data could identify brand communities and participatory cultures’ specific benefits and their members’ attitudes about brands’ commercial use of their outputs. Further research is required to identify other products and brands not suitable for establishing brand communities on social media to determine the best ways to manage them.

Practical implications

Addressing narrative brand communities’ complaints quickly can prevent negative financial outcomes and using social media sites for brand communities may not be suitable structurally or because of members’ privacy concerns. Furthermore, consumers often have intense emotional bonds with narrative brands, their communities and participatory cultures, which marketers may underestimate or misunderstand.

Originality/value

This study of the unique phenomenon of the forced closure of a narrative brand community and its participatory culture increased understandings about them.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Jacqueline Miller

Addresses the value of laughter, play and a sense of humor as tools for improving communication, innovation and empowerment. Organizations around the world are hiring the…

Abstract

Addresses the value of laughter, play and a sense of humor as tools for improving communication, innovation and empowerment. Organizations around the world are hiring the author, and other facilitators, to deliver playful and humorous programs designed to help team members develop a creative, collaborative and customer‐centered culture. Lowering stress, improving interpersonal skills, increasing creativity and accelerating learning all can be accomplished by including fun in the workplace. These behaviors and skills support the empowered organization.

Details

Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Jacqueline S. Scerbinski

Environmental concerns are shaping development and marketing of a host of products. Astute firms are now targeting products to this growing segment of consumers.

Abstract

Environmental concerns are shaping development and marketing of a host of products. Astute firms are now targeting products to this growing segment of consumers.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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