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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Edel Murray and Jackie Fox

There has been an increase in swimming in natural bodies of water as reported in personal qualitative accounts. However, limited academic research has explored the meaning of this…

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Abstract

Purpose

There has been an increase in swimming in natural bodies of water as reported in personal qualitative accounts. However, limited academic research has explored the meaning of this occupation. Engaging with nature, exercising and being part of a community contribute to better mental and physical health. The purpose of this research was to explore the meaning that adults attribute to open-water swimming in natural bodies of water.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used phenomenological interviews to explore the meaning that five adults attribute to open-water swimming.

Findings

Open-water swimming contributes to meaning-making in many ways. Participants reported swimming as necessary for maintaining mental and emotional well-being and forming meaningful connections with the social environment, nature and their true selves.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the understanding of the meaning of open-water swimming for adults in Ireland. Understanding the meaning of this occupation may add to the body of evidence exploring blue-space to promote health.

Originality/value

Open-water swimming is an occupation growing in popularity. This is the first paper to explore open-water swimming from an occupational perspective. This may provide an alternative perspective for viewing blue-space engagement and understanding the relationship between health, blue-space occupations and our oceans.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Yaw A. Debrah and Ian G. Smith

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of globalization on…

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Abstract

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of globalization on work and employment in contemporary organizations. Covers the human resource management implications of organizational responses to globalization. Examines the theoretical, methodological, empirical and comparative issues pertaining to competitiveness and the management of human resources, the impact of organisational strategies and international production on the workplace, the organization of labour markets, human resource development, cultural change in organisations, trade union responses, and trans‐national corporations. Cites many case studies showing how globalization has brought a lot of opportunities together with much change both to the employee and the employer. Considers the threats to existing cultures, structures and systems.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Nancy M. Stanley

Endeavours to provide assistance to librarians and supportpersonnel in resolving computer problems. Lists the steps to follow whentroubleshooting a problem or when diagnosing a…

Abstract

Endeavours to provide assistance to librarians and support personnel in resolving computer problems. Lists the steps to follow when troubleshooting a problem or when diagnosing a ′READ′ error.

Details

OCLC Micro, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 8756-5196

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 January 2016

Kati Sweet and Jackie Bruce

In a world where more and more emphasis is being put on the importance of teaching leadership skills to work ready undergraduate students, instructors are often met with the…

Abstract

In a world where more and more emphasis is being put on the importance of teaching leadership skills to work ready undergraduate students, instructors are often met with the challenge of finding current, engaging, real world examples to use in their classrooms. In the case of this application, the instructors propose the use of the characters and video clips from current Fox Network television show Glee to aid in the instruction of Blake & Mouton’s Leadership Grid during a larger discussion of leadership styles.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Jayne Finlay and Jessica Bates

This chapter offers an insight into library provision and user engagement at a Secure College in Northern Ireland. It draws on findings from doctoral research carried out by…

Abstract

This chapter offers an insight into library provision and user engagement at a Secure College in Northern Ireland. It draws on findings from doctoral research carried out by Finlay (2020) which examined the role of the library in the learning experiences of people in prison. The case study described in this chapter took a multi-method qualitative approach to exploring engagement with the space, resources and informal learning programmes offered by the library. Acknowledging the many roles and functions of a prison library, this chapter focuses particularly on its relationship to formal and informal prisoner education. The strong educational ethos of Hydebank Wood College made it an ideal setting to explore the transformative educational possibilities of a well-managed and well-funded library. Following a description of the library and its services, the chapter will consider first steps into learning, informal and self-directed learning opportunities, library services in a divided society, and the importance of interpersonal relationships.

Since the completion of this doctoral research, a newly renovated Learning and Skills Centre has opened at Hydebank Wood College. This chapter includes findings from recent interviews with staff members which reveal the impetus for these changes and how the redesign of the library space has impacted upon the learning experiences of both the women and young men held at Hydebank. Taken alongside the doctoral findings, this discussion helps to show how the library space is valued within the institution and the significant role played by the library and library staff in the lives of incarcerated individuals.

Details

Exploring the Roles and Practices of Libraries in Prisons: International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-861-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Clive G. Long, Ellen Banyard, Emily Fox, Jackie Somers, Denise Poynter and Rachel Chapman

The aim of this paper is to investigate reasons for treatment non‐attendance for dual diagnosis women in secure psychiatric settings.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate reasons for treatment non‐attendance for dual diagnosis women in secure psychiatric settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi structured interview was used to investigate patients' reasons for session non attendance on the day of non participation across four wards. Reasons for non attendance were grouped using the mulifactorial offender readiness model (MORM) categories of affective, volitional, behavioural, cognitive and external. Assignment of responses to categories was undertaken by a two person team and inter rater reliability was assessed.

Findings

Patients' rates of attendance varied by ward and level of security (low vs medium); and diagnosis. Systematic enquiry about the reasons for non attendance led to increased session attendance. Reasons for non attendance were cognitive reflecting negative evaluations of treatment and treatment outcomes. Psychological therapies and educational sessions were deemed the most important along with one‐to‐one clinician appointments.

Originality/value

Issues of treatment engagement and the timing of treatment interventions are major issues in the care of secure psychiatric patients, particularly those with a primary diagnosis of personality disorder. Findings highlight the importance of systematic enquiry about reasons for non attendance and suggest potential interventions designed to improve engagement.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Roberta Julian, Isabelle Bartkowiak-Théron, Jackie Hallam and Clarissa Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential benefits as well as some of the practical barriers to the implementation of a collective impact initiative in law enforcement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential benefits as well as some of the practical barriers to the implementation of a collective impact initiative in law enforcement and public health (LEPH) in Tasmania, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a review of programs, agencies and initiatives that are at the intersection of LEPH in Tasmania, through an analysis of the findings in evaluation reports, and the views of practitioners identified at a workshop on LEPH held at a national AOD conference and facilitated by the authors.

Findings

The strengths of collective impact initiatives, particularly in LEPH, are presented and some weaknesses identified. Some major obstacles to the consolidation of LEPH initiatives include siloed ways of working and budgets, lack of leadership and political will. Some progress has been made in addressing these weaknesses, although addressing complex social problems by moving beyond inter-agency collaboration toward an integrated model of service provision remains challenging.

Practical implications

The authors argue that there are practical benefits to the adoption of a collective impact model to address problems in Tasmania that lie at the nexus between LEPH. In reviewing existing collaborations, the authors demonstrate the value of a structural mapping process to identify ways forward for government and non-government agencies that are inclined to go further in merging the two disciplinary areas. The authors offer some suggestions with respect to identifying the preconditions for a collective impact model and how to build on these to initiate action.

Originality/value

A significant proportion of the literature on LEPH remains at a conceptual and theoretical level. This contribution highlights some practical issues while looking at existing examples of collaboration across LEPH at a state level in Australia, and starts mapping a way forward for constructing more integrative LEPH initiatives.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Julie Napoli and Robyn Ouschan

This study aims to identify the archetypes, moral foundations and plots associated with veganism through the stories told by vegan bloggers and the effect on mainstreaming of this…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the archetypes, moral foundations and plots associated with veganism through the stories told by vegan bloggers and the effect on mainstreaming of this ideology.

Design/methodology/approach

Narrative data was collected from 15 publicly available vegan blogs. Underlying archetypes, morals and story plots were identified and presented as a “story re-told,” highlighting the context and content of what was being said by the protagonists and associated meanings.

Findings

The analysis revealed three moral foundations on which vegan ideology is built: sanctity of life, enacting the authentic self and freedom. A universal hero archetype was also unearthed; however, the moral orientation of the storyteller (agency vs communal) dictated how these morals and archetypes were expressed.

Research limitations/implications

Through the use of common story archetypes, master plots and moral foundations, a deeper understanding of vegans and the choices they make is facilitated, thus making vegan ideology appear less threatening. Storytelling plays an important role in establishing connections through commonality.

Originality/value

This study applies cultivation theory, storytelling analysis and archetype theory to reveal how vegan bloggers counteract mass media cultivation of vegan stereotypes through the stories they tell. We offer a more robust description of vegans, moving beyond stereotypes, and the morals driving behavior. Moreover, a unique mechanism of mainstreaming is exposed that shows vegans connect with people by tapping into universal archetypes and morals that anyone can relate to and relive.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2012

Aimee E.A. King and Paul E. Levy

Recent changes in the economy have altered both the internal and external operations of organizations. In response to the economic downturn, organizations have been forced to…

Abstract

Recent changes in the economy have altered both the internal and external operations of organizations. In response to the economic downturn, organizations have been forced to dramatically change their work practices and processes. Such practices inevitably create concern for employees as resources become more scarce, rewards and processes become more uncertain, and the marketplace becomes more competitive. To avoid these stressful situations and survive within their organizations, workers have to become more flexible and responsive. However, the specific ways in which the economic downturn will affect worker well-being has yet to be determined. In this chapter, we propose an integrative model of the politics– stress relationship and demonstrate the key role played by economic conditions.

Details

The Role of the Economic Crisis on Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-005-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Amy Lubitow and Kathrin Zippel

This chapter identifies the challenges that faculty with children experience as they engage in international research. We explore how these faculty members manage the competing…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter identifies the challenges that faculty with children experience as they engage in international research. We explore how these faculty members manage the competing demands of international research work and parenthood.

Methodology

Data includes qualitative interviews with 42 faculty members who are parents, in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields from 23 Research 1 universities.

Findings

The globalizing nature of research poses insufficiently recognized tensions between international travel and caregiving. Faculty reported three main strategies that enable them to manage work-family conflicts when work takes them abroad. These include: (1) opting out of international research; (2) modifying international travel; and (3) merging international research with caregiving.

Research implications

Work-family conflicts identified at the national level are amplified for international research.

Research limitations

Interview data are self-reports of what faculty members recalled and elected to share; actual behaviors may differ somewhat.

Practical implications

This chapter provides insights that academic institutions might use to support faculty engaged in international research.

Social implications

A failure to understand and support the unique needs of parents in international research settings may compromise active parenthood for faculty, while reinscribing and reinforcing existing gendered disparities in academia. The internationalization of STEM fields, when coupled with a lack of institutional support for parents, presents a mechanism that contributes to the ongoing underrepresentation of women in science and engineering.

Originality

Although similar questions have been considered in national contexts, little research has explored work-family conflicts for parents in an international setting.

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