Search results

1 – 10 of 83
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

J.P. Minkes and A.L. Minkes

This outline paper stems from the shared interest of a criminologist and a scholar in business organisation in the problem of responsibility in the large and complex…

Abstract

This outline paper stems from the shared interest of a criminologist and a scholar in business organisation in the problem of responsibility in the large and complex modern corporation. For the criminologist, this has a particular significance in the context of corporate crime; for the student of management, it opens up questions of decision making and control. For both, it raises considerations of business ethics as well as the function of law in regulating business practice. In particular, there is the central question of how an organisation can, per se, be held criminally liable, without the present requirement in English law, of identifying a ‘controlling mind’ Within it.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 1 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Kristen Gillespie-Lynch, Patrick Dwyer, Christopher Constantino, Steven K. Kapp, Emily Hotez, Ariana Riccio, Danielle DeNigris, Bella Kofner and Eric Endlich

Purpose: We critically examine the idea of neurodiversity, or the uniqueness of all brains, as the foundation for the neurodiversity movement, which began as an autism…

Abstract

Purpose: We critically examine the idea of neurodiversity, or the uniqueness of all brains, as the foundation for the neurodiversity movement, which began as an autism rights movement. We explore the neurodiversity movement's potential to support cross-disability alliances that can transform cultures.

Methods/Approach: A neurodiverse team reviewed literature about the history of the neurodiversity movement and associated participatory research methodologies and drew from our experiences guiding programs led, to varying degrees, by neurodivergent people. We highlight two programs for autistic university students, one started by and for autistics and one developed in collaboration with autistic and nonautistic students. These programs are contrasted with a national self-help group started by and for stutterers that is inclusive of “neurotypicals.”

Findings: Neurodiversity-aligned practices have emerged in diverse communities. Similar benefits and challenges of alliance building within versus across neurotypes were apparent in communities that had not been in close contact. Neurodiversity provides a framework that people with diverse conditions can use to identify and work together to challenge shared forms of oppression. However, people interpret the neurodiversity movement in diverse ways. By honing in on core aspects of the neurodiversity paradigm, we can foster alliances across diverse perspectives.

Implications/ Values: Becoming aware of power imbalances and working to rectify them is essential for building effective alliances across neurotypes. Sufficient space and time are needed to create healthy alliances. Participatory approaches, and approaches solely led by neurodivergent people, can begin to address concerns about power and representation within the neurodiversity movement while shifting public understanding.

Details

Disability Alliances and Allies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-322-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Wil Oonk, Fred Goffree and Nico Verloop

When designing learning environments in primary teacher education, there is an attempt to represent real teaching practice in an authentic way to prospective teachers…

Abstract

When designing learning environments in primary teacher education, there is an attempt to represent real teaching practice in an authentic way to prospective teachers. When constructing these environments, teacher educators have to consider how to best motivate the student teacher, identifying the most relevant practice-based principles and the ways in which the theory and practice can be bridged. There are other considerations as well. For example, in the Netherlands, as in some other countries, teacher education is changing drastically. Controversial teacher education curricula, consisting of primary school subjects originated after more than one hundred years of reflection on the subject matter of primary education and the ways teachers have taught, have been replaced by curricula merely intended to improve the general professionalization of the prospective teacher, neglecting the school subjects. More specifically, the new objective is to adequately prepare students to become competent beginning teachers.

Details

Using Video in Teacher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-232-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 April 2015

Anne Marie FitzGerald

School leaders in small to mid-size urban districts face shifting policy environments, increased accountability, fiscal austerity, and unfunded mandates, as they work to…

Abstract

School leaders in small to mid-size urban districts face shifting policy environments, increased accountability, fiscal austerity, and unfunded mandates, as they work to improve student learning and close achievement gaps. This chapter focuses on one aspect of school reform: the role of families in supporting students’ success. Given shifting demographics nationwide, recommendations for two-way partnerships with Latino families will be proffered in light of renewed definitions and an increasingly robust research base.

Details

Leading Small and Mid-Sized Urban School Districts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-818-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Robert Smith

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship in Policing and Criminal Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-056-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Bradley Tatar

South Koreans in the city of Ulsan claim that eating whale meat is a tradition, but what is the role of SMOs in making whaling into a tradition identified with a local…

Abstract

South Koreans in the city of Ulsan claim that eating whale meat is a tradition, but what is the role of SMOs in making whaling into a tradition identified with a local identity? In following account of a confrontation that took place in Korea between anti-whaling protesters from Greenpeace and local defenders of whaling, it is shown that tradition is not an inevitable outcome of conserving the past; instead, it is an outcome of mobilization, framing, and choices made by movement participants. Tradition in the whaling town of Ulsan was formed through the encounter between opposed social movements, prompting strategic choices of counterframing, frame bridging, and the dissonance between framing and feeling rules. Through the encounters with transnational activists, the Korean defenders of whaling refashioned themselves as rooted cosmopolitans, utilizing global norms to justify local practices in the name of heritage and tradition.

Details

Power and Protest
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-834-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2018

Orly Shapira-Lishchinsky

Abstract

Details

International Aspects of Organizational Ethics in Educational Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-778-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Mathew Donald

Abstract

Details

Leading and Managing Change in the Age of Disruption and Artificial Intelligence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-368-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Michael W. Small and Leonard Minkes

The purpose of this investigation is to look at four organisations to see whether they meet the criteria of learning communities. Two are involved with higher education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this investigation is to look at four organisations to see whether they meet the criteria of learning communities. Two are involved with higher education, one is an army unit, and the fourth is an organisation responsible for aviation safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was based on qualitative analyses of what made the four organisations learning communities. This comprised interviews with key personnel and responding to a 15‐item questionnaire.

Findings

In the Australian example, specialised areas of responsibility were established to facilitate change. In the Indonesian example, a colonial past, a political/cultural divide, a feudalistic approach to modern day problems and a rich tradition presented a challenge to innovation. In the army unit, highly specialised knowledge had to be acquired, adapted and applied. In the aviation safety organisation, technological issues specifying flight operations were the main focus. This organisation was akin to both a learning organisation and an innovative knowledge community, although working within a bureaucratic structure.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation was access to personnel such as CEOs. Another was translating the questionnaire into Indonesian. A third was related to confidentiality, i.e. should participants reveal the identity of their parent organisation, and their own?

Practical implications

The study identified the need to re‐define strategic objectives. Organisations must undertake this task when faced with changing circumstances.

Originality/value

The paper has value because it looks at effective, learning communities and the formal and the informal learning process.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 29 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2016

Bridgie A. Ford, Shernavaz Vakil and Rachel J. Boit

The essentiality of family involvement in the schooling process is evident from the vast directives embedded within federal mandates, professional standards for teachers…

Abstract

The essentiality of family involvement in the schooling process is evident from the vast directives embedded within federal mandates, professional standards for teachers and administrators, parent organizations, and advocacy groups. Yet, as explicit as legislative mandates and professional standards are regarding parental rights and involvement, they do not require definitive roles of the family. Several factors influence the lack of a decisive definition regarding the role of the family in the schooling process. Those include the different perspectives on what constitutes a family structurally and functionally, the socio-cultural and political diversity within and among populations, the move to an inclusive education framework, the various terms used to describe parental involvement, the realization that no one family model fits the demographic diversity existing in today’s school districts, and the rights of family members to select their level of involvement. Given the importance of family engagement and student outcomes, three fundamental questions addressed in this chapter are, “How can inclusive schools enhance productive collaborative family engagement networks?” “How can the family be empowered to voluntarily participate within those networks?” and “How can inclusive schools connect with teacher preparation programs to promote the competency of educators for those collaborative family/school engagement networks?” In this chapter we delineate an interactive triad conceptual model with the school as the “connecting agent” to build relationships with families and teacher preparation, setting the stage for productive family engagement as partners in inclusive settings.

Details

General and Special Education Inclusion in an Age of Change: Roles of Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-543-0

Keywords

1 – 10 of 83