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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

K.B. Hollman, R.D. Hayes and J.H. Murrey

Examines various methods which can be used to improve the writingskills of work study practitioners. Considers the need for organizationof ideas, simplicity, clarity…

Abstract

Examines various methods which can be used to improve the writing skills of work study practitioners. Considers the need for organization of ideas, simplicity, clarity, unity, conciseness, cohereness and good grammar. Concludes that the objective of writing is to make messages complete and understandable; that affected, showy writing is inappropriate; and that use of these concepts will result in effective communications.

Details

Work Study, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Peter W. Stonebraker and Helen LaVan

Pay inequity based on gender arguably persists as the compensation issue with the most impact this half century. Oft‐cited evidence is that full‐time employed women are…

Abstract

Pay inequity based on gender arguably persists as the compensation issue with the most impact this half century. Oft‐cited evidence is that full‐time employed women are paid less than two‐thirds the compensation of comparable male colleagues, a statistic which has not changed markedly for 50 years. Although pay differentials based on gender are not unique to the United States, a comparison with Canada and four European countries suggest that the US has a wider pay differential.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Sami M. Abbasi and Kenneth W. Hollman

The Middle East has been overlooked by American companies as aregion in which to explore market opportunities. Suggests that this islargely due to ignorance of, and bias…

Abstract

The Middle East has been overlooked by American companies as a region in which to explore market opportunities. Suggests that this is largely due to ignorance of, and bias towards, the culture and politics of the Middle East. Discusses aspects of Middle East culture and situational determinants which American companies would be wise to assimilate and suggests practices to carry out or avoid when attempting to form business relationships in the Middle East.

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Management Decision, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Dianna Contreras Krueger, Dianna L. Stone and Eugene Stone-Romero

The aim of this paper was to assess the main and interactive effects of job applicant conscientiousness, and nurturing job demands on ratings of overweight female…

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1736

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper was to assess the main and interactive effects of job applicant conscientiousness, and nurturing job demands on ratings of overweight female applicants on job suitability and a hiring recommendation. It also examined relations between rater ethnicity and ratings of the job suitability of normal and overweight applicants.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a 2×2×2 experimental design and data from 400 individuals (201 Anglos and 199 Hispanics) with hiring experience to test the study's hypotheses. Participants were randomly assigned to conditions, and asked to review a resume and picture of a normal or overweight applicant. Then, they were asked to rate the applicant's job suitability and make a hiring recommendation.

Findings

The results revealed that: overweight female applicants were rated as more suitable for jobs and more likely to be recommended for hire when they had high rather than low conscientiousness; Hispanics were more likely to recommend overweight applicants for hire than Anglos; and there was a three-way interaction among applicant weight, rater ethnicity, and nurturing job demands for the hiring recommendation criterion.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in a simulated hiring context. Thus, research is needed to determine if the results generalize to actual work settings.

Practical implications

The results suggest that organizations should provide decision makers with detailed information about applicants' conscientiousness, and the nurturing demands of jobs. When these types of information are presented, raters are less likely to display weight-based bias.

Originality/value

Previous research on weight-based bias was not based on a theoretical model, but the present study used a theoretical framework to guide the development of hypotheses (Stone and Colella, 1996; Stone et al., 1992). In addition, it is the first study to examine the effects of overweight applicant conscientiousness and stereotype-job fit on ratings of job suitability, and differences between Hispanic and Anglo views of overweight applicants.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Abigail Moore and Beth Caruso

Area 49 is a group of specialized technology spaces in J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Since the launch of these spaces in 2018…

Abstract

Area 49 is a group of specialized technology spaces in J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Since the launch of these spaces in 2018, librarians have worked with instructors in all disciplines to design unique experiences that support students’ academic success and lifelong learning. However, much of the success of these spaces is due to the extensive research and work that occurred during the planning, construction, and purchasing stages. While the spaces will continue to evolve based on research, emerging technologies, and use, it was this foundation that posed the spaces for success from the start.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Judith C. Simon and Khalid S. Soliman

Teaching effectiveness at higher education institutions has captured the public attention for at least three decades. The majority of higher education institutions have…

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1504

Abstract

Teaching effectiveness at higher education institutions has captured the public attention for at least three decades. The majority of higher education institutions have investigated the relationships between teaching effectiveness and research productivity by measuring teaching effectiveness using students’ evaluations. However, research has indicated that student evaluations are not a reliable measure of performance. This paper introduces an alternative approach to measuring a professor’s performance using student evaluations in the field of information systems. This method measures the significant differences in students’ perceptions with respect to information technology and computers in business, the knowledge gained after taking a particular course, and the effect of the course professor on students’ perceptions. An empirical study involving 328 students at a major university was conducted. Results of the study highlight the contributions of this method in better assessing teaching performance in the area of information systems.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Lynn Deeken, Amy Vecchione, Allison Carr, Shelby Hallman, Lara Herzellah, Natalia Lopez, Rob Rucker, Michael Alfieri, Deborah Tenofsky, Anne Moore, Nancy Fawley, John Glover, Bettina Peacemaker and Amy Pajewski

This paper aims to demonstrate the variety of ways institutions and their libraries approach student success both conceptionally and operationally.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the variety of ways institutions and their libraries approach student success both conceptionally and operationally.

Design/methodology/approach

Librarians from eight different institutions of higher education were given a series of questions about student success on their campuses and in their libraries. They responded with written essays describing their experiences and perspectives.

Findings

The contributed pieces in this second installment are collected together and a variety of ways the academic library engage with “student success” are discussed. Initiatives include high-impact practices, fostering academic rapport and creating a sense of belonging, experiential learning and creative spaces and professional development.

Originality/value

These examples help to observe what is happening throughout higher education and see potential paths forward at the institutions engaged in this work.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

David Thompson

Sex has increasingly been constructed as a problem for men with learning disabilities. Research has focused on their vulnerability to abuse and their capacity to exploit…

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257

Abstract

Sex has increasingly been constructed as a problem for men with learning disabilities. Research has focused on their vulnerability to abuse and their capacity to exploit. There are also the additional fears of their sexual activity leading to HIV infection or pregnancy. Notions of sexual rights and sexual pleasure are lost in such a discourse. This paper looks in detail at the actual experience of sex for men with learning disabilities, based on qualitative interviews. It paints a very uncomfortable picture, leading to the title question: is sex a good thing for men with learning disabilities?

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Somaly Kim Wu and Donna Lanclos

The purpose of this paper is to describe the process and work undertaken by the library anthropologist and the Usability Task Force (UTF) for reconfiguring the library's…

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2449

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the process and work undertaken by the library anthropologist and the Usability Task Force (UTF) for reconfiguring the library's physical and virtual spaces to meet the educational needs and expectations of users, including students, faculty, and community patrons.

Design/methodology/approach

Through formal usability studies and ethnographic research, the paper describes the process and work undertaken by the library anthropologist and the UTF.

Findings

Through surveys, focus groups observation data were obtained about the current study and web habits of undergraduates and faculty.

Originality/value

This paper presents an ethnographic approach to policy development and implementation to re‐orient the physical and virtual library environments at a large research library. Libraries and library administrators will find value in the policies established and processes outlined for the development of user‐centered learning spaces.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2019

Amber Murrey

Oriented to ongoing student and university momentums for decolonial futures, the purpose of this paper is to interrogate the role and status of mainstream international…

Abstract

Purpose

Oriented to ongoing student and university momentums for decolonial futures, the purpose of this paper is to interrogate the role and status of mainstream international development curricula and pedagogies by critiquing two absences in the sub-discipline’s teaching formulae: appropriations and assassinations.

Design/methodology/approach

The author draws from a decade of research on oil extraction in Central Africa, including ethnographic work with two communities in Cameroon along the Chad–Cameroon Oil Pipeline; four years of research (interview-based and unofficial or grey materials) on the 1983 August Revolution in Burkina Faso and assassination of Thomas Sankara; and five years of experience teaching international development in North America, Western Europe and North and Eastern Africa.

Findings

Through a critical synthesis of political and rhetorical practices that are often considered in isolation (i.e. political assassinations and corporate appropriation of Indigenous knowledges), the author makes the case for what the author calls pedagogical disobedience: an anticipatory decolonial development curricula and praxis that is attentive to the simultaneity of violence and misappropriation within colonial operations of power (i.e. “coloniality of power” or “coloniality”).

Originality/value

This paper contributes to debates within international development about the future of the discipline given its neo-colonial and colonial constitutions and functions with a grounded attention to how this opens up possibilities for teaching praxis and scholarship in action.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 46 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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