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Article
Publication date: 22 January 2021

Michael Sony, Jiju Antony, Jacqueline Ann Douglas and Olivia McDermott

Quality 4.0 is the new buzzword among quality professionals. There has been no empirical study of Quality 4.0 yet. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to investigate what…

Abstract

Purpose

Quality 4.0 is the new buzzword among quality professionals. There has been no empirical study of Quality 4.0 yet. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to investigate what are the motivations, barriers and readiness factors for Quality 4.0 implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an online survey on senior quality professionals working in leading companies in Europe and America. In total, 50 participants participated in this study.

Findings

This study finds the top five motivating, barriers and readiness factors for Quality 4.0 implementation. These factors are ranked in terms of the order of importance as perceived by senior quality professionals.

Research limitations/implications

This is the first empirical study on Quality 4.0 that investigates the motivation, barriers and readiness factors of Quality 4.0. This study provides a theoretical base of Quality 4.0 body of knowledge in terms of its practical relevance and adoption in modern-day organizations.

Practical implications

Organizations can use this study to understand what the motivation and barriers for implementing Quality 4.0. In addition, before implementation of Quality 4.0, the readiness factor for Quality 4.0 can be used by organizations to evaluate their preparedness before the actual implementation of the initiative.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study on Quality 4.0 that captures the viewpoints of senior quality professionals on the motivation, barriers and readiness factors of Quality 4.0.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Michael Sony, Jiju Antony and Jacqueline Ann Douglas

Quality 4.0 is concerned with managing quality in the Industry 4.0 era. Specifically, its focus is on which digital tools are used to enhance an organization’s ability to…

Abstract

Purpose

Quality 4.0 is concerned with managing quality in the Industry 4.0 era. Specifically, its focus is on which digital tools are used to enhance an organization’s ability to reliably give customers high-quality products. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the key ingredients for the effective implementation of Quality 4.0.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative literature review was conducted on the extant works to collate and analyse previous studies in this relatively new field.

Findings

The study revealed eight key ingredients for the effective implementation of Quality 4.0 in organizations, namely: (1) handling big data, (2) improving prescriptive analytics, (3) using Quality 4.0 for effective vertical, horizontal and end-to-end integration, (4) using Quality 4.0 for strategic advantage, (5) leadership in Quality 4.0, (6) training in Quality 4.0, (7) organizational culture for Quality 4.0 and, lastly, (8) top management support for Quality 4.0. These findings have provided a steer for the future research agenda of Quality 4.0.

Practical implications

Organizations can use the eight ingredients to perform a self-assessment on the current state of each element within their own organization. When implementing Quality 4.0, each ingredient should be effectively analysed, and measures taken so that the implementation of Quality 4.0 is effective.

Originality/value

The paper makes the first attempt to present the key ingredients an organization should possess to effectively implement Quality 4.0.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Verónica Flor Vallejo, Jiju Antony, Jacqueline Ann Douglas, Paul Alexander and Michael Sony

Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a continuous improvement methodology that has been adopted by several companies as a strategy to increase their competitive advantage. However, due…

Abstract

Purpose

Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a continuous improvement methodology that has been adopted by several companies as a strategy to increase their competitive advantage. However, due to the misuse of LSS theory in practice, a high rate of implementation failure results. There is a need for a structured and standardised framework to describe how the LSS initiative should be implemented and sustained over time. As a result, this study aims to develop a practical, user-friendly and accurate LSS road map for a Scottish manufacturing small and medium enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach was to analyse existing literature on lean and Six Sigma that included road maps and critical success factors (CSFs) in order to design an in-company, quantitative survey instrument. The aim of the survey was to evaluate employees' perceptions on the importance of LSS CSFs for the successful implementation and sustainability of a continuous improvement initiative. Based on the literature and results from the data collected, an LSS reference guide - in the form of a road map - was designed to support LSS implementation and sustainability.

Findings

A customised LSS reference guide in a road map format for the Scottish SME was proposed. This road map was developed by adopting existing successful road maps from the literature into consideration and then adapting them to fulfil the company's particular perspective on CI. This study complements current literature on LSS road maps and corroborates LSS CSFs as crucial for successful LSS implementation and sustainability, regardless of the type of company and/or culture. However, a degree of importance is ascribed to the organisation's culture.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst a survey was used as the data collection instrument future interviews with employees would enhance the understanding of the organisational culture and hence further improve the road map.

Originality/value

The authors developed a practical and strategic roadmap for a Scottish packaging small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME) which can be used by other similar SMEs. The proposed LSS road map can be replicated and/or adapted for companies in their application of LSS. The methodology by which this study's road map was designed can be used as a guide in the development of further CI road maps.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

S. Vinodh, Jiju Antony, Rohit Agrawal and Jacqueline Ann Douglas

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the history, trends and needs of continuous improvement (CI) and Industry 4.0. Four strategies are reviewed, namely…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the history, trends and needs of continuous improvement (CI) and Industry 4.0. Four strategies are reviewed, namely, Lean, Six Sigma, Kaizen and Sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Digitalization and CI practices contribute to a major transformation in industrial practices. There exists a need to amalgamate Industry 4.0 technologies with CI strategies to ensure significant benefits. A systematic literature review methodology has been followed to review CI strategy and Industry 4.0 papers (n = 92).

Findings

Various frameworks of Industry 4.0, their advantages and disadvantages were explored. A conceptual framework integrating CI strategies and Industry 4.0 is being presented in this paper.

Practical implications

The benefits and practical application of the developed framework has been presented.

Originality/value

The article is an attempt to review CI strategies with Industry 4.0. A conceptual framework for the integration is also being presented.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2020

Yaifa Trakulsunti, Jiju Antony and Jacqueline Ann Douglas

The purpose of this study is to propose a Lean Six Sigma (LSS) roadmap to guide healthcare practitioners in the implementation of LSS along with a customized LSS tool kit…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose a Lean Six Sigma (LSS) roadmap to guide healthcare practitioners in the implementation of LSS along with a customized LSS tool kit for reducing medication errors.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors initially critically reviewed several frameworks/roadmaps of Lean, Six Sigma and LSS which have been proposed in healthcare sector from the existing literature. This review has led to an understanding of key characteristics, limitations and reasons behind the development of such frameworks/roadmaps. A conceptual roadmap was developed and then validated by a number of LSS experts and a healthcare practitioner. Based on the previous studies and taking LSS experts’ opinions into account, a revised roadmap for reducing medication is presented.

Findings

The roadmap for LSS in reducing medication errors is developed. This roadmap includes three phases: Phase 1 cultural readiness for LSS employment in reducing medication errors; Phase 2 preparation, initialization and implementation; and Phase 3 sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The roadmap has been tested with only a handful of practitioners of LSS. Moreover, only two case studies have been carried out in a Thai hospital setting which followed the roadmap. In order to improve the validity of research, more case studies need to be executed and more people should be used for testing the roadmap with varied cultures.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt in the development of a LSS roadmap that healthcare practitioners can follow to reduce medication errors using LSS methodology and sustaining LSS in their organizations.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Jacqueline Douglas, Jiju Antony and Alexander Douglas

The purpose of this paper is to translate the eight wastes of Lean for Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), identify some examples of each waste and to propose…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to translate the eight wastes of Lean for Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), identify some examples of each waste and to propose appropriate Lean solutions to those wastes.

Design/methodology/approach

To identify wastes within HEIs a combination of observation and cause-and-effect analysis utilising brainstorming were employed using a convenience sample of HE academic staff.

Findings

Once all eight wastes were successfully translated for HEIs a range of examples were identified in both academic and support services, including excessive movement of people, over production of materials, excessive inventory and waste of human resources. Appropriate Lean solutions to the identified wastes include the use of 5S, point-of-use-storage, process mapping/value stream mapping and level scheduling.

Research limitations/implications

The cited examples come from a limited number of observations in only a few HEIs. More valid and reliable data would come from a more extensive sample of HEIs.

Practical implications

In order to improve bottom-line performance in times of constrained resources HEIs can reduce waste and hence costs of poor quality by using Lean thinking and accessing, what Joseph Juran (1962) called, “The gold in the mine”. This can be done without reducing the level of services.

Social implications

Particularly in a recession, HEIs need to show that they are using government funding (public money) in the most efficient and effective way possible. Lean thinking can help achieve both these objectives.

Originality/value

Previous papers on Lean thinking applied to HEIs have concentrated on individual processes such as curriculum design or student assessment. This paper takes a holistic view demonstrating how Lean thinking theories can be practically applied across both academic and administrative areas of HEI operations.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Jacqueline Ann Blackmore

This account of internal audit is set within the context of higher education in the UK and a fictitiously named Riverbank University. The study evaluates the recent…

Abstract

This account of internal audit is set within the context of higher education in the UK and a fictitiously named Riverbank University. The study evaluates the recent introduction of “Internal Academic Audit” to the University and compares the process with that of the internationally recognised ISO 19011 Guidelines for Auditing Quality Management Systems, used both in the private and public sectors. A thorough review of the literature on audit theory was conducted in order to gauge best and worst practices. The aim was to identify any theory‐practice gaps between the British Standard guidelines and actual internal academic audit performance, as well as any possible reasons for them. Finally, it is suggested that when compared with the British Standard's model the internal academic audit process is somewhat less robust, particularly in terms of auditor selection and training.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Abstract

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-239-9

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2001

Robert M. Hayes

Abstract

Details

Models for Library Management, Decision Making and Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-792-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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