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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2007

Hugh Martyn and Robert Scurr

In common with other public sector bodies, the police service recognises that the development of leadership capability amongst its workforce is key to improving levels of…

Abstract

In common with other public sector bodies, the police service recognises that the development of leadership capability amongst its workforce is key to improving levels of both performance and service delivery. The recently developed Police Leadership Qualities Framework lays out a clearly defined model of leadership, and is underpinned by a framework of values and behaviours that enable that model to be developed in practice. This paper expands on one of the key underlying principles of the model that leadership is evident at all ranks and grades of the service, and is a skill that can be developed. This article postulates that each individual has their own ‘leadership space’ which it is important they are able to fill effectively. Individual and organisational failings often occur when this ‘space’ is not properly filled ‐ through lack of skill, development opportunity or experience. The paper considers a cognitive and behaviourist approach to learning and explores some of the ways in which leadership capability is developed in the police service.

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

J.H. Goslings and V.L. Petri

Looks at the risk/return characteristics of real estate on thebasis of both appraisal and market values. Broadens this analysis toinclude inflation. Makes a series of…

Abstract

Looks at the risk/return characteristics of real estate on the basis of both appraisal and market values. Broadens this analysis to include inflation. Makes a series of observations about the role of real estate in efficient investment portfolios. Concludes that as long as direct real estate is valued at appraisal value it is unmistakably a solid inflation hedge.

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Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Helena Gosling

The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the extent to which recovery capital can provide a theoretical and practical way in which to explore, explain and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the extent to which recovery capital can provide a theoretical and practical way in which to explore, explain and communicate Therapeutic Community (TC) processes and practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a 31-month ethnographic study of one situated residential TC in England.

Findings

The findings are usefully thought out as parallels, process and progress. Parallels can be drawn between the recovery capital literature and longstanding TC principles and prescriptions. The term process is significant as it illustrates how concepts proposed by the recovery capital literature can be employed, alongside traditional TC ideals, to create a practice-focussed framework that is able to open up day-to-day processes and communicate (within and beyond the TC movement) how and why TCs provide an environment that is conducive to recovery. The ethos and application of the term progress illustrate the fundamental premise of this paper. Recovery capital provides a more contemporary way in which to understand and communicate the work that takes place in a TC.

Research limitations/implications

Synthesising the concepts proposed by both the TC and recovery capital literature provides a contemporary, practice-focussed framework for the TC, thus re-enforcing the modalities place within an increasingly competitive field.

Originality/value

Synthesising the concepts proposed by both the TC and recovery capital literature provides an original, contemporary, practice-focussed framework for the TC, thus re-enforcing the modalities place within an increasingly competitive field.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Helena Gosling and Rowdy Yates

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to reflect upon what the global therapeutic community (TC) movement has learnt from coronavirus and to consider how TCs will continue…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to reflect upon what the global therapeutic community (TC) movement has learnt from coronavirus and to consider how TCs will continue to adapt and evolve in a post-pandemic climate.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a viewpoint paper based on the authors’ participation in an international learning event whereby speakers from TCs from around the world spoke about how they adapted their services to overcome adversity.

Findings

The findings are usefully thought out as shelter, creativity, reintegration and employment, technology and roots. Based on the material discussed in the learning event, it would seem that the global TC movement has engaged in a process of looking to the past to move forward by drawing upon founding principles and prescriptions of the TC tradition, rooted in humanistic and indeed humanitarian responses to staff, client and sociocultural needs.

Originality/value

According to the author, this paper is one of the first attempts to capture how TCs from across the globe have responded to the threat of coronavirus.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 41 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Rethinking the Business Models of Business Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-875-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Jeffrey L. Herman and Stephen J. Zaccaro

This chapter examines the complexity of global leaders themselves. As global leadership research has begun to move beyond a limiting overemphasis on skills and…

Abstract

This chapter examines the complexity of global leaders themselves. As global leadership research has begun to move beyond a limiting overemphasis on skills and competencies, we merge one focus on the deep structure of leader cognition with a focus on cultural identity that has matured largely independently. In so doing, we seek to push the field toward answering the broader question of what makes a global leader sufficiently complex to handle the vast complexities of the role. We place the construct of self-concept complexity as central to the performance of global leaders in ways ranging from organizational performance to social and community responsibility. By advancing our understanding of the role of self-concept complexity in driving global leadership outcomes, this research seeks to spur further theoretical development and practical application toward a deeper comprehension of the complexity of truly global leaders.

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Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Claudius Bachmann

Dealing with the issue of “Can practical wisdom be taught in business schools?,” in this chapter, I argue for an inquiry-based learning approach as a way of improving…

Abstract

Dealing with the issue of “Can practical wisdom be taught in business schools?,” in this chapter, I argue for an inquiry-based learning approach as a way of improving today’s management education. Following along these lines, I initially focus on the current criticism of today’s management education in business schools. Then, I provide an introduction into the recent interest in the topic of practical wisdom by management scholars that emerged as part of an effort to overcome these failures of business schools. These attempts, however, remain on a rather vague or theoretical level and are lacking helpful guidance on how universities might implement this concept into their educational offerings. In order to remedy these shortcomings, I introduce a competency-based three-pillar model of practical wisdom and combine it with an inquiry-based learning approach. A comprehensive scheme highlights how the particular competencies of practical wisdom can be fostered over the successive stages of the inquiry process. Most importantly, by describing a MA-thesis program as a successful example of these ideas in application, I provide concrete suggestions of how to facilitate the growth of practically wise competencies by means of an inquiry-based learning approach.

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Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Theodora Issa, Tomayess Issa, Rohini Balapumi, Lydia Maketo and Umera Imtinan

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question ‘Why reflection is important to introduce in the teaching and learning’. This paper commences with a brief literature

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question ‘Why reflection is important to introduce in the teaching and learning’. This paper commences with a brief literature review on reflection, followed by the provision of tentative results of a study on the role of reflection in learning. Data collected from a sample population of 257 undergraduate students at business ethics undergraduate class in Australia were analysed. The data were collected from students’ own reflections that formed part of two of their assessments in the unit. In the first assessment, students were asked to reflect on their own moral development, using Schon’s reflection in and on action, to allow the markers understand the students’ own moral development as highlighted by Kohlberg levels and stages of Moral Development. In the second assessment, the students were asked to reflect on their personal learning as a global citizen and how this assessment has informed their views and perspective on ethical decision-making process and global citizenship using one of the frameworks introduced during the semester (e.g. situation, task, action, result, learning, planning – S.T.A.R.L.P., Gibbs or Kolb). This paper will not discuss students moral developments levels or their ethical decision making, but, will only discuss the ‘reflection’, thus, the findings from this research come in twofold: (i) students acknowledged the new skills they gained, the development of other skills they had through their reflections, such as critical thinking, time management. (ii) Most of the students have demonstrated an understanding of reflection in higher education, and ethical decision making, through use of different frameworks. However, some students felt reflection is difficult, thus, the paper concludes with a recommendation to introduce reflection in the first year of university.

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Educating for Ethical Survival
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-253-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Thomas Maak, Nicola M. Pless and Markéta Borecká

Two major trends have shaped the international business field over the past decade: globalization and the quest for responsible leadership. Yet, what are the qualities…

Abstract

Two major trends have shaped the international business field over the past decade: globalization and the quest for responsible leadership. Yet, what are the qualities that predispose business leaders to act responsibly in an increasingly complex, interlinked world, and thus to meet new social, environmental, and political responsibilities? How can organizations develop these qualities in their current and future leaders? In this chapter, we provide tentative answers to both questions by fleshing out some of the qualities global leaders need to succeed in a connected world and by comparing three innovative executive development programs that use international service learning assignments as a way to instill these qualities in their executives. These programs are PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Ulysses Program, Pfizer’s Global Health Fellows Program, and IBM’s Corporate Service Corps.

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Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2016

Günter K. Stahl, Christof Miska, Sheila M. Puffer and Daniel J. McCarthy

Highly publicized scandals and increased stakeholder activism for sustainable development have resulted in calls for more responsible global leadership. At the same time…

Abstract

Highly publicized scandals and increased stakeholder activism for sustainable development have resulted in calls for more responsible global leadership. At the same time, emerging economies characterized by weak institutions, political instability, and a shaky rule of law have gained in importance for global business. Under the lens of responsible global leadership, we highlight the challenges that global leaders face in addressing the needs of diverse, cross-boundary stakeholders, with a particular focus on Western multinational enterprises (MNEs) doing business in emerging markets. We identify three prototypical approaches that MNEs and their leaders take in responding to calls for responsible global leadership, focusing on the tensions and possible trade-offs between globally integrated and locally adapted approaches. We discuss the implications in view of managerial decision making and behavior and offer recommendations for how organizations may promote responsible global leadership.

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