Search results

1 – 10 of 208
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2009

Richard Ely

‘Countrymindedness’ is a resonant but perhaps manufactured term, given wide currency in a 1985 article by political scientist and historian Don Aitkin in the Annual…

Abstract

‘Countrymindedness’ is a resonant but perhaps manufactured term, given wide currency in a 1985 article by political scientist and historian Don Aitkin in the Annual, Australian Cultural History. Political ideology was his focus, as he charted the rise and fall ‐ from the late nineteenth century to around the 1970s ‐ of some ideological preconceptions of the Australian Country Party. These were physiocratic, populist, and decentralist ‐ physiocratic meaning, broadly, the rural way is best. Aitkin claimed the word was used in Country Party circles in the 1920s and 1930s, but gave no examples. Since the word is in no dictionary of Australian usage, or the Oxford Dictionary, coinage may be more recent. No matter. Countrymindedness is a richly evocative word, useful in analysing rural populism during the last Australian century. I suggest it can usefully be extended to analyzing aspects of the inner history of Euro‐settlement in recent centuries.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1972

Frances Collingwood

THE LIFE OF JAMES BALLANTYNE, Scottish printer, is so interlaced with those of his brothers, John and Sandy, and with the misfortunes of Sir Walter Scott, that it is…

Abstract

THE LIFE OF JAMES BALLANTYNE, Scottish printer, is so interlaced with those of his brothers, John and Sandy, and with the misfortunes of Sir Walter Scott, that it is impossible to give any sort of account of him as a single personality. He was bedevilled by influences that twisted what might have been a prosperous career into a condition that came to near financial disaster.

Details

Library Review, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1967

James A. Tait

FOR CATALOGUERS, and librarians generally, 1967 will prove to be a vintage year, the annus mirabilis for the cataloguer, with the publication in January of the American…

Abstract

FOR CATALOGUERS, and librarians generally, 1967 will prove to be a vintage year, the annus mirabilis for the cataloguer, with the publication in January of the American text of the new Anglo‐American Code. The British text is expected to be published in November. The availability in this country of the American text gives some little time for a preview of the British version. The profession has had ample warning; the new code has had a long gestation period. For the Americans, especially, it is the culmination of many years of effort, from their preliminary second edition of the 1908 code in 1941, through the second edition of 1949, the Library of Congress Rules for Descriptive Cataloging of the same year, the Lubetzky Report of 1953, the Draft Code of 1960, to the Paris Principles of 1961. The present code owes very much to its predecessors, particularly the Paris Principles, which were in effect a set of guidelines agreed on internationally to ensure broad international consistency between any future national codes without spelling out the detailed rules. Except for one or two instances the new code follows the Paris Principles closely.

Details

Library Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1972

James A. Tait

THE FLAVOUR of the eigtheenth edition of the Dewey Decimal Classification can perhaps best be appreciated by a quotation from its preface: ‘The Decimal Classification…

Abstract

THE FLAVOUR of the eigtheenth edition of the Dewey Decimal Classification can perhaps best be appreciated by a quotation from its preface: ‘The Decimal Classification Editorial Policy Committee hopes that this Edition 18 will prove to be a happy combination of the high principles of Edition 17 and the ease of use of Edition 16.’ This reference to ‘high’ principles might raise the eyebrows of the founder of the scheme. Ease of use he would heartily endorse. The high principles referred to are the concepts of subject integrity and the hierarchical nature of the schedules and the notation. These particular high principles were suddenly discovered by the editors of Edition 17, though they had been implicit in all classification schemes since 1876, with the exception of J. D. Brown's Subject Classification. In this country we would prefer to call subject integrity ‘classification by discipline’. In spite of this emphasis on classification by discipline, the conflict between this concept and the opposing one of ‘facet analysis’ which was present in previous editions is still present in Edition 18. The two processes work in opposite directions and the basic problem is to decide where classification by discipline should cease and facet analysis begin. Derek Austin, in a talk to the Cataloguing and Indexing Group of the Library Association in April 1967, pointed this out. For example, in 630 Agriculture the method of facet analysis is clearly at work. We have the energy facet stated at 631–632 under operations and problems in agriculture. The crop facet follows at 633–635, with the ability to qualify certain crops by operation and problem. This is pure facet analysis. But, as Austin points out, at 658 Management we find classification by discipline in operation:

Details

Library Review, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

JAMES A. TAIT, K.A. STOCKHAM, GEORGE T. GEDDES, BERNA C. CLARK, ENID M. OSBORNE and J.A.T.

MALTBY, ARTHUR. U.K. catalogue use survey. London: Library Association, 1973. 35 p. Library Association research publication, no. 12. £1.25 (£1 to members). This report on…

Abstract

MALTBY, ARTHUR. U.K. catalogue use survey. London: Library Association, 1973. 35 p. Library Association research publication, no. 12. £1.25 (£1 to members). This report on the use and non‐use of the catalogue by readers describes the findings of a project carried out largely by the various schools of librarianship in April/May 1971. Two previous pilot studies had been carried out to refine the questionnaire to make it applicable throughout the United Kingdom. Special libraries were reluctantly excluded, but all other types of library were included. The method chosen was that of briefed interviewers and a structured interview, largely because it seemed desirable to catch not only those who use the catalogue, but also those who do not. Of the total of 3,252 interviewed, 1914 (59 per cent) actually used the catalogue; of the 41 per cent who never used the catalogue, the vast majority stated that they could manage without it, while 281 preferred to ask the staff. Probably most of this group went straight to the shelves. From the break‐down by type of library, it would seem that municipal and county libraries hardly need a catalogue at all. There is also the point that if more people had been shown how to use the catalogue, more would use it.

Details

Library Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1969

THE greatly increased interest in historical studies since the second world war has been, I hope, a welcome challenge to librarians, but it has been very difficult to meet…

Abstract

THE greatly increased interest in historical studies since the second world war has been, I hope, a welcome challenge to librarians, but it has been very difficult to meet it. That the librarians of our new universities should have had little research material to offer was only to be expected. Unfortunately, research scholars have discovered that our older libraries were also deficient, that source materials had either not been purchased, in the years when they were readily available, or had been acquired only to be discarded at a later date. Recently, therefore, both old libraries and new have found themselves in competition for a small and dwindling supply of out‐of‐print publications.

Details

New Library World, vol. 70 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1967

John Sherman and Robert S. Nugent

NEARLY TWO DECADES OF LABOUR in what used to be called ‘the groves of academe’ affords one a familiarity with the denizens of those misty woodlands. One remembers well the…

Abstract

NEARLY TWO DECADES OF LABOUR in what used to be called ‘the groves of academe’ affords one a familiarity with the denizens of those misty woodlands. One remembers well the groves of yesteryear. Perhaps, because of the general twentieth‐century lack of conservation, time has not passed lightly over the stretches of hoary deciduous and coniferous perennials in this historic arboretum.

Details

Library Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1965

Alison Douglas

THE MAJOR CONTRIBUTION, though not the only one, has been made by Scottish authors, both by the well‐known ones, such as R. L. Stevenson and J. M. Barrie, in whose work…

Abstract

THE MAJOR CONTRIBUTION, though not the only one, has been made by Scottish authors, both by the well‐known ones, such as R. L. Stevenson and J. M. Barrie, in whose work their Scottish origin has played its part, and by others, like Norman Macleod and Ian Maclaren, whose reputation scarcely extended outside their native country or has been since forgotten.

Details

Library Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1973

THE proposed new central library for Portsmouth, for which the foundation stone was laid by the Lord Mayor at the beginning of December, looks from its plans to be a

Abstract

THE proposed new central library for Portsmouth, for which the foundation stone was laid by the Lord Mayor at the beginning of December, looks from its plans to be a satisfying building, of architectural interest, which incorporates admirably up‐to‐date ideas of reader service and staff needs.

Details

New Library World, vol. 74 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1967

All items listed may be borrowed from the Aslib Library, except those marked, which may be consulted in the Library.

Abstract

All items listed may be borrowed from the Aslib Library, except those marked, which may be consulted in the Library.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

1 – 10 of 208