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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

J. English, T.C. Haupt and J.J. Smallwood

Construction by its very nature constitutes a challenge in terms of health and safety (H&S) and ergonomics as it exposes workers to a range of health, safety, and…

Abstract

Construction by its very nature constitutes a challenge in terms of health and safety (H&S) and ergonomics as it exposes workers to a range of health, safety, and ergonomic hazards, manual handling included. Internationally, women constitute a minor percentage of the construction workforce. Furthermore, perceptions exist that women are not suited to construction, that construction work is too physical for women, and that the image of the industry discourages participation by women. Whether or not perceptions are just, they are important as people act on them. A study was initiated to determine perceptions relative to: participation of women in general; their role; their capacity; their impact; their potential contribution; barriers to their participation; and general and gender specific issues. The paper reports on studies conducted in South Africa and Tanzania, the salient findings being: women have a role in construction; increased participation by women will contribute to improving the image of construction; women have requirements related to their gender and roles; some construction materials constitute a manual materials handling problem to women, and current welfare facilities for women (such as medical support or child care) are inadequate. The paper concludes that endeavours are necessary to change attitudes, promote participation by women, accommodate women, and improve conditions, particularly H&S.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Arieh Riskin, Peter Bamberger, Amir Erez and Aya Zeiger

Incivility is widespread in the workplace and has been shown to have significant affective and behavioral consequences. However, the authors still have a limited…

Abstract

Incivility is widespread in the workplace and has been shown to have significant affective and behavioral consequences. However, the authors still have a limited understanding as to whether, how and when discrete incivility events impact team performance. Adopting a resource depletion perspective and focusing on the cognitive implications of such events, the authors introduce a multi-level model linking the adverse effects of such events on team members’ working memory – the “workbench” of the cognitive system where most planning, analyses, and management of goals occur – to team effectiveness. The model which the authors develop proposes that that uncivil interpersonal behavior in general, and rudeness – a central manifestation of incivility – in particular, may place a significant drain on individuals’ working memory capacity, affecting team effectiveness via its effects on individual performance and coordination-related team emergent states and action-phase processes. In the context of this model, the authors offer an overarching framework for making sense of disparate findings regarding how, why and when incivility affects performance outcomes at multiple levels. More specifically, the authors use this framework to: (a) suggest how individual-level cognitive impairment and weakened coordinative team processes may mediate these incivility-based effects, and (b) explain how event, context, and individual difference factors moderators may attenuate or exacerbate these cognition-mediated effects.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

J.J. Smallwood and T.C. Haupt

The purpose of this paper is to consider the impact on architects of recently introduced Construction Regulations in South Africa.

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1093

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the impact on architects of recently introduced Construction Regulations in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the passing of the first anniversary of the promulgation of the Construction Regulations, a survey was conducted to determine the perceptions of member practices of the South African Institute of Architects.

Findings

Findings include: the traditional project parameters in the form of cost, quality, and time are still perceived to be substantially more important than health and safety (H&S); the manifestations of the impact of the Construction Regulations are wide spread – increased H&S awareness predominates among the manifestations, followed by increased consideration for H&S by most stakeholders, and H&S predominates in terms of the extent to which the Construction Regulations will impact on various project parameters.

Originality/value

The paper offers a valid argument for the inclusion of construction H&S to feature more prominently in architectural education and training programmes.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2018

Nnedinma Umeokafor

This purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a study that assessed the attitudes, commitment and impact of public and private sector clients’ involvement in…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a study that assessed the attitudes, commitment and impact of public and private sector clients’ involvement in construction health and safety (H&S) in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured questionnaires were designed based on literature review and a pilot study, and administered to public and private clients in Nigeria’s construction industry. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed to analyse the data.

Findings

The result shows that while clients’ attitudes towards H&S are not encouraging, public clients commitment and attitudes are better than that of private clients. This is emphasised by the significant difference between the categories of clients and: accident investigation; clients auditing contractors H&S records at the preconstruction stage. The common client H&S practice includes conducting site visits and inspections and attending H&S meetings, while engaging in H&S awareness and H&S audit during construction are not common. However, when clients are involved in H&S, it has resulted in a reduction in accidents, compensation claims, rework and improved the relationship between clients and contractors.

Practical implications

The findings form a basis for improving client involvement in H&S (factoring in the differences in clients) which policymakers, the construction industry and academics will find beneficial.

Originality/value

The study contributes to understanding the attitudes and commitment of public and private clients in H&S, evidencing the implications of the differences in their needs, characteristics and behaviours. While the study is the first to investigate the area in Nigeria, it also extends the knowledge of the discourse comparatively in broader terms.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Nnedinma Umeokafor

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a study that identified and assessed the barriers to client involvement in health and safety (H&S) in the Nigerian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a study that identified and assessed the barriers to client involvement in health and safety (H&S) in the Nigerian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

On the basis of literature review and a pilot study, structured questionnaires were designed and administered to clients and their representatives in ongoing construction projects in Nigeria. Descriptive and inferential statistics were then adopted while analysing the data.

Findings

The research reveals that the major barriers to client involvement in H&S in Nigeria’s construction industry focus on the gaps created by lack of H&S legislation in specifying client roles and responsibilities in H&S, trust and confidence in the supply chain, low levels of awareness at various levels, procurement issues, the attitudes of the various members of the project team and resource-related issues. In total, 20 barriers to client involvement in H&S were identified and assessed.

Practical implications

Policy makers will find the study beneficial as it provides a good understanding of the issues to address while making policies that seek to involve the client in H&S in Nigeria.

Originality/value

While the findings offer insight on the barriers to client involvement in H&S in Nigeria’s construction industry, the study also contributes to the discourse in developing countries. The paper recommends transparent steps in procurement, H&S legislation that factors in economic incentives and community and financial institutions contributions to involving clients in H&S. The study is the first attempt to investigate the barriers to client involvement in construction H&S in Nigeria, contributing to the dearth of H&S literature in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Seirgei Miller, Theo C. Haupt and Nicholas Chileshe

The cooperative education model adopted by Universities of Technology in South Africa embodies the notion that both education and training are equally essential. It…

Abstract

The cooperative education model adopted by Universities of Technology in South Africa embodies the notion that both education and training are equally essential. It incorporates productive work into the curriculum as a regular and integral element of a higher education course. The present model involves three cooperative partners namely, the university, student and employer. It should, therefore, be evident that cooperative education has two main components, namely an academic component and an experiential learning component, both of which are integral to its success. To enable students to understand the relationship between academic subjects and the world of work, cooperative education involves restructuring the educational experience. For some time, industry employer representatives have suggested that education and training offered at Universities of Technology do not always address the needs of industry. They argue that graduates lack the necessary theoretical skills, training and managerial understanding to ensure immediate meaningful employment. These inadequacies contribute to unemployment and the lack of advancement opportunity within their chosen careers. In addition, there is a need to examine the perceptions of students regarding course content before they go into industry. This was the motivation for this research. The aims of the research project are twofold. Firstly, to examine the course content offered within the civil engineering diploma programme, and secondly to measure the levels of subject satisfaction. Using an exploratory approach through a survey of 123 students, this study explores the course content and satisfaction levels based on study areas in the first year program. The results indicate that students generally perceive the subject Communication Skills to be least satisfying whereas Mathematics is considered to be the most satisfying subject. This paper concludes by presenting the subject satisfaction index tool which contributes to the range of intervention strategies as envisaged by the CIDB. This further contributes towards the improvement of the overall quality of University of Technology civil engineering academic programs and also the subsequent productive employability of its graduates.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Michael Klesel, Frederike Marie Oschinsky, Colin Conrad and Bjoern Niehaves

This study sought to distinguish characteristics of cognitive processes while using information technology. In particular, it identifies similarities and differences…

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1190

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to distinguish characteristics of cognitive processes while using information technology. In particular, it identifies similarities and differences between mind wandering and cognitive absorption in technology-related settings in an effort to develop a deeper understanding of the role that mind wandering plays when using information technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was gathered using an online survey including responses from 619 English-speaking adults in 2019. We applied a confirmatory factor analysis and used a robust variant of maximum likelihood estimator with robust standard errors and a Satorra–Bentler scaled test statistic. The data analysis procedure was conducted with the R environment using the psych package for descriptive analysis, and lavaan to investigate the factorial structure and the underlying correlations.

Findings

We discuss the benefits of carefully differentiating between cognitive processes in Information Systems research and depict avenues how future research can address current shortcomings with a careful investigation of neurophysiological antecedents.

Originality/value

To date, mind wandering has been explored as a single phenomenon, though research in reference disciplines has begun to distinguish varieties and how they distinctly impact behavior. We demonstrate that this distinction is also important for our discipline by showing how two specific types of mind wandering (i.e. deliberate and spontaneous mind wandering) are differently correlated with sub-dimensions of cognitive absorption, a well-studied construct.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

O.O. Ugwu and T.C. Haupt

This paper reports on research that investigated perceptions and prioritization of key performance indicators (KPI) for infrastructure sustainability, from a cross section…

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1763

Abstract

This paper reports on research that investigated perceptions and prioritization of key performance indicators (KPI) for infrastructure sustainability, from a cross section of construction industry stakeholders in Hong Kong and Republic of South Africa. The results show that although there is general agreement on the indicators, there are noticeable differences in stakeholder ranking, which measures their prioritisation of the various indicators. These differences are closely linked to the level of development of the respective country and hence macro‐level priorities in formulating their sustainable development agenda. The most significant agreements are on indicators related to health and safety, while there are significant disagreements on some indicators related to environment, economy and project management and administration. The study provides empirical evidence of such underlying differences. The paper discusses the implications and challenges in addressing sustainability and sustainable development in developed and developing countries. The paper discusses the findings from the two‐country comparative studies and provides validated indicators for infrastructure sustainability. Recommendations are given on the application of these indicators for decision‐support and integrated sustainability appraisal in infrastructure project (SUSAIP).

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Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2017

Nicola Pless, Filomena Sabatella and Thomas Maak

Recent years have brought significant advances in research on behavioral ethics. However, research on ethical decision making is still in a nascent stage. Our objective in…

Abstract

Recent years have brought significant advances in research on behavioral ethics. However, research on ethical decision making is still in a nascent stage. Our objective in this paper is twofold: First, we argue that the practice of mindfulness may have significant positive effects on ethical decision making in organizations. More specifically, we will discuss the benefits of “reperceiving” – a meta-mechanism in the practice of mindfulness for ethical decision making and we provide an overview of mindfulness research pertaining to ethical decision making. Subsequently, we explore areas in which neuroscience research may inform research on ethics in organizations. We conclude that both neuroscience and mindfulness offer considerable promise to the field of ethical decision making.

Details

Responsible Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-416-3

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Philip J. Corr, Neil McNaughton, Margaret R. Wilson, Ann Hutchison, Giles Burch and Arthur Poropat

Neuroscience research on human motivation in the workplace is still in its infancy. There is a large industrial and organizational (IO) psychology literature containing…

Abstract

Neuroscience research on human motivation in the workplace is still in its infancy. There is a large industrial and organizational (IO) psychology literature containing numerous theories of motivation, relating to prosocial and productive, and, less so, “darker” antisocial and counter-productive, behaviors. However, the development of a viable over-arching theoretical framework has proved elusive. In this chapter, we argue that basic neuropsychological systems related to approach, avoidance, and their conflict, may provide such a framework, one which we discuss in terms of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) of personality. We argue that workplace behaviors may be understood by reference to the motivational types that are formed from the combination of basic approach, avoidance, and conflict-related personalities. We offer suggestions for future research to explore workplace behaviors in terms of the wider literature on the neuroscience of motivation.

Details

Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-474-7

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