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Article

Jack S. Goodwin and Robert M. Fulmer

Discusses how an in‐progress management development programmebecame the vehicle of a “cultural revolution” afteracquisition by another company and helped to consolidate…

Abstract

Discusses how an in‐progress management development programme became the vehicle of a “cultural revolution” after acquisition by another company and helped to consolidate the new combined enterprise because of its timely and fortuitous emphasis on team building. Gives details of subsequent development of “Critical Care Management Programs” anchored in a strategic computerized simulation.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Jack S. Goodwin and Stephen G. Franklin

Describes how the authors have effectively employed the BeerDistribution Game, a simulation exercise developed at MIT′s Sloan Schoolof Management, to teach systems…

Abstract

Describes how the authors have effectively employed the Beer Distribution Game, a simulation exercise developed at MIT′s Sloan School of Management, to teach systems concepts and systems thinking to managers. Details a description of how the simulation works and how its typical results are provided. In addition, discusses how to process the results and how to illustrate the application of the concepts to management problems. Demonstrates how management behaviours commonly found in complex business systems lead to dysfunctional management practices as well as poor performance and suggests how alternative ways of thinking (i.e. a systems perspective) are necessary to cope with the problems inherent in these complex situations. Suggestions for ways to extend the learning opportunities provided by the simulation are also provided.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part

Alexandra Kent

Purpose – This chapter examines children's options for responding to parental attempts to get them to do something (directives).Methodology/approach – The data for the…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter examines children's options for responding to parental attempts to get them to do something (directives).

Methodology/approach – The data for the study are video recordings of everyday family mealtime interactions. The study uses conversation analysis and discursive psychology to conduct a microanalysis of sequences of everyday family mealtimes interactions in which a parent issues a directive and a child responds.

Findings – It is very difficult for children to resist parental directives without initiating a dispute. Immediate embodied compliance was the interactionally preferred response option to a directive. Outright resistance was typically met with an upgraded and more forceful directive. Legitimate objections to compliance could be treated seriously but were not always taken as grounds for non-compliance.

Research implications – The results have implications for our understandings of the notions of compliance and authority. Children's status in interaction is also discussed in light of their ability to choose whether to ratify a parent's control attempt or not.

Originality/value of chapter – The chapter represents original work on the interactional structures and practices involved in responding to control attempts by a co-present participant. It offers a data-driven framework for conceptualising compliance and authority in interaction that is based on the orientations of participants rather than cultural or analytical assumptions of the researcher.

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Disputes in Everyday Life: Social and Moral Orders of Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-877-9

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Article

Teresa Serra, Barry K. Goodwin and Allen M. Featherstone

The crop insurance purchase decision for a group of Kansas farmers is analyzed using farm‐level data from the 1990s, a period that experienced many changes in the federal…

Abstract

The crop insurance purchase decision for a group of Kansas farmers is analyzed using farm‐level data from the 1990s, a period that experienced many changes in the federal crop insurance program. Results indicate a reduction in the elasticity of the demand for crop insurance with respect to premium rates by the end of the decade. The reduction in demand elasticity corresponded with a considerable increase in government subsidies by the end of the 1990s. This result may also reflect the attractiveness of new revenue insurance products which may have made producers less sensitive to premium changes.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 63 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Book part

Kerri Milita and Jaclyn Bunch

Just over ten years ago, the American legislative system was rocked by a series of scandals surrounding powerful lobbyist Jack Abramoff who claimed to have “bought”…

Abstract

Just over ten years ago, the American legislative system was rocked by a series of scandals surrounding powerful lobbyist Jack Abramoff who claimed to have “bought” influence in nearly half of the United States congressional offices. The Abramoff scandal brought public attention to three critical areas of corruption in congressional politics: loopholes in gift-giving laws, campaign finance, and the revolving door. For instance, why are lobbyists allowed to buy a meal for congressional representatives if they are both standing up but not if they are sitting down? Why is sharing a simple meal with an elected official banned but allowed so long as campaign contribution checks are exchanged (i.e., the mystery of the $5,000 hamburger)? And just how much does it cost to buy your congressman? We explore these areas of corruption that were brought to light in 2006 by “the biggest political scandal of the century,” and examine how things have, or in some instances, haven’t changed in the years since the Abramoff scandal broke. Does Congress run cleaner today? Or is it still politics as usual?

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Corruption, Accountability and Discretion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-556-8

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Article

Mary Hong Loe and Robert R. Moore

When William Faulkner sent off his manuscript of Sanctuary in 1929 to the publisher Cape and Smith, Harrison Smith responded, “Good God, I can't publish this. We'd both be…

Abstract

When William Faulkner sent off his manuscript of Sanctuary in 1929 to the publisher Cape and Smith, Harrison Smith responded, “Good God, I can't publish this. We'd both be in jail.” From its very inception, Sanctuary, Faulkner's shocking novel of a young co‐ed initiated through rape and murder into the criminal world of hoodlums, was controversial. When Smith sent Faulkner the galleys, the author decided to revise the manuscript. This revised version of Sanctuary, published in 1931, went on to become his most scandalous and, not coincidentally, his best selling work. While The Sound and the Fury and Light in August languished and went out of print, the horrific tale of Temple Drake and the gangster/thug, Popeye, generated sustained sales as well as a flurry of popular interest in the young writer from Mississippi.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Paul Rogers, Michelle Davies and Lisa Cottam

This study investigates the impact that perpetrator coercion type, victim resistance type and respondent gender have on attributions of blame in a hypothetical child…

Abstract

This study investigates the impact that perpetrator coercion type, victim resistance type and respondent gender have on attributions of blame in a hypothetical child sexual abuse case. A total of 366 respondents read a hypothetical scenario describing the sexual assault of a 14‐year‐old girl by a 39‐year‐old man, before completing 21 attribution items relating to victim blame, perpetrator blame, the blaming of the victim's (non‐offending) parents, and assault severity. Overall, men judged the assault more serious when the perpetrator used physical force as opposed to verbal threat or misrepresented play as a coercive act. Men also deemed the victim's non‐offending parents more culpable when the victim offered no resistance, rather than physical or verbal resistance. Women judged the assault equally severe regardless of coercion type, although they did rate the victim's family more culpable when the victim offered verbal rather than physical resistance. Implications and ideas for future work are discussed.

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Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article

Bob Erens, Gerald Wistow, Sandra Mounier-Jack, Nick Douglas, Tommaso Manacorda, Mary Alison Durand and Nicholas Mays

Integrating health and social care is a priority in England, although there is little evidence that previous initiatives have reduced hospital admissions or costs. In…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrating health and social care is a priority in England, although there is little evidence that previous initiatives have reduced hospital admissions or costs. In total, 25 Integrated Care Pioneers have been established to drive change “at scale and pace”. The early phases of the evaluation (April 2014-June 2016) aimed to identify their objectives, plans and activities, and to assess the extent to which they have overcome barriers to integration. In the longer term, the authors will assess whether integrated care leads to improved outcomes and quality of care and at what cost. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods involving documentary analysis, qualitative interviews and an online key informant survey.

Findings

Over time, there was a narrowing of the integration agenda in most Pioneers. The predominant approach was to establish community-based multi-disciplinary teams focussed on (older) people with multiple long-term conditions with extensive needs. Moving from design to delivery proved difficult, as many barriers are outside the control of local actors. There was limited evidence of service change.

Research limitations/implications

Because the findings relate to the early stage of the 5+ years of the Pioneer programme (2014-2019), it is not yet possible to detect changes in services or in user experiences and outcomes.

Practical implications

The persistence of many barriers to integration highlights the need for greater national support to remove them.

Originality/value

The evaluation demonstrates that implementing integrated health and social care is not a short-term process and cannot be achieved without national support in tackling persistent barriers.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Book part

Adrian Favell

In June 2016, a clear majority of English voters chose to unilaterally take the United Kingdom out of the European Union (EU). According to many of the post-Brexit vote…

Abstract

In June 2016, a clear majority of English voters chose to unilaterally take the United Kingdom out of the European Union (EU). According to many of the post-Brexit vote analyses, the single strongest motivating factor driving this vote was “immigration” in Britain, an issue which had long been the central mobilizing force of the United Kingdom Independence Party. The chapter focuses on how – following the bitter demise of multiculturalism – these Brexit related developments may now signal the end of Britain's postcolonial settlement on migration and race, the other parts of a progressive philosophy which had long been marked out as a proud British distinction from its neighbors. In successfully racializing, lumping together, and relabeling as “immigrants” three anomalous non-“immigrant” groups – asylum seekers, EU nationals, and British Muslims – UKIP leader Nigel Farage made explicit an insidious recasting of ideas of “immigration” and “integration,” emergent since the year 2000, which exhumed the ideas of Enoch Powell and threatened the status of even the most settled British minority ethnic populations – as has been seen in the Windrush scandal. Central to this has been the rejection of the postnational principle of non-discrimination by nationality, which had seen its fullest European expression in Britain during the 1990s and 2000s. The referendum on Brexit enabled an extraordinary democratic vote on the notion of “national” population and membership, in which “the People” might openly roll back the various diasporic, multinational, cosmopolitan, or human rights–based conceptions of global society which had taken root during those decades. This chapter unpacks the toxic cocktail that lays behind the forces propelling Boris Johnson to power. It also raises the question of whether Britain will provide a negative examplar to the rest of Europe on issues concerning the future of multiethnic societies.

Details

Europe's Malaise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-042-4

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Book part

David Cunningham and John Noakes

This chapter examines the effects of covert forms of social control on social movement participants. Current social science literature addresses the effect of surveillance…

Abstract

This chapter examines the effects of covert forms of social control on social movement participants. Current social science literature addresses the effect of surveillance on social movement organizations, but stops short of exploring the experience of surveillance for political activists. We begin by reviewing how state social control has been incorporated into paradigmatic social movement models. Drawing on examples from the FBI's counterintelligence programs and the growing literature emphasizing the emotional components of social movement mobilization processes, we then demonstrate the range of direct and indirect costs exerted by social control agents on both organizational and individual targets.

Details

Surveillance and Governance: Crime Control and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1416-4

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