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WE publish this issue on the eve of the Brighton Conference and our hope is that this number of The Library World will assist the objects of that meeting. Everything…

Abstract

WE publish this issue on the eve of the Brighton Conference and our hope is that this number of The Library World will assist the objects of that meeting. Everything connected with the Conference appears to have been well thought out. It is an excellent thing that an attempt has been made to get readers of papers to write them early in order that they might be printed beforehand. Their authors will speak to the subject of these papers and not read them. Only a highly‐trained speaker can “get over” a written paper—witness some of the fiascos we hear from the microphone, for which all papers that are broadcast have to be written. But an indifferent reader, when he is really master of his subject, can make likeable and intelligible remarks extemporarily about it. As we write somewhat before the Conference papers are out we do not know if the plan to preprint the papers has succeeded. We are sure that it ought to have done so. It is the only way in which adequate time for discussion can be secured.

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New Library World, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

JONATHAN NIELD

AGAIN and again, of late, it has been made evident that there is, at the present time, no uniform way of defining the term “historical novel.” A very distinguished…

Abstract

AGAIN and again, of late, it has been made evident that there is, at the present time, no uniform way of defining the term “historical novel.” A very distinguished writer—known as both novelist and critic—has gone so far as to condemn the description “historical” when applied to any novel which depicts figures or events contemporaneous with the author, while another literary man of similar dual attainments and authority, has expressed an altogether contrary opinion, and has defined as “historical” a novel based upon its author's own youthful experiences. Yet again, I have seen it confidently stated in a newspaper article a week or two ago, that any list of historical fiction now put forward, ought to include books reflecting the period 1914–1918, seeing that such period is “one of the most memorable in the world's history.”

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Library Review, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

JONATHAN NIELD

THE scope of this article is, it should be clearly understood, confined to offering a few suggestions that may be found useful by those who desire something more than…

Abstract

THE scope of this article is, it should be clearly understood, confined to offering a few suggestions that may be found useful by those who desire something more than haphazard novel‐reading; no attempt will be made to discuss fiction as a wholes—to survey, for example, the numerous questions with which learned critics have dealt in tracing the experiments and evolutionary influences that have resulted in that form of literature which the word “novel” connotes for us men and women of to‐day. Nor will any appraisal of authors be attempted, though certain individual novelists will, doubtless, be specified by way of illustrating the argument which it is sought to maintain.

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Library Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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HAVING outlined the scheme for monotyped catalogues, it only remains to consider it in its financial aspects. At Hampstead tenders were obtained for the same catalogue by…

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HAVING outlined the scheme for monotyped catalogues, it only remains to consider it in its financial aspects. At Hampstead tenders were obtained for the same catalogue by monotype, linotype, and by ordinary setting up. It may be mentioned that the catalogue is of royal‐octavo size, in double columns, each being fifteen ems wide and fifty deep. Main entries are in bourgeois; subject‐headings are set (by hand) in clarendon, and the entries under such headings are put in brevier. Notes and contents were specified for either minion or nonpareil, and many lines break into part‐italics. The monotype machine provided all these founts except the two already mentioned—italic numerals and clarendon. We had to do without the former type, but the latter not being numerous are easily carried in as wanted from an ordinary case. Naturally, I cannot give the exact figures of the accepted tender, but it may be stated that in our particular case the cheapest quotation was for linotype work, although there was not much difference between that and monotyping; whilst for both these methods worked out at appreciably less than the quotations for ordinary hand‐work.

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New Library World, vol. 5 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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WE have now to regard Indexing from quite another standpoint. Hitherto we have been assuming it to be undertaken from a co‐operative point of view, as in the case of…

Abstract

WE have now to regard Indexing from quite another standpoint. Hitherto we have been assuming it to be undertaken from a co‐operative point of view, as in the case of Poole's Index and also in that of the Review of Reviews. In special work, the greater the magnitude of the task, as in the instance of Science as a whole, and any large divisions of Science, the more likely is co‐operative effort to be required, but speaking generally special indexes are largely the result of individual effort. It is here that that discrepancy in execution, allusion to which has been made earlier, becomes so manifest. It is my principal object to show how these contradictory methods, the natural result of several minds working on no fixed or settled plan, may be avoided. No space, therefore, will be wasted on detailing these inconsistencies, for the reader's and student's interests will be better served by the more positive method of pointing out how to index on a fixed and settled system. As in the previous section practical illustrations will appear later on to demonstrate this.

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New Library World, vol. 6 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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[In view of the approaching Conference of the Library Association at Perth, the following note on the Leighton Library may not be inopportune. Dunblane is within an hour's…

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[In view of the approaching Conference of the Library Association at Perth, the following note on the Leighton Library may not be inopportune. Dunblane is within an hour's railway journey from Perth and has a magnificent cathedral, founded in the twelfth century, which is well worthy of a visit.]

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New Library World, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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THE first of the Islington Public Libraries, opened on September 21st, has proved a phenomenal success, and, at the same time, has thrown an interesting light on several…

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THE first of the Islington Public Libraries, opened on September 21st, has proved a phenomenal success, and, at the same time, has thrown an interesting light on several modern theories in librarianship. It is, as our readers know, the fust of a system of five libraries, towards the erection of which Dr. Carnegie has given £40,000. The building itself is, as many librarians had an opportunity of judging at the “private view” described in our last number, of an exceedingly well‐lighted and attractive character. The arrangement and accommodation provided present several novel features. On the ground floor, opening from the Central Hall, is the Children's Lending Library and Reading Room. This is stocked with about 3,000 volumes for lending purposes, including French and German juvenile literature, and the reading room portion has seating accommodation for about a hundred children. A representative selection of children's magazines are displayed here, and there are special study‐tables for girls and boys equipped with suitable reference collections. A feature of this room is a striking dado of pictures illustrating scenes from English history, which goes far to make the room interesting and attractive.

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New Library World, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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IN The verdict of you all, Rupert Croft‐Cooke has some uncomplimentary things to say about novel readers as a class, which is at least an unusual look at his public by a…

Abstract

IN The verdict of you all, Rupert Croft‐Cooke has some uncomplimentary things to say about novel readers as a class, which is at least an unusual look at his public by a practitioner whose income for many years was provided by those he denigrates.

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New Library World, vol. 65 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

ARUNDELL ESDAILE

I. THE AMATEUR READER. MAKE no mistake: reading is an art, though it may seem as much an instinctive action as eating. It is by no means necessary to read every word of a…

Abstract

I. THE AMATEUR READER. MAKE no mistake: reading is an art, though it may seem as much an instinctive action as eating. It is by no means necessary to read every word of a book to have read it to the best advantage. Skipping and skimming are often condemned as vices of the desultory and idolent, and so indeed they often are, when they are involuntary. But the really expert reader skips and skims deliberately. Like Dr. Johnson, he “tears the heart out of a book.” He has not the time to waste on reading the unessential. Very likely only certain parts of a book are of service to him. Why should he do more than glance over the rest to see that he is missing nothing important to him? You will notice that as you read you take in, not single words at a glance, still less (as a child does) single letters, but whole sentences. That is, I believe, the common rate of reading. But Shelley could read, his eye and mind grasping at one glance an entire paragraph or even page. It does not matter how fast you read, so long as you read with your mind awake. As we all know, very much reading only half holds the attention, and is almost a vice. The morbid craving for printed matter, for any printed matter, no matter what, is not a help, but an active impediment to thinking.

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Library Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

RUDDICK MILLAR

WHY, oh why do we for ever associate romance with moonlit nights, snow‐capped mountains, southern seas, and the sun‐baked alleys of the Far East? Why, when everywhere and…

Abstract

WHY, oh why do we for ever associate romance with moonlit nights, snow‐capped mountains, southern seas, and the sun‐baked alleys of the Far East? Why, when everywhere and every day it is to be found close at hand, whether we live in the solitude of the country or the clangour of the town? The very air is charged with it; the elfin figures of romance dance and weave their intricacies before us, if we have but eyes to see.

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Library Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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