Search results

1 – 10 of over 19000
Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2022

Dori A. Cross, Julia Adler-Milstein and A. Jay Holmgren

The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and digitization of health data over the past decade is ushering in the next generation of digital health tools that leverage…

Abstract

The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and digitization of health data over the past decade is ushering in the next generation of digital health tools that leverage artificial intelligence (AI) to improve varied aspects of health system performance. The decade ahead is therefore shaping up to be one in which digital health becomes even more at the forefront of health care delivery – demanding the time, attention, and resources of health care leaders and frontline staff, and becoming inextricably linked with all dimensions of health care delivery. In this chapter, we look back and look ahead. There are substantive lessons learned from the first era of large-scale adoption of enterprise EHRs and ongoing challenges that organizations are wrestling with – particularly related to the tension between standardization and flexibility/customization of EHR systems and the processes they support. Managing this tension during efforts to implement and optimize enterprise systems is perhaps the core challenge of the past decade, and one that has impeded consistent realization of value from initial EHR investments. We describe these challenges, how they manifest, and organizational strategies to address them, with a specific focus on alignment with broader value-based care transformation. We then look ahead to the AI wave – the massive number of applications of AI to health care delivery, the expected benefits, the risks and challenges, and approaches that health systems can consider to realize the benefits while avoiding the risks.

Details

Responding to the Grand Challenges in Health Care via Organizational Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-320-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2014

Giampiero Giacomello

This chapter examines the phenomenon of cyberterrorism, which is a form of terrorism that could be potentially devastating as terrorists could, through computer networks, wreak…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines the phenomenon of cyberterrorism, which is a form of terrorism that could be potentially devastating as terrorists could, through computer networks, wreak havoc in the critical infrastructure of an advanced country.

Methodology/approach

Review of relevant literature.

Findings

The chapter argues that there are actually two types of cyberterrorism: “Hard-Rock” and “Lite.” Both are potential “force multiplier” for terrorists. The former relies on attacking a country’s infrastructures via computer networks and blocking the working of critical functions like water and energy distribution and the like. Because of its complexity and costs, this type of cyberterrorism is far from frequent and actually almost non-existent. The latter type (Lite) is much more commonplace and is the capability by terrorist organizations to use the Web (and the Internet) to communicate with their affiliates, recruit new elements and, most importantly, publicize their deeds.

Research limitations/implications

Because the use of the Web and the Internet by terrorists give intelligence agencies more opportunities to actually monitor them, this form of terrorism is much more a “double-edged sword” than regular terrorism.

Originality/value of the chapter

The chapter tries to better classify and compare the two forms of cyberterrorism; it also shows how remote the prospect of Hard-Rock Cyberterrorism still is.

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

John S.A. Edwards, Heather J. Hartwell, William G. Reeve and Joachim Schafheitle

The purpose of this research is to establish whether the meals provided by the prison service enable prisoners to follow government guidelines on nutrition and healthy eating, and…

1895

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to establish whether the meals provided by the prison service enable prisoners to follow government guidelines on nutrition and healthy eating, and the extent to which they do so.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of eight prisons, four male (category A, B and C), two female and two young offenders' institutes were randomly identified and visited. Data collection involved taking three days of cyclical menus, the institution's recipes and methods and standard or average portion sizes to calculate the mean nutrient composition of standard, healthy, vegetarian/vegan and Halal menus. Menus were also analysed to establish how well they conformed to the “Balance of Good Health”.

Findings

Results show that, with the exception of some nutrients, prisoners have access to and are able to choose a nutritionally balanced diet and in the main do so. All prisons have attempted to make available menus that conform to the Balance of Good Health model; however, in some cases, choice is hampered, primarily because menus have not been annotated accurately; some dishes are not always as healthy as they might or could be; and prisoners in most cases do not actually understand what constitutes a healthy balanced diet.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of data on prison food service and as such this original work adds to the body of knowledge in the field.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Andrew Ilachinski

Artificial‐life techniques – specifically, agent‐based models and evolutionary learning algorithms – provide a potentially powerful new approach to understanding some of the…

Abstract

Artificial‐life techniques – specifically, agent‐based models and evolutionary learning algorithms – provide a potentially powerful new approach to understanding some of the fundamental processes of war. This paper introduces a simple artificial‐like “toy model” of combat called Enhanced ISAAC Neural Simulation Tool (EINSTein). EINSTein is designed to illustrate how certain aspects of land combat can be viewed as self‐organized, emergent phenomena resulting from the dynamical web of interactions among notional combatants. EINSTein's bottom‐up, synthesist approach to the modeling of combat stands in stark contrast to the more traditional top‐down, or reductionist approach taken by conventional military models, and represents a step toward developing a complex systems theoretic toolbox for identifying, exploring, and possibly exploiting self‐organized emergent collective patterns of behavior on the real battlefield. A description of the model is provided, along with examples of emergent agent patterns and behaviors.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Hyeyeon Kim and Jinkyung Choi

The growing prevalence of single-person households in South Korea has started to affect the country’s restaurant business. The phenomenon has led to changes in how the interiors…

Abstract

Purpose

The growing prevalence of single-person households in South Korea has started to affect the country’s restaurant business. The phenomenon has led to changes in how the interiors of food service establishments are designed. The purpose of this paper is to measure consumers’ emotions when they ate alone and when they saw someone else eating alone to investigate how these emotions can be used in marketing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected via self-administered surveys to individuals in Daejeon in South Korea. A total of 163 respondents were surveyed and divided into two groups on the basis of their frequency of eating alone: low frequency of eating alone and high frequency of eating alone (HEA). The HEA group was further sub-divided to identify significant differences in greater detail. An independent t-test and descriptive analyses were conducted on the data.

Findings

Significant differences were observed in the emotions of “be proud of oneself,” “sadness,” “extroversion,” and “loneliness.” A majority of the respondents ate alone because it saved them time. They also preferred to eat home meal replacements when they ate alone.

Originality/value

The results of this study help understand consumers’ emotions when eating alone in relation to their behaviors at food service establishments. They can inform decisions on market strategies developed by food businesses targeting single consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Lorraine Brown, John Edwards and Heather Hartwell

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the changes in emotion brought by eating the midday meal. Many aspects of eating out have been studied, yet emotions remain an

2801

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the changes in emotion brought by eating the midday meal. Many aspects of eating out have been studied, yet emotions remain an under‐researched area, despite having been shown to play a significant role in food consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports findings from a qualitative study, involving semi‐structured interviews with British undergraduates about changes in their emotional state after eating their lunchtime meal. Data were analysed through the technique of thematic analysis.

Findings

Participants observed a clear relationship between their emotions and eating a meal, with changes noted in concentration, energy and happiness levels. The quality of the food eaten was an issue of concern to participants; access to a healthy meal was seen to be important, given the perceived benefits for emotional and physical health. Finally, eating was deemed to be both a physical and social activity. Eating in company enhanced the emotional experience of dining, as it offered the opportunity to bond with friends. Recommendations for further research are made.

Originality/value

This research addresses a paucity of information on the link between food and emotion, helping to better understand the role of emotions when eating out. Further research into different settings is called for in order to broaden the understanding of the relationship between eating and emotional state, and to find out whether or not similar findings emerge from alternative settings.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Abdul Rais A.R., Zahari M.S.M., Chik C.T. and Hanafiah M.H.

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the inter-relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase behaviour in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the inter-relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase behaviour in the hospital setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model proposed comprises of five latent variables representing healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase behaviour. A total of 570 completed questionnaires were collected, and the hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study found that eating behaviour and satisfaction significantly mediates the relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes and customers’ post-purchase behaviour. Meanwhile, customers’ perceived value weakly moderates the relationship between healthy cafeteria and eating behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first few which attempt to holistically measure the attributes that influence people to visit healthy cafeterias and the subsequent effect they have towards their post-purchase behaviour. The novelty of this study is portrayed through the inclusion of eating behaviour and the perceived value dimension in healthy foodservice study, which is still minimal compared to commercial foodservice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

J.S.A. Edwards, S.P.L. Travis and A.L. Dinmore

Individuals who ascend to altitude too rapidly invariably develop acute mountain sickness (AMS) although a high carbohydrate diet may lessen these symptoms. Specific questions…

878

Abstract

Individuals who ascend to altitude too rapidly invariably develop acute mountain sickness (AMS) although a high carbohydrate diet may lessen these symptoms. Specific questions addressed in this study were: changes in diet prior to sojourning at altitude; changes in food consumption/nutritional intake, food acceptability, flavour and taste intensities. Nineteen subjects assembled for three days at sea level for baseline measurements consuming a diet of dehydrated rations. This regimen was repeated 18 days later in the Bolivian Andes at approximately 5,600m once subjects were acclimatised. Results confirm a common phenomenon; a reduced dietary intake and body weight loss at high altitude. Other results, flavour and taste intensities and overall food acceptability indicate the suitability of these foods in both environments.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 January 2012

David S. Bright, Elizabeth Fisher Turesky, Roger Putzel and Thomas Stang

From the perspective of emergence, professors can facilitate and shape a class as a complex, adaptive, and living system. A case study illustrates phases of emergence in the…

Abstract

From the perspective of emergence, professors can facilitate and shape a class as a complex, adaptive, and living system. A case study illustrates phases of emergence in the classroom by tracing how a professor may use this perspective to empower students to share in the leadership of the classroom. Instead of presenting lessons, the professor facilitates emergent activity, creating a classroom structure where students practice leadership behaviors. In this classroom structure, the professor assumes the leadership roles of coach and facilitator. As a result students building the classroom culture together they connect with each other: they develop strong relationships, take initiative, and learn important lessons about leadership. This article concludes with design principles for establishing a classroom of shared leadership in any teaching environment in any subject.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1987

J.S.A. Edwards

The implications which nutrition has for health are major considerations in all areas of food management. The paper draws together some of the points considered during the course…

Abstract

The implications which nutrition has for health are major considerations in all areas of food management. The paper draws together some of the points considered during the course of a major conference and outlines possible approaches to the application of nutrition in food management. Research into the diet of the military, and the understanding amongst different ranks of dietary issues, is described.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 89 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 19000