Search results

1 – 10 of 23
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2018

Jacqueline Cumming, Phoebe Dunn, Lesley Middleton and Claire O’Loughlin

The purpose of this paper is to report on the origins, development and early impacts of a Health Care Home (HCH) model of care being rolled out around New Zealand (NZ).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the origins, development and early impacts of a Health Care Home (HCH) model of care being rolled out around New Zealand (NZ).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on a literature review on HCHs and related developments in primary health care, background discussions with key players, and a review of significant HCH implementation documents.

Findings

The HCH model of care is emerging from the sector itself and is being tailored to local needs and to meet the needs of local practices. A key focus in NZ seems to be on business efficiency and ensuring sustainability of general practice – with the assumption that freeing up general practitioner time for complex patients will mean better care for those populations. HCH models of care differ around the world and NZ needs its own evidence to show the model’s effectiveness in achieving its goals.

Research limitations/implications

It is still early days for the HCH model of care in NZ and the findings in this paper are based on limited evidence. Further evidence is needed to identify the model’s full impact over the next few years.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to explore the HCH model of care in NZ.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Jeffrey Braithwaite, Kristiana Ludlow, Kate Churruca, Wendy James, Jessica Herkes, Elise McPherson, Louise A. Ellis and Janet C. Long

Much work about health reform and systems improvement in healthcare looks at shortcomings and universal problems facing health systems, but rarely are accomplishments…

Abstract

Purpose

Much work about health reform and systems improvement in healthcare looks at shortcomings and universal problems facing health systems, but rarely are accomplishments dissected and analyzed internationally. The purpose of this paper is to address this knowledge gap by examining the lessons learned from health system reform and improvement efforts in 60 countries.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 60 low-, middle- and high-income countries provided a case study of successful health reform, which was gathered into a compendium as a recently published book. Here, the extensive source material was re-examined through inductive content analysis to derive broad themes of systems change internationally.

Findings

Nine themes were identified: improving policy, coverage and governance; enhancing the quality of care; keeping patients safe; regulating standards and accreditation; organizing care at the macro-level; organizing care at the meso- and micro-level; developing workforces and resources; harnessing technology and IT; and making collaboratives and partnerships work.

Practical implications

These themes provide a model of what constitutes successful systems change across a wide sample of health systems, offering a store of knowledge about how reformers and improvement initiators achieve their goals.

Originality/value

Few comparative international studies of health systems include a sufficiently wide selection of low-, middle- and high-income countries in their analysis. This paper provides a more balanced approach to consider where achievements are being made across healthcare, and what we can do to replicate and spread successful examples of systems change internationally.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2022

Jacqueline Ann Surin

There is currently no case study for how clean language interviewing (CLI) might be useful for journalists. This chapter addresses that gap by discussing the value of CLI…

Abstract

Chapter Summary

There is currently no case study for how clean language interviewing (CLI) might be useful for journalists. This chapter addresses that gap by discussing the value of CLI in journalistic interviews within the scope of a profile story interview. A profile story is akin to a mini biography, usually of a public figure or an interesting personality. This chapter was written drawing on my experience as an award-winning journalist in Malaysia for 20 years.

The chapter first examines the experience of CLI for both the interviewee and the interviewer. It then considers how the experience is similar to or different from other ‘standard’ media interviews both have been involved in. The chapter concludes that CLI is a method of interviewing that exceeds the criteria for what constitutes a good journalistic interview, within the context of a profile interview.

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Yukiko Takeuchi and Rajib Shaw

Japan is an island arc that sits in the monsoon region, and is under the influence of warm and moist air masses in summer and cool air masses in winter. The moisture that…

Abstract

Japan is an island arc that sits in the monsoon region, and is under the influence of warm and moist air masses in summer and cool air masses in winter. The moisture that is taken in the lower leaves of the air masses over the sea is poured on the country by typhoons in summer, by snowfall in winter, by the “Bai-u Front” (in Japanese) in June and July, and by depressions and fronts in all seasons. Owing to Japan's slender shape and complicated landform, aerial differences in climate are great. Japan is located on the eastern edge of the monsoonal region of Asia, and its climate varies according to seasonal and regional conditions. Typically, heavy rains occur in various parts of the country, both during the rainy season in June and July and during the typhoon season from August to October. This precipitation is predominantly in the form of locally specific temporary downpours. In winter, the northern part of the country usually receives heavy snowfall that causes prolonged floods in spring from the melting of snow. The average amount of precipitation is 1,800mm (70 inches) a year. This is two or three times the amount received in other areas of the same latitude. In the southern Pacific coast areas, rainfall amounts to 4,000mm (160 inches). Precipitation in Tokyo is twice as much as other large cities in western countries. Some 50–60% of the annual precipitation in the Pacific coast of Japan is concentrated from June to October. Artificial changes in natural environments are rapid and large, accompanying the great increase in economic activity and exploitation (Nakano, Kadomura, Mizutani, Okuda, & Sekiguchi, 1974). Although the country's 10% of land area is flood prone, about 50% of the population lives in floodplains and almost 75% of the property is concentrated in the floodplains (JWF, 2006).

Details

Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: An Asian Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-485-7

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Rekha Nianthi

Throughout the world, at one period or another in its history, it has been the practice to cultivate tree species and agricultural crops in intimate combination in most of…

Abstract

Throughout the world, at one period or another in its history, it has been the practice to cultivate tree species and agricultural crops in intimate combination in most of the countries. The history of cultivating trees and crops in home gardens, social tree planting, protecting and managing forests, appreciating wildlife, and sustaining the beauties of nature in Sri Lanka go back to more than about 25 centuries. In chronicles, there are some references on social tree planting practices, and home gardens planted with flowering and fruit-bearing trees in Sri Lanka. Because of the traditions, influencing factors of the existing environment, and nature of agroforestry, the numerous examples of agroforestry practices are found in all agro climatic and ecological zones of Sri Lanka. Today, the traditional knowledge of agroforestry is being developed and expanded with the objective of improving living standards, especially the rural communities in Sri Lanka.

Details

Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: An Asian Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-485-7

Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Jacqueline Briggs

This chapter provides a genealogy of the Gladue–Ipeelee principle of special consideration of Indigenous circumstances at sentencing. The principle is codified in the 1996…

Abstract

This chapter provides a genealogy of the Gladue–Ipeelee principle of special consideration of Indigenous circumstances at sentencing. The principle is codified in the 1996 statutory requirement that “all available sanctions other than imprisonment … should be considered for all offenders, with particular attention to the circumstances of Aboriginal offenders” (s. 718.2e of the Criminal Code of Canada). Using the Foucaultian genealogy method to produce a “history of the present,” this chapter eschews normative questions of how s. 718.2e has “failed” to reduce Indigenous over-incarceration to instead focus on how practices of “special consideration” reproduce settler-state paternalism. This chapter addresses three key components of the Gladue–Ipeelee principle: the collection of circumstances information, the characterization of those circumstances, and finally their consideration at sentencing. Part one focuses on questions of legitimacy and authority and explicates how authority and responsibility to produce Indigenous circumstances knowledge was transferred from the Department of Indian Affairs (DIA) to Indigenous Courtworker organizations in the late 1960s/early 1970s. Part two identifies how authority shapes problematization by examining the characterization of Indigenous circumstances in the two eras, finding that present-day Gladue reports articulate an Indigenous history and critique of colonialism as the root cause of Indigenous criminalization, whereas DIA reports prior to 1970 generally characterized this criminalization as a “failure to assimilate.” Part three focuses on the structural reproduction of power relations by exploring historical continuities in judicial and executive-branch consideration of Indigenous circumstances, suggesting that the Gladue–Ipeelee principle reinscribes a colonial “mercy” framework of diminished responsibility. The author discusses how the principle operates in the shadow of Indigenous over-incarceration as a form of state “recognition” and a technique of governance to encourage Indigenous participation in the settler justice system and suggests that the Gladue–Ipeelee principle produces a governing effect that reinforces settler-state authority by recirculating colonial practices and discourses of settler superiority.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-297-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2022

Paul Tosey, Heather Cairns-Lee and James Lawley

In this book the terms ‘clean language’ and ‘clean language interviewing’ are written using lower case, according to the convention of the American Psychological…

Abstract

NB

In this book the terms ‘clean language’ and ‘clean language interviewing’ are written using lower case, according to the convention of the American Psychological Association (sixth edition). ‘Clean language interviewing’ is sometimes abbreviated to CLI.

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2022

Jacqueline Francis-Coad, Tessa Watts, Caroline Bulsara and Anne-Marie Hill

The purpose of this study was to co-design a falls prevention education programme with aged care home residents and staff and evaluate its feasibility. The intention of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to co-design a falls prevention education programme with aged care home residents and staff and evaluate its feasibility. The intention of providing the education programme was to assist residents to stay safe and mobile whilst reducing their risk of falling.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-phase mixed methods participatory design using a resident (n = 6) and care staff (n = 5) consumer engagement panel, pre- and post-programme resident (n = 35) survey and semi-structured care staff interviews (n = 8) was undertaken in two countries.

Findings

A poster, brochure, video and staff education guide featuring 12 safety messages depicting fall prevention behaviours were co-designed. Residents, supported by staff, perceived the falls prevention education programme as enjoyable and informative, but there were no significant differences in capability, opportunity or motivation. However, several residents were observed enacting fall prevention behaviours such as “If I feel unwell, I'll ring the bell” and waiting for staff assistance. Challenges to programme demand, acceptability and implementation which may have impacted residents' exposure and engagement with the programme were identified, along with recommendations to improve feasibility.

Practical implications

When developing falls prevention education programmes partnering with residents and staff, providing choices to meet personal and aesthetic preferences along with frequent, shorter duration learning opportunities are important for translating education messages into actions.

Originality/value

The use of bespoke resources, novel rhymes, positive messages emphasising safety and co-designing with residents themselves was a welcomed point of programme difference.

Details

Health Education, vol. 122 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

1 – 10 of 23