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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

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New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Constant Okello‐Obura, M.K. Minishi‐Majanja, Linda Cloete and J.R. Ikoja‐Odongo

This article is a result of part of a doctoral study in the University of South Africa on the topic business information systems (BIS) design for Uganda's economic…

Abstract

Purpose

This article is a result of part of a doctoral study in the University of South Africa on the topic business information systems (BIS) design for Uganda's economic development: the case of small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in northern Uganda conducted between 2004 and 2007. The study was conducted to establish the characteristics of the SMEs, business activities, business information needs and recommend the important business information needs required for BIS for poor country or region. It was carried out on the assumption that businesses in northern Uganda are lagging behind because of lack of a BIS that could facilitate efficient and effective business information access. This article aims to discuss this subject.

Design/methodology/approach

The descriptive survey research design was used to collect the required data using structured questionnaires and semi‐structured interview guide. A sample size of 251 SMEs, 75 information providers and 25 business policy makers in northern Uganda were used. Quantitative data obtained were analysed using Epi Info and SPSS while the qualitative data by use of content analysis technique.

Findings

The findings reveal that SMEs in northern Uganda have varying background and are engaged in diverse/varied business activities with varying business information needs that require a multifaceted approach in the provision of business information. The study recommends that a BIS unique to the SMEs in northern Uganda be designed to provide among others business legal information, business technical information, business economic information, business contacts information and business management skills information.

Originality/value

No research has been carried out on the business information activities and needs of SMEs in northern Uganda with a view to design BIS. The findings of the study will help to shape the planning and implementation of strategic interventions to transform northern Uganda using information as a catalyst for development.

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Library Management, vol. 29 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Richard Masaranga Atuti and J.R. Ikoja‐Odongo

Discusses an innovation in the Kenya National Library Service, the Camel Library Service (CLS) in North Eastern Province, Kenya. Highlights results of an investigation of…

Abstract

Discusses an innovation in the Kenya National Library Service, the Camel Library Service (CLS) in North Eastern Province, Kenya. Highlights results of an investigation of the impact and the feasibility of the CLS pilot project and its compatibility to the lifestyle of nomadic pastoralists. The instruments used in the survey included questionnaires, interviews, documentary analysis and a literature search. Data from the field was adapted, coded, summarized statistically and analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Services (SPSS). The findings show that animal transport (camel) as a mobile library provides an adequate alternative and successful model for a service on wheels. The CLS was also found an effective channel of maximizing the use of National Library information resources by nomadic pastoralists. A review of its performance indicates the project is viable and can be adapted, replicated and expanded.

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Library Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Christine Urquhart and Alison Yeoman

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether there is a need to consider gender or sex differences as variables in information behaviour research and, if so, how?

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether there is a need to consider gender or sex differences as variables in information behaviour research and, if so, how?

Design/methodology/approach

A metasynthesis approach is used. A preliminary framework to categorise information behaviour research on women is developed by integrating main themes from feminist research and information behaviour research. Within each category, studies are compared and contrasted, to identify similar and divergent themes. Themes are then compared across categories, to synthesise the main concepts.

Findings

The categorisation works for most studies, apart from a group of studies on health information use, communicating risk and decision making. The meta‐synthesis indicates the importance of concepts such as situation (as mesh), intermediaries (as node with connections), and connecting behaviour. Gender‐related or, rather gender‐ascribed, constructs, such as concern for others, not gender alone are likely to be important variables in information behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The meta‐synthesis is a top‐level synthesis, as the number of studies prohibited a more detailed approach. Further meta‐synthesis of a few high quality research studies would help to confirm the findings.

Practical implications

The synthesis illuminates a different perspective on information behaviour: the network of information users rather than the individual information seeker.

Originality/value

The synthesis integrates some feminist research themes with information behaviour research, and the findings have implications for general information behaviour research.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 66 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Alex Hope

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of knowledge transfer partnership (KTP)as a means for universities to generate and exchange knowledge to foster sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of knowledge transfer partnership (KTP)as a means for universities to generate and exchange knowledge to foster sustainable cities and societies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on a series of separate yet interrelated KTPs between a university and the local authority in the North East of England, designed to enhance the environmental, social and economic performance of a large-scale urban housing procurement project.

Findings

Results from the partnerships indicate that KTPs may play a crucial role in developing capacity within local authorities tasked with creating sustainable cities and societies, whilst at the same time, enhancing skills and knowledge within the communities whom they represent and their industry partners.

Originality/value

The paper contributes an understanding as to how universities can act as a conduit for the generation and exchange of knowledge for sustainability. It presents a case study which examines how a series of KTPs can provide a useful mechanism for enhancing environmental, social and economic sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Esharenana E. Adomi

To survey the effects of a general price increase on cybercafé services in Abraka, Nigeria. The price increase introduced in September 2004 by the Association of Cybercaf…

Abstract

Purpose

To survey the effects of a general price increase on cybercafé services in Abraka, Nigeria. The price increase introduced in September 2004 by the Association of Cybercafé Operators in Abraka (ACOA) failed due to customers’ responses to it. The collapse of the pricing regime is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Uses a literature review, questionnaire, interviews, and personal observations to gather data, and uses these data to determine reasons behind the pricing structure of cybercafés in Abraka, Nigeria, and customers' reactions to those pricing structures.

Findings

Findings revealed that the cost of providing an alternative electrical power source ranked highest in what determined the price of cybercafé services prior to the period of the general price increase, followed by the ISP charge. A majority of the cybercafés experienced a drop in customer/client patronage, followed by a drop in daily income and customer dissatisfaction, due to the increased prices for internet service.

Originality/value

All the cafés have reduced their prices in order to satisfy their customers. Most of them reduced their prices in order to increase customer/user patronage. It was suggested that an increase in cybercafé service prices should not be introduced again to permit more users access and to encourage them to use the internet in the cafés.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Nico Ulmer and Kerstin Wydra

Research on sustainability in higher education institutions (HEIs) is unequally distributed globally. The existing publications on sustainability in HEIs have largely…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on sustainability in higher education institutions (HEIs) is unequally distributed globally. The existing publications on sustainability in HEIs have largely focussed on the Global North. Meanwhile, little is known about the state of sustainability in HEIs located in the Global South, and within African HEIs in particular. This study aims to fill this gap and investigates the status of sustainability activities in participating African HEIs.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi study involving 32 experts from 16 African countries and a total of 29 HEIs was conducted between December 2017 and May 2018. Experts were asked to share their insights on sustainability and Africanisation through an online questionnaire in two rounds.

Findings

Although 30 of the 32 participants agreed with the provided definitions of sustainability and sustainable development (two participants did not answer), 11 of the participants commented that important issues such as governance and culture were missing. This trend indicates that the sustainability discussion is still led from a western vantage point. Nevertheless, Africanisation plays a role in around two-thirds of participating HEIs’ sustainability activities, with the language factor representing the most pressing issue.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study provide valuable insights into the current state of sustainability activities and Africanisation of participating African HEIs, and the importance of language and culture in this process.

Originality/value

This study is one of few works that have investigated the state of sustainability activities in African HEIs. Furthermore, it adopts a positive stance on sustainability in Africa, rather than focussing on negative circumstances.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Richard M. Atuti

Adapted library buildings hinder rather than aid the optimum organisation and use of the library and information services, a situation which often puts librarians in…

Abstract

Adapted library buildings hinder rather than aid the optimum organisation and use of the library and information services, a situation which often puts librarians in difficulties by their reacting to problems, rather than anticipating them. A survey of some ten community libraries of the Kenya National Library Service (KNLS) was carried out in September 2000, the findings of which revealed to the contrary that most buildings had fulfilled their changed function and are effective functional libraries that provide “customers” with a choice of best value. In the survey, overall characteristics of the buildings are reflected in terms of type, size, method and calculations. Factors affecting use were examined using interview and observation methods.

Details

Library Review, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Esharenana E. Adomi, Benson Oghenevwogaga Adogbeji and A.A. Oduwole

This paper sets out to investigate cybercafés' change of internet service providers (ISPs) in Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to investigate cybercafés' change of internet service providers (ISPs) in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Employs a survey design using questionnaires to collect data from 89 cybercafé entrepreneurs/managers in four states of Nigeria (Delta, Edo, Lagos, and Ogun), and analyses the data using frequency counts and percentages.

Findings

The findings reveal that most cybercafés were established between 2002 and 2003. The majority of the cybercafés have ten PCs connected to the net, while a greater number of them are connected to the net via wireless means. A good number of cybercafés have changed ISPs once. The lack of or poor technical support and frequent loss of contact/signals with the ISP were two of the reasons reported for cybercafés changing their ISP. Cybercafés would like ISPs to increase their speed of transmission, etc., to serve them better. It is recommended that cybercafés should obtain adequate information before engaging ISPs, and that ISPs should conduct periodic customer assessment of their service in order to improve on their services.

Originality/value

This research and its findings will assist Nigerian (and other) ISPs to improve their services to their clients. Using the results of this study, cybercafés and other ISP clients will know what to take into consideration before signing up with any ISP.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Christine Urquhart

Meta-synthesis of the research evidence adds value to the process of literature reviewing, providing useful knowledge for researchers, practitioners and policymakers. The…

Abstract

Meta-synthesis of the research evidence adds value to the process of literature reviewing, providing useful knowledge for researchers, practitioners and policymakers. The aim of the chapter is to explain what meta-synthesis involves and how it illuminates our understanding of concepts. Previous papers on meta-synthesis (by the author) have reviewed research strategies in information behaviour research and methods for meta-synthesis, discussed application of meta-synthesis to research on information behaviour of women, and proposed methods suitable for integrating information literacy research. Meta-synthesis methods have been applied to many areas of social science research. The literature review examines how to reduce the risks involved in suitable for integrating qualitative research or qualitative and quantitative research; outlines the main approaches used in meta-synthesis before explaining the processes used in a meta-synthesis of research on information behaviour of women, reflects on the meta-synthesis methods used, and which might have been used, and shows what meta-synthesis achieves. Meta-synthesis should be used more in information behaviour research, but it is a rigorous process, requiring time and effort to get useful results. On the other hand, meta-synthesis provides more new knowledge, and a deeper understanding of our ideas, than a conventional literature review.

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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