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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Maxime Desmarais-Tremblay and Marianne Johnson

Alvin Hansen and John Williams’ Fiscal Policy Seminar at Harvard University is widely regarded as a key mechanism for the spread of Keynesianism in the United States. An…

Abstract

Alvin Hansen and John Williams’ Fiscal Policy Seminar at Harvard University is widely regarded as a key mechanism for the spread of Keynesianism in the United States. An original and regular participant, Richard A. Musgrave was invited to prepare remarks for the fiftieth anniversary of the seminar in 1988. These were never published, though a copy was filed with Musgrave’s papers at Princeton University. Their reproduction here is important for several reasons. First, it is one of the last reminiscences of the original participants. Second, the remarks make an important contribution to our understanding of the Harvard School of macro-fiscal policy. Third, the remarks provide interesting insights into Musgrave’s views on national economic policymaking as well as the intersection between theory and practice. The reminiscence demonstrates the importance of the seminar in shifting Musgrave’s research focus and moving him to a more pragmatic approach to public finance.

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Including a Symposium on Robert Heilbroner at 100
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-869-7

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2016

Christin Mellner, Göran Kecklund, Michiel Kompier, Amir Sariaslan and Gunnar Aronsson

Employees have gained increased flexibility in organizing their work in time and space, that is boundaryless work. Managing the boundaries between work and personal life…

Abstract

Employees have gained increased flexibility in organizing their work in time and space, that is boundaryless work. Managing the boundaries between work and personal life would seem to be crucial if one is to psychologically detach from work during leisure in order to unwind and get sufficient sleep. Drawing from a sample of Swedish professional workers (N = 3,846), a theoretical model was proposed testing the inter-relationships between boundaryless work in time and space, weekly work hours, psychological detachment, sleeping problems and sleep duration using a structural equation modelling (SEM) analysis. Findings showed that working boundlessly in time, that is spread out during the working day and week, was directly associated with both long weekly work hours and lack of psychological detachment. In contrast, working boundlessly in space, that is at several different places, was inversely associated with weekly work hours and had no association with psychological detachment. Psychological detachment, in turn, was directly associated with sleeping problems and inversely associated with sleep duration. Sleeping problems were inversely associated with sleep duration. Employees with long weekly work hours had a low degree of sleeping problems. There was also no association between long weekly work hours and sleep duration. These findings contradict earlier research, however, we interpret these findings as that if one works a great deal but is able to mentally detach from work-related feelings and thoughts during free time, then sleep will not be hampered because perseverative cognitions associated with prolonged biological activation will have been interrupted. As such, psychological detachment can be regarded as the mechanism that mediates the relationships between working ‘anytime’ and long weekly work hours, and sleep. It was concluded working boundlessly in time increases the likelihood for long weekly work hours and lack of psychological detachment. Hence, employees working ‘anytime – all the time’ run the risk of ‘always being on’ resulting in disturbed sleep.

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New Ways of Working Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-303-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1949

While some libraries have done their best over the years to inform the public as to what they are doing and can do as regards helping readers, others seem to move along…

Abstract

While some libraries have done their best over the years to inform the public as to what they are doing and can do as regards helping readers, others seem to move along without making any special effort to publicise their facilities. In the old days modesty was a virtue, but now it is its own reward. Government departments, which used to shun the limelight, now employ public relations officers in large numbers, and professional bodies and big business houses constantly seek publicity. Times have changed, and the battle is to the strong; and it is unfortunately generally felt that the institution or service that does not speak for itself has little to speak about. It may frankly be said that if a service is in a position to enlarge its sphere of influence and esteem it should do so to the utmost of its endeavour. But it will be granted that if its publicity is not justified by performance, there will likely be an unhappy reaction.

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Library Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1954

J.W. BUCHANAN

Perhaps it was because I had recently been reading Swift's Battle of the Books, but what I know for certain is that I shall always laugh at those people who tell me that…

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Perhaps it was because I had recently been reading Swift's Battle of the Books, but what I know for certain is that I shall always laugh at those people who tell me that libraries are like sanctuaries, oases of peace in a raucous world. I used to believe that. Not now: not after what happened last night when I was left alone in the library. Did I say alone? Well, now, that's not quite right. But let me tell you about it.

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Library Review, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1956

J.W. BUCHANAN

At one point in My Writing Life Neil Bell casually remarks of one of his novels: “All I had to do was sit down and let my pen rip: and let it rip I did to the tune of…

Abstract

At one point in My Writing Life Neil Bell casually remarks of one of his novels: “All I had to do was sit down and let my pen rip: and let it rip I did to the tune of about 4,000 words a day for five or six weeks.” This is facility indeed, but almost certainly many will view such facility with envy tempered with disapproval. Writers boast or confess at their own risk. Trollope's reputation suffered when he confessed in his Autobiography that he worked to a scheme and by the clock and that he considered novel‐writing to be just another of the educated professions. Thereafter, to some literary snobs, he was little more than a self‐condemned journeyman. On the other side there was Stevenson who admitted that he had “played the sedulous ape” and that he took infinite pains in his writing. He thereupon became suspect as a mere weaver of words. It is a vicious world: confess and be damned.

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Library Review, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1958

ERIK J. SPICER

With comments by J. C. Harrison, Prof. Raymond Irwin, and W. B. Paton.

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With comments by J. C. Harrison, Prof. Raymond Irwin, and W. B. Paton.

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Library Review, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

A.V. Scott and W.J. Buchanan

This paper outlines the inclusions in laminates that can cause the false rejection in printed circuit board (PCB) manufacture. Laminate inclusions are now becoming…

Abstract

This paper outlines the inclusions in laminates that can cause the false rejection in printed circuit board (PCB) manufacture. Laminate inclusions are now becoming prevalent because of the higher resolution required for the inspection of reduced track and gap widths. Visual methods have been used to identify four main types of inclusions; these are: tadpoles, resin burnt, metal, and others. Tadpoles have been identified for the first time, and are small black‐tailed formations. Metal inclusions contain three main metallic components: chromium, iron and titanium. The paper also outlines the possible sources of these inclusions. For tadpole inclusions, the paper discusses the use of Scanning Electron‐Microscope Energy Disperse X‐Ray analysis to identify their constituent elements. Other methods of analysis are also discussed, such as Fourier Transform Infra‐Red analysis.

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Circuit World, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Louis M. Imbeau

Based on a formalization of the 1981 constitutional negotiation in Canada, this article analyses the impact of procedural constraints on collective decisions. Four…

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Based on a formalization of the 1981 constitutional negotiation in Canada, this article analyses the impact of procedural constraints on collective decisions. Four procedural constraints are considered: voting procedures, voting rules, decision rules, and the order of presentation of options to the vote. Sincere voting (voting according to a voter's preference scale), complete information, and free communication are assumed in the first part of the analysis. The assumption of sincere voting is relaxed in the second part where strategic voting is considered The analysis shows that (1) a collective decision is determined by some interaction of voters' preferences, procedural constraints, and voting strategies, and (2) procedural constraints can be ordered in terms of their relative impact on the collective decision (in decreasing order: decision rules, voting rules, order of presentation, voting procedures). In the conclusion, a general model of the determination of collective decisions is presented.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Teresa A. Sullivan

This chapter examines the ways in which some organizations overstep their bounds by making unlimited claims on their employees’ lives. Organizations that do this are…

Abstract

This chapter examines the ways in which some organizations overstep their bounds by making unlimited claims on their employees’ lives. Organizations that do this are described as “greedy institutions,” using the term coined by sociologist Lewis Coser. Sullivan explains how modern technologies and other factors have enabled employers to make increasing claims on employees, extending the workday beyond its traditional limits and overworking the employees. Technologies such as smart phones have enabled employers to get greedier – often while appearing to do just the opposite. For example, an employer can appear to be generous to employees by issuing company-funded smart phones, but those smart phones become tethers that keep the employees attached to their work and their supervisors 24/7. Sullivan argues that while many corporations are greedy, some universities are now also becoming greedy, partially because of increasing demands for productivity and efficiency in higher education. Sullivan discusses these issues within the context of the work of Randy Hodson, who influenced Sullivan’s thinking and writing on this topic.

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A Gedenkschrift to Randy Hodson: Working with Dignity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-727-1

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2008

Wendy Simpson, Graham Buchanan and Graham Monteith

Playfield Institute is a unique partnership between child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and public health. The institute model is an innovative response to…

Abstract

Playfield Institute is a unique partnership between child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and public health. The institute model is an innovative response to the national challenge to mainstream mental health. Its focus is to build the capacity of frontline workers (otherwise known as the children's workforce eg. school nurses, social workers, teachers, foster carers etc.) to promote the mental health of children and young people. It works by providing a multi‐agency forum for sharing information and developing practical skills on how to help children flourish. It also encourages reflection on practice and undertakes research that has a direct impact on the development of training and practice. To date, the Institute has achieved the following main outcomes: the facilitation of a successful training programme, the development of a well used, effective, online resource and the co‐ordination of a range of applied research projects. This paper discusses why the Institute was set up, what it is, what it has achieved and how the model is sustainable.

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The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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