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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2003

Jacqueline Blackmore and Alex Douglas

This paper examines the use of the EFQM Model in H.E. Institutions in the UK and offers a case study of how one University used the Excellence Model as a means to change…

Abstract

This paper examines the use of the EFQM Model in H.E. Institutions in the UK and offers a case study of how one University used the Excellence Model as a means to change the way it operated. It identifies and disucsses the critical success factors for a university utilising the Model, in particular Leadership (criteria 1), People Management, particularly with regard to performance evaluation (criteria 3), having key processes in place (criteria 5) and the identification of the correct key performance results for its various stakeholders (criteria 9).

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Jacqueline Ann Blackmore

This account of internal audit is set within the context of higher education in the UK and a fictitiously named Riverbank University. The study evaluates the recent…

Abstract

This account of internal audit is set within the context of higher education in the UK and a fictitiously named Riverbank University. The study evaluates the recent introduction of “Internal Academic Audit” to the University and compares the process with that of the internationally recognised ISO 19011 Guidelines for Auditing Quality Management Systems, used both in the private and public sectors. A thorough review of the literature on audit theory was conducted in order to gauge best and worst practices. The aim was to identify any theory‐practice gaps between the British Standard guidelines and actual internal academic audit performance, as well as any possible reasons for them. Finally, it is suggested that when compared with the British Standard's model the internal academic audit process is somewhat less robust, particularly in terms of auditor selection and training.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Jacqueline A. Blackmore

To provide a best practice framework for peer review via teaching observation as a method of appraising teaching performance within UK higher education (HE) institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a best practice framework for peer review via teaching observation as a method of appraising teaching performance within UK higher education (HE) institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses secondary data analysis via the current literature on peer review and peer appraisal, as well as use of primary data obtained via the design, implementation and analysis of semi‐structured interviews with management and teaching staff within the Faculty of Business and Management Science within a fictitiously named Riverbank University.

Findings

Provides a best practice framework for peer review based on the literature, where the case study university benchmarks well against the framework and an insight into the perceptions of teaching staff on the scheme.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of 40 teaching staff was from only one faculty, in one university. Before generalising the findings it would be prudent to widen the research to include a larger sample from more universities across the HE sector in the UK.

Practical implications

The research has massive implications for the UK HE sector if peer review is to be used as a method of assessing teaching performance.

Originality/value

The paper is valuable as a guide to senior management wishing to implement a peer observation scheme within their own institution.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Jacqueline Douglas, Robert McClelland and John Davies

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual model of student satisfaction with their higher education (HE) experience, based on the identification of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual model of student satisfaction with their higher education (HE) experience, based on the identification of the variable determinants of student perceived quality and the impact of those variables on student satisfaction and/or dissatisfaction with the overall student experience. The paper will also identify those determinants most likely to have either a positive or negative impact on subsequent student loyalty behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports the results of a study of 163 undergraduate students at Liverpool John Moores University in the UK, which utilised Critical Incident Technique (CIT) as the method that encouraged the recording of situations that the students themselves perceive as critical incidents. It is envisaged that these situations have occurred in their experience of HE teaching, learning and assessment and their experience of other university ancillary service aspects, i.e. within and beyond the classroom experience.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that responsiveness, communication and access are the critical areas that Education Managers need to focus upon. Also the CIT method of data capture could be adapted and adopted by the wider Higher Education sector.

Research limitations/implications

There are a number of limitations with this study. For the quantitative results, the sample size was relatively small and involved only one Faculty within a University. There is also an assumption that the statements made in relation to the loyalty behaviours would actually be acted upon, i.e. they would do what they say. The study is based on the respondents' recollections of past events and it is assumed that these were accurate.

Practical implications

The implications for university managers are that creating and maintaining a responsive, communicative and useful environment is necessary across the teaching, learning and assessment areas, whilst within the Ancillary areas responsiveness, access and socialising are the important factors. Reducing the number of dissatisfying experiences may not be an easy task, but if successful, then improved student recruitment, retention and ultimately financial stability for the Institution should ensue. The wider implication is that CIT should be considered by HEIs as a means of collecting student intelligence.

Originality/value

Critical Incident Technique is a method that is already attractive to many researchers. However, within higher education, the norm is to use traditional student feedback questionnaires which restricts the student to questions that have been predetermined. CIT allows respondents to freely describe their experiences and unreservedly express their feelings without being constrained to specific areas.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Céleste M. Brotheridge and Raymond T. Lee

This introduction aims to highlight the special contributions made by the articles in this issue in understanding how emotions are implicated in the process of managing.

Abstract

Purpose

This introduction aims to highlight the special contributions made by the articles in this issue in understanding how emotions are implicated in the process of managing.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents a model as a means of framing the discussion of the articles included in this issue.

Findings

Argues that emotions and emotional skills are essential for everyday managerial work and that the traditional stereotype of the exclusively rational manager has been replaced by one in which managers are expected to create and nourish positive relationships by effectively managing their own emotions and those of their employees.

Practical implications

Managers need to be aware of the impact that their expressed emotions have on their work units' emotional climate, their employees' emotions, their effectiveness as well as that of their employees, and the organization's overall success.

Originality/value

The paper offers insight into the emotions of managing.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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