Search results

1 – 6 of 6
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2019

Jacqueline Botterill

George Mortimer Pullman (1831-1897), nineteenth century US luxury rail car entrepreneur, divides opinion. Some commemorate Pullman as a brilliant industrialist, innovator and…

Abstract

Purpose

George Mortimer Pullman (1831-1897), nineteenth century US luxury rail car entrepreneur, divides opinion. Some commemorate Pullman as a brilliant industrialist, innovator and self-made man. Others view him as a loathsome robber baron, union buster, racist and affront to democracy. This paper aims to demonstrate Pullman’s significant contribution to marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical accounts of Pullman are re-examined to highlight his company’s unique adaptation of numerous marketing techniques (consumer research, brand strategy, public relations, product launch, fashion cycle, advertising, product placement and customer service marketing).

Findings

Pullman’s distinct flair for understanding his market enabled him to develop marketing strategies intertwined with broader cultural changes in ideals and practices. Pullman’s construction of destination tourism met an expanding white middle class desire for recreation and escape from the economic and racial inequality of the city. Pullman’s creed that beauty acted as a civilizing agent spoke to the social norms of leisure class femininity. Constant release of ever-grander rail cars shaped a fashion cycle around which wealthy men’s status competition turned. Pullman pioneered the leasing of luxury to control his best asset: the service of black Porters’.

Originality/value

First, this paper provides a new perspective on George Pullman, a significant figure in US history. Second, it addresses a common bias in nineteenth century historical accounts that privilege the contribution of men, industrial labor and production and shadow the role of consumption, women and leisure. Third, it challenges the idea of a clean divide between industrial and post-industrial economies by tracing contemporary consumer culture practices to their nineteenth century roots (marketing, destination tourism, brand stories, democratization of fashion, tipping and service with a smile).

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Jacqueline Botterill and Stephen Kline

This paper seeks to report historical research into McDonald's public communication strategies as the corporation responded to the rising tide of “political consumerism” that…

5463

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report historical research into McDonald's public communication strategies as the corporation responded to the rising tide of “political consumerism” that accompanied its global market expansion (1960‐2005).

Design/methodology/approach

Reviewing the brand's public relations strategies, through a content analysis of news coverage, the paper analyzes the way communication strategists took account of the anxieties about youth labour practices, community relations, globalization, environment and obesity which forced the brand to acknowledge the lifestyle risks associated with children and youth.

Findings

The case study portrays McDonald's as a figurehead of US entrepreneurial multinational capitalism. It reveals how addressing public opposition through the courts can backfire on a brand strategy so keen on defending its honour. The case study also finds that listening and engaging with critics is as effective as suing them for McDonald's.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the historical recognition of the role that corporate communications professionals play – particularly marketing and public relations specialists – in transforming corporate practices by acknowledging consumers' growing anxieties about industrialization.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Valérie-Inés de La Ville

The case of corporations establishing a relationship with young people – because of the moral responsibility involved – allows us to illustrate the complexities of trying to…

1117

Abstract

Purpose

The case of corporations establishing a relationship with young people – because of the moral responsibility involved – allows us to illustrate the complexities of trying to decide what is morally correct to collectively ensure children's well-being. This paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying the “stakeholder theory” to child industries – under which term this paper includes all business activities that establish a commercial relationship involving children, either as the recipient or user of the final product or beneficiary of a specific service, or as a co-decision-maker for purchases within his/her family or social circles – reveals a series of conceptual challenges...

Findings

The limited understanding of stakeholder theory within the CSR managerial perspective leads companies to overlook some important moral issues about children's well-being, and exposes them to particularly hard criticisms of their actions and marketing policies.

Research limitations/implications

If children have been overlooked by the stakeholder theory, how may the interests of youth be represented in a stakeholder perspective?

Practical implications

To deal with some of the dilemmas entailed by considering children's representatives as legitimate spokespersons, the paper suggests drawing on the ethics of care to attempt delineating a corporate social responsibility towards young people.

Originality/value

This paper emphasises a number of issues relevant to young consumers, including the absence of children in stakeholder theory and how that absence speaks to the presumed extent and boundaries of corporate social responsibility.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Valérie‐Inés de La Ville

This paper seeks to conceptualize the field of child and teen consumption as a system of social practices at the cross roads of six strongly intermingled subsystems covering…

1096

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to conceptualize the field of child and teen consumption as a system of social practices at the cross roads of six strongly intermingled subsystems covering social, institutional, technological, narrative, economic, and political stakes. Children's and teens' consumption is shaped and transformed by a mix of managerial action, public policy, cycles of technological change, the evolution of related institutions like parenthood and schooling, changing cultural references, values, modes of socialization as well as by the actions of children and teens themselves.

Design/methodology/approach

Within such a framework, child and teen consumption appears as a complex arena of competing moral and ideological perspectives. In such a volatile context, forms of resistance to ideologies of unending consumption emerge, continuously calling into question the responsibility of business for unwanted long‐term effects.

Findings

The five papers included in this special issue shed light on the complexities of marketing to children by successively exploring the contradictions within the individual, managerial, professional, corporate, and institutional levels. As a direct consequence, the notions of “corporate social responsibility” and “corporate social responsiveness” towards childhood are also constantly evolving concepts which are quite difficult to grasp.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to design a transformative research agenda to promote socially responsible marketing practices and ethically embedded theoretical frameworks. It also stands as an invitation to deepen the indispensable dialogue – albeit often demanding for both sides – between marketing practitioners and social scientists aimed at constantly redefining the moving outline of corporate social responsibility in contemporary children‐oriented markets.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

6065

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The story of McDonald's has become almost legendary, from a small, family‐owned restaurant to a multi‐billion dollar global giant with more than 30,000 restaurants. Between incorporation and the millennium, McDonald's saw profits increase in every consecutive quarter. McDonald's currently accounts for 43 per cent of total US burger sales, and earns four times that of its nearest competitor. To become such a player in global business, the marketing and PR departments must have been doing a great job, surely? Well, maybe not. McDonald's have had their ups and downs in the public eye, yet each time seems to escape unscathed. This article details exactly how McDonald's have responded during four notable PR crises.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

James Bishop, Dino Bouchlaghem, Jacqueline Glass and Isao Matsumoto

The purpose of this paper is to identify a set of critical success factors, which ensure the effectiveness of knowledge management initiatives, with particular focus on the effect

5065

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify a set of critical success factors, which ensure the effectiveness of knowledge management initiatives, with particular focus on the effect of people‐oriented success factors.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive review of knowledge management literature, substantiated by ten qualitative interviews with leading academics and industrial representatives in the field of knowledge management in the construction industry.

Findings

The research suggests that organisations need to consider several key areas, in particular, the processes and practices undertaken to understand and define knowledge management, the implementation of dedicated champions, the integration of the initiative into the business, and effective communication of its benefits to members of staff. Each of these factors will have a direct bearing on the level of effectiveness reached by an organisation's knowledge management initiative.

Research limitations/implications

The industry‐based interviewees were all strategic‐level managers. This means that, in relation to the application of knowledge management initiatives, they adopt primarily managerial roles. Further interviews with the practitioners of these initiatives would be beneficial in reflecting the more “hands‐on” perspective of knowledge management implementation.

Originality/value

A holistic overview of the best‐practice for maximising the effectiveness of a knowledge management initiative by addressing the issues, which concern the people involved with its implementation.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6