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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2014

Jamshid Beheshti, Mohammed J. AlGhamdi, Charles Cole, Dhary Abuhimed and Isabelle Lamoureux

The chapter describes a four-year research project, the objective of which was to design and develop an intervention tool to assist middle school students in their…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter describes a four-year research project, the objective of which was to design and develop an intervention tool to assist middle school students in their information seeking when engaged in an inquiry-based learning project.

Methodology/approach

Bonded design method was used to design a proof-of-concept (POC) low-tech Guide, and focus group and Informant Design methods were utilized to develop a Web Guide.

Findings

In creating an intervention tool, whether low-tech paper-based or high-tech websites, different methodologies that relied heavily on the participation of students in the design process were successfully utilized.

Practical implications

The research shows that participation of children and adolescents in designing the content of technology for educational use is imperative.

Originality/value

This is a long-term research project, which is unparalleled and unique in its scope, duration, breadth, and depth. Having access to the grade eight classes in a single school over a four-year period has proven to be a remarkable research opportunity, seldom reported in the literature.

Details

New Directions in Children’s and Adolescents’ Information Behavior Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-814-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2010

F.J.P. Reis, L. Malcher, F.M. Andrade Pires and J.M.A. César de Sá

The purpose of this paper is to perform a numerical assessment of two recently proposed extensions of the Gurson‐Tveegard‐Needleman ductile damage constitutive model under…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to perform a numerical assessment of two recently proposed extensions of the Gurson‐Tveegard‐Needleman ductile damage constitutive model under low stress triaxiality.

Design/methodology/approach

One of the most widely used ductile damage models is the so‐called Gurson‐Tveegard‐Needleman model, commonly known as GTN model. The GTN model has embedded into its damage formulation the effects of nucleation, growth and coalescence of micro‐voids. However, the GTN model does not include void distortion and inter‐void linking in the damage evolution. To overcome this limitation, some authors have proposed the introduction of different shear mechanisms based on micromechanical grounds or phenomenological assumptions. Two of these constitutive formulations are reviewed in this contribution, numerically implemented within a quasi‐static finite element framework and their results critically appraised.

Findings

Through the analysis of the evolution of internal variables, such as damage and effective plastic strain, obtained by performing a set of numerical tests using a Butterfly specimen, it is possible to conclude that the extended GTN models are in close agreement with experimental evidence.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the results obtained with the modified GTN models have shown improvements, it can also be observed that both shear mechanisms have inherent limitations in the prediction of the location of fracture onset for some specific stress states.

Originality/value

From the results reported, it is possible to identify some shortcomings in the recently proposed extensions of the GTN model and point out the direction of further improvements.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1932

J.L. Hutchinson

IT has been the practice at the official Air Ministry Testing Establishments at Martlesham and Felixstowe to issue with each complete performance report an analytical…

Abstract

IT has been the practice at the official Air Ministry Testing Establishments at Martlesham and Felixstowe to issue with each complete performance report an analytical picture of the performance. This picture is commonly called “Figure 4” because it appeared as Fig. 4 of R. & M. 1140. It is reproduced in Fig. 1. Its physical significance is by no means apparent, and to the practical engineer who appreciates physical significance mainly through his visual imagination it must sometimes have been more mystifying than simplifying. But, as is shown in what follows, the physical significance can be explained naturally and elegantly in terms of the “unit plane” of unit size and wing loading.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1932

J.L. Hutchinson

IT has long been a subject of comment at Martlesham Heath that practically all the aircraft put through performance trials there take approximately the same time to reach…

Abstract

IT has long been a subject of comment at Martlesham Heath that practically all the aircraft put through performance trials there take approximately the same time to reach the service ceiling—about 40 minutes.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 4 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1935

J.L. Hutchinson

THE fact that the engine power in full‐throttle flight is governed by thermodynamic conditions involving the atmospheric pressure and temperature at the air intake; while…

Abstract

THE fact that the engine power in full‐throttle flight is governed by thermodynamic conditions involving the atmospheric pressure and temperature at the air intake; while the engine power in throttled flight is, by adjustment of the throttle position, entirely at the choice of the pilot, is the cause of certain fundamental differences in the correction of full‐throttle and throttled tests to standard conditions. For, whereas full‐throttle flight, in which the aerodynamic forces are subject to a thermodynamical limiting condition, involves both aerodynamics and thermodynamics, throttled flight is purely aerodynamic. A simple illustration is provided by throttled level flight in which the throttle is adjusted until the airscrew thrust is equal to the drag at the air speed selected by the pilot; that is, the engine power is fixed by aerodynamic conditions alone.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Martin Fojt

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Marketing Intelligence & Planning is split into seven sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Marketing…

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Marketing Intelligence & Planning is split into seven sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Marketing Strategy; Customer Service; Sales Management/Sundry; Promotion; Marketing Research/Customer Behaviour; Product Management; Logistics and Distribution.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

H. Gin Chong and Gerald Vinten

Materiality is an ill‐defined yet important concept in auditing. However, lack of an auditing guideline exposes auditors to possible litigations due to failure to detect…

Abstract

Materiality is an ill‐defined yet important concept in auditing. However, lack of an auditing guideline exposes auditors to possible litigations due to failure to detect material misstatement in the financial statements. This paper assesses decisions by UK courts on materiality thresholds. The results from 28 selected cases failed to reveal any consistency in the adoption of materiality thresholds. A guideline is urgently needed by the Auditing Practices Board to increase consistency in decisions on material transactions/events.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Hugh Munby, Mike Zanibbi, Cheryl‐Anne Poth, Nancy L. Hutchinson, Peter Chin and Antoinette Thornton

This paper aims to describe an instructional study of three cases of work‐based education students (in co‐operative education in Canada), described by their teachers as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe an instructional study of three cases of work‐based education students (in co‐operative education in Canada), described by their teachers as ranging from high achieving to low achieving.

Design/methodology/approach

The three students are given metacognitive instruction to enhance their workplace learning. The instruction is based on findings from a population of recent case studies of learning in the workplace and is shared with the students, with their teachers, and with their workplace supervisors. Interviews and observations are used to describe the variable success of metacognitive instruction in the three workplace settings.

Findings

The paper finds that, while the teachers do not implement the materials fully, both the employers and the students find the metacognitive questions that make up the instructional materials to be useful and have suggestions for how the instructional materials should be used in workplaces. The instructional materials are appended.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on enhancing their workplace learning among work‐based education students.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Derek H. Berg, Jennifer Taylor, Nancy L. Hutchinson, Hugh Munby, Joan Versnel and Peter Chin

The purpose of this paper is to describe the assessment practices reported by Canadian educators and workplace supervisors involved in exemplary work‐based education (WBE…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the assessment practices reported by Canadian educators and workplace supervisors involved in exemplary work‐based education (WBE) programs for high‐school students.

Design/methodology/approach

Six focus groups were conducted, four with teachers and coordinators and two with workplace supervisors from exemplary WBE programs, to identify the features of these exemplary programs that prepare adolescents to participate in WBE, that prepare workplace supervisors to mentor WBE students, and that characterize the day‐to‐day interactions in the workplace through which adolescents learn. Surprisingly, in the absence of any questions directly focused on assessment, participants spoke at length and with passion about the purpose and nature of assessment in their outstanding WBE programs.

Findings

Analyses of these interviews revealed six themes that describe the range of assessment practices associated with these three features of exemplary programs: identification of student interests and abilities; student self‐assessment; communication of expectations and responsibilities; contextualized assessment; collaboration between school and workplace; and connections between assessment and instruction.

Originality/value

The findings highlight practical assessment procedures, for teachers and workplace supervisors, which facilitate the meaningful participation and learning of students in WBE programs and of workers in the workplace.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

THE usual methods for obtaining data on the hydrodynamic characteristics of flying boats during flight tests involve motion pictures of an instrument panel and records of…

Abstract

THE usual methods for obtaining data on the hydrodynamic characteristics of flying boats during flight tests involve motion pictures of an instrument panel and records of oscillograph traces. The analysis of the photographic records is so time consuming that the results are not always available when needed, and in many cases more data are accumulated than is physically possible to analyse. In order to conserve manpower and to obtain directly usable data, new methods have been developed for making quantitative hydrodynamic flight tests. The test techniques were devised to relate, whenever possible, numerical values to sensations experienced by the pilot of a flying boat during take‐off and landing.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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