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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Jackie Reynolds

– The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the benefits and issues relating to arts participation in later life.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the benefits and issues relating to arts participation in later life.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on literature relating to older people's arts participation, and also includes discussion of the author's doctoral research into arts and ageing. The research was a qualitative study, influenced by narrative approaches and life-course perspectives. It involved interviews with 24 participants who have connections with a case-study town in the English Midlands.

Findings

The paper focuses on the findings from six participants belonging to a male voice choir. The themes that are discussed include the importance of continuity; issues of identity; mutual support; impact of ill health and the sustainability of group activities.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small-scale study, based in one case study town. Care should therefore be taken in generalising to different populations and areas. Potential for future research includes: other geographical locations, including larger urban areas. Specific focus on choir participation, or other art form. Involving people from a wider range of ethnic backgrounds.

Social implications

This study adds to a growing body of evidence about the value of arts and culture to society.

Originality/value

This study is original in adopting life-course perspectives to understand later life arts participation. It also offers original insights into the nature of arts-generated social capital and how this may be viewed within a wider context of resourceful ageing.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Simone Bacchini and Gillian Crosby

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Ferhan Kuyucak Şengür and Bijan Vasigh

While airports traditionally have been seen as classic examples of public enterprises, the government’s role in airport management has been changing throughout the world…

Abstract

While airports traditionally have been seen as classic examples of public enterprises, the government’s role in airport management has been changing throughout the world. This study explores airport governance models with a focus on stakeholder issues. Relatively little is known empirically about how public, private, or public–private partnership (PPP) provision of airport services affects different stakeholders. The main aim of this study is to develop a better understanding of the impact of airport governance forms on stakeholders. For this purpose, a theoretical background focused on identifying airport stakeholders and their conflicting interests is followed by a qualitative content analysis using past studies on airport management. The results suggest that a balanced approach is required to deal with stakeholder interests detached from their governance structures.

Details

Stakeholders, Governance and Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-380-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Jackie B. Surtani

The change that the Hong Kong private banking industry hasundergone over the last decade has presented its participants with someinteresting challenges. The traditional…

Abstract

The change that the Hong Kong private banking industry has undergone over the last decade has presented its participants with some interesting challenges. The traditional view of the Hong Kong private banking market as being homogeneous needs to be abandoned. The large number of competing private banking units along with the tremendous growth in this region has also made recruiting well‐qualified private bankers a major problem. Key attributes of an ideal private banker along with suggestions for minimising staff turnover are presented. Moreover, many Hong Kong banks also need to ensure that their internal organisational structure fits with the bank′s private banking strategy.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Book part
Publication date: 6 February 2013

Heather E. Dillaway and Elizabeth R. Paré

Purpose – Within cultural discourse, prescriptions for “good” motherhood exist. To further the analysis of these prescriptions, we examine how media conversations about…

Abstract

Purpose – Within cultural discourse, prescriptions for “good” motherhood exist. To further the analysis of these prescriptions, we examine how media conversations about Republican Vice-Presidential candidate Sarah Palin, Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, and First Lady Michelle Obama during the 2008 presidential election campaign illustrate existing notions of good motherhood.Methods – Using qualitative content analysis techniques, we review media discourse about Palin, Clinton, and Obama during this campaign. We use existing feminist literature on motherhood and an intersectionality perspective to ground our analysis, comparing and contrasting discourse about these political figures.Findings – The 2008 campaign represented a campaign for good motherhood as much as it represented a campaign for the next president. Discourse on Palin, Clinton, and Obama creates three very different characterizations of mothers: the bad, working mother and failed supermom (Palin), the unfeeling, absent mother (Clinton), and the intensive, stay-at-home mother (Obama). The campaign reified a very narrow, ideological standard for good motherhood and did little to broaden the acceptability of mothers in politics.Value of paper – This article exemplifies the type of intersectional work that can be done in the areas of motherhood and family. Applying an intersectionality perspective in the analysis of media discourse allows us to see exactly how the 2008 campaign became a campaign for good motherhood. Moreover, until we engage in an intersectional analysis of this discourse, we might not see that the reification of good motherhood within campaign discourse is also a reification of hegemonic gender, race, class, age, and family structure locations.

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Notions of Family: Intersectional Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-535-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Jackie L. Hartman

A strategic communication system is the vehicle for creating, managing and disseminating an organization’s excellence in design, process, and human capital. We propose…

Abstract

A strategic communication system is the vehicle for creating, managing and disseminating an organization’s excellence in design, process, and human capital. We propose that organizational communication should be measured in an effort to influence the business outcomes and the behavior of shareholders, customers, and employees. An often overlooked asset is an organization’s physical environment and that which it communicates. This article presents the literature addressing the correlation between the physical environment and behaviors as well as an audit inventory that allows an organization to examine its environment from a strategic view in order to align its surroundings with its culture, image, desirable behaviors, and expected outcomes.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Souha R. Ezzedeen

The purpose of this study was to explore negative and stereotype-threatening depictions of career women in Hollywood films. The study draws on stereotype threat research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore negative and stereotype-threatening depictions of career women in Hollywood films. The study draws on stereotype threat research to reflect on how such portrayals might undermine women’s career aspirations and contribute to the glass ceiling’s persistence, and proposes an agenda for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

Bridging social role theories with conceptual models of films as social “texts”, the author explored depictions of 165 career women presented by 137 films, focusing on negative and potentially stereotype-threatening personal and professional characteristics and contexts.

Findings

Thematic analyses of film portrayals revealed negative and stereotype-threatening characteristics and contexts of career women, including their mean and conniving personalities, promiscuity, isolation, failures at intimacy and inability to balance work and family.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the subjective interpretations of a single author, a broad exploratory focus and no empirical evidence of connections between film portrayals and career attitudes. Researchers are encouraged to deepen analyses of film portrayals and examine linkages with stereotype threat and career behaviours sustaining the glass ceiling.

Practical implications

Given the pervasive reach of the media and the potential for consumers to internalize its messages, the negative depictions documented here could bear an adverse effect on women’s career aspirations, contributing to the glass ceiling’s survival.

Originality/value

Questioning the role of the media, in particular the portrayals of career women in film, provides an additional angle to understand why the glass ceiling endures.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

David Clark

It is extremely likely that present trends towards mass divorce and remarriage will lead to some changes in the fertility behaviour of those affected. As remarriages come…

Abstract

It is extremely likely that present trends towards mass divorce and remarriage will lead to some changes in the fertility behaviour of those affected. As remarriages come to represent an increasing proportion of all marriages, it is apparent that childbearing and childrearing practices are diversifying and that our conventional assumptions about parenthood and childhood are going to require fairly continuous revision. In the light of this it is useful to consider some of the more obvious connections between remarriage and fertility and to look at the sort of implications which these might have for relationships between parents and children. Does divorce reduce fertility? Does remarriage increase it? How might divorce and remarriage alter the duration and tempo of the childbearing years and what are the likely family arrangements which might ensue? Such questions raise a number of difficulties when looked at within the established categories of fertility research and I therefore hope to suggest some ways in which data of various kinds may be pieced together in order to provide a reasonably comprehensive picture of the problem.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2018

Matt Bolton and Frederick Harry Pitts

Abstract

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Corbynism: A Critical Approach
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-372-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Jackie L.M. Tam and Susan H.C. Tai

Attempts to segment the female consumers’ market in Greater China (the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) by employing principal component factor analysis…

Abstract

Attempts to segment the female consumers’ market in Greater China (the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) by employing principal component factor analysis and cluster analysis. Psychographic dimensions were generated and the factor scores were computed and used in cluster analysis to develop psychographic segments of the female consumers’ market in Greater China. Four distinct segments were identified and these were labelled as “conventional women” (40.7 per cent of the sample), “contemporary females” (21.9 per cent), “searching singles” (19.4 per cent) and “followers” (18.1 per cent).

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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