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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1958

In a recent food case, heard before a local bench (the actual details being of no special interest or importance for our present purpose), the defendant concerned, very naively…

Abstract

In a recent food case, heard before a local bench (the actual details being of no special interest or importance for our present purpose), the defendant concerned, very naively, and no doubt quite unwittingly, delivered a most profound remark in the course of his statement, throwing an illuminating beam on the dark workings of the minds of those who find themselves up against the law, and one that could well serve as part of a general confession for that too large company who have spent and, we fear, still spend time in attempting, to a greater or lesser extent, its evasion. The individual in question, the owner of a pretty miserable kind of business, said, gesturing defiantly, we imagine, at the local inspectorate in court, that “his shop could make money if he was left alone and not interfered with”. This, of course, is a basic idea in most wrong‐doing, although it is a senti‐ment probably more often thought inwardly than publicly expressed, by anti‐socially minded people from time immemorial, whether honest adulterators of food, sophisticators of drugs, pickpockets, or merely evaders of the just demands of the Inland Revenue.

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British Food Journal, vol. 60 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1975

J.B.M. Coppock

During 1974 three books have appeared on the subject of Triticale; the first ‘Nutritive value of Triticale protein (and the proteins of wheat and rye)’ contains in its title the…

Abstract

During 1974 three books have appeared on the subject of Triticale; the first ‘Nutritive value of Triticale protein (and the proteins of wheat and rye)’ contains in its title the clue to the name of this new cereal. It is an artificial genus synthesised by combining the genomes of wheat (genus Triticum) and rye (genus Secale). The second book, aptly entitled ‘Triticale: first man‐made cereal’ is an account of a symposium jointly sponsored by the American Association of Cereal Chemists and the International Union of Food Science and Technology, held in St. Louis, Missouri in 1973 and the third, quite simply called ‘Triticale’ is an account of an international symposium held in El Batan, Mexico, also in the Autumn of 1973.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 75 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1970

By these we mean the parliamentary counsel responsible for drafting the many statutes and statutory instruments of every kind, against whom there has been much criticism in recent…

Abstract

By these we mean the parliamentary counsel responsible for drafting the many statutes and statutory instruments of every kind, against whom there has been much criticism in recent years for the mass of indigestible legislation, a little of it almost incomprehensible, inflicted on society generally. What prompts us to return to the subject, after so recently castigating it as “hurry scurry” law, is the Labelling of Food Regulations, 1970. Not that this particular measure is anything but good, but looking at it, one cannot help wondering what was the purpose of the 1967 Regulations; a useless exercise in law‐making, since they will never come into force, being precipitately revoked by the new ones. Nor does it seem to have been hurried legislation, since it followed the reports of the Food Standards Committee after a lapse of several years. However, instances in which measures have been rushed through the legislative process, to prove subsequently inadequate, perhaps unworkable in parts, and sometimes completely disastrous, are multiplying during the life of the last Parliament. This may not always be the fault of the ligislature, for sometimes a new problem emerges or grows so rapidly that the law cannot keep up with it; then there is excuse for measures being rushed through to cope.

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British Food Journal, vol. 72 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1962

Coming close upon the Report of the Symposium which considered possible toxicological dangers of cosmetics and toilet preparations, held in London last November by the European…

Abstract

Coming close upon the Report of the Symposium which considered possible toxicological dangers of cosmetics and toilet preparations, held in London last November by the European Committee on Chronic Toxicity Hazards (“Eurotox”), the decision recently announced in the Commons by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Science of the Government‐aided British Industrial Biological Research Association to undertake research to ascertain if toxic hazards exist from colouring matters used in lipsticks, is a small beginning. This prompts the question of how long before “cosmetics” will be added to “food and drugs” in this country as it was in U.S.A. in the nineteen‐thirties. At present there is practically no statutory control over the constituents used in the manufacture of these commodities, the manufacture and sale of which have increased enormously in recent years.

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British Food Journal, vol. 64 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1964

Shops and shopkeepers are a British tradition. More than 150 years ago, we were a nation of shopkeepers, and the picture of shops and the shopping public seemed unchanging. There…

Abstract

Shops and shopkeepers are a British tradition. More than 150 years ago, we were a nation of shopkeepers, and the picture of shops and the shopping public seemed unchanging. There were, of course, the early departmental stores, the co‐operative societies, the multiple shops, the chain‐stores, but the position was much as it had always been and the greatest proportion of retail trade was still in the hands of the traditional type of shopkeeper. The two Wars changed many things, but it was not until after the last War that retail trade really began to change and looking at it objectively and at the food trade particularly, it has become a revolution.

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British Food Journal, vol. 66 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1963

Since world attention has been focussed on the quality and safety of drugs, thought is being given to improving the methods of dealing with this branch of control under the Food…

Abstract

Since world attention has been focussed on the quality and safety of drugs, thought is being given to improving the methods of dealing with this branch of control under the Food and Drugs Act, 1955. This work is entirely different to the several projects now being undertaken, such as the Government‐sponsored “safety committee” dealing with the clinical testing of new drugs before sale; this deals mainly with toxicity trials, therapeutic efficiency and adverse reactions and is designed to prevent such catastrophies as the recent drug‐induced deformities of babies. The recently proposed scheme of the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry for an advisory centre had similar objectives.

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British Food Journal, vol. 65 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1964

The work of protecting the public food supply during the pre‐Christmas rush period can be exhausting, although food inspectors and others engaged nowadays may have achieved the…

Abstract

The work of protecting the public food supply during the pre‐Christmas rush period can be exhausting, although food inspectors and others engaged nowadays may have achieved the proletarian distinction of the shift system and perhaps, overtime pay, but in the old days, we had none of these blessings and supervising the Christmas fare could indeed be a “dog's life”.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 66 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1950

The estimated population of the City of Madras at the present time is about one million. This fact alone, considered in relation to public health, speaks for itself. The Public…

Abstract

The estimated population of the City of Madras at the present time is about one million. This fact alone, considered in relation to public health, speaks for itself. The Public Analyst for the city, who has drawn up this report, acts under the Madras Prevention of Adulteration Act, 1918. The Act, therefore, has been operative for about thirty years. Two graphs are given in the report. One of these shows the number of samples of foods submitted by, it may be supposed, officials corresponding to our food inspectors, each year from 1931 to 1948. The other shows the percentage of samples returned as adulterated for the years 1931 to 1948. From the first graph it appears that the number of samples submitted was about 750 in 1931. In 1948 the number rose to 4,035. From 1931 to 1946 the rise on the whole was steady. From 1946 it was rapid—2,000 in 1946. The curve which expresses the percentage of samples returned as adulterated seems to bear little relation to the first curve. It is most irregular. During the first three or four years the rate of adulteration kept pace with the number of samples collected for analysis. We may suppose that milk is as necessary a constituent of food in Madras as it is elsewhere. Out of the 4,035 samples of food analysed in 1948, 2,054 were milk samples. Out of these 915 were cows‘ milk. The rest consisted of buffalos’ milk or a mixture of cow and buffalo milk, and a number were unspecified. Added water, in nearly every case, was the offence. This ranged from 2 per cent to 81 per cent. Nearly half the cows‘ milk was reported against; half the buffalos’ milk; and about 45 per cent of the mixed milk. If these figures be a measure of the efficiency of the Act of 1918 so far as it relates to the purity of the milk supply the statute would seem to be almost a dead letter. Admittedly many circumstances, especially at the present time, are responsible for the nature and extent of food adulteration in any given district, and these would lead to the unsatisfactory nature of the results just referred to. However, it is suggested that a powerful contributory cause is the inadequacy of the average fine that is inflicted for the offence of food adulteration. In 1944 this was Rs. 59. In 1948 it was Rs. 43, a drop of nearly 25 per cent. “ Let the punishment fit the crime.” The collection and analysis of samples is plainly in the nature of futility unless it be followed by correspondingly vigorous action on the part of the courts against proved offenders. The report remarks: “ Unless a more serious view of offences under the Food Adulteration Act is taken and the maximum penalties provided under the Act are imposed the good effect of increased sampling will be annulled, and much progress cannot be made of effectively suppressing the evil practice of adulteration in the city.” Other samples of foods were analysed and details of the results are given in the report. These show in many cases deliberate, heavy and unscrupulous adulteration which is, unfortunately, but too evident in the milk supply of the city.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

Ian Morton

Health foods have become big business in the UK and the market is dominated by four companies. Sales of health foods have risen from £11 million in 1965 to £18 million in 1970 and…

Abstract

Health foods have become big business in the UK and the market is dominated by four companies. Sales of health foods have risen from £11 million in 1965 to £18 million in 1970 and are still increasing with over 600 health food shops. These foods have been given considerable publicity in the popular press yet any consideration of them should be inseparable from food chemicals, food additives and processed foods. The nutritional merits of health foods are still being argued and many of the claims for their advantages have yet to be objectively proved.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 73 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1950

The Right Hon. Earl De La Warr, P.C., J.P., in his inaugural address to the Congress, expressed his appreciation at being elected President for the ensuing year. He continued : …

Abstract

The Right Hon. Earl De La Warr, P.C., J.P., in his inaugural address to the Congress, expressed his appreciation at being elected President for the ensuing year. He continued : “ Your task, whether you be members or officers of local authorities or members of other professions, is to prevent sickness and disease, rather than to cure it, or, rather, I should put it more positively by saying that you give us the conditions which we need for living healthily. . . . As an agriculturist I cannot but notice your interest in both farming and veterinary problems. You have given time to them in your discussion programme and also in the arrangements that you have made for visiting neighbouring farms. Three years ago I set myself the task of having an all tuberculin tested estate and I am proud to tell you that three‐quarters of my tenants have already achieved that happy state of affairs. Perhaps you will allow me to mention one point here. The cleaning up of our dairy herds and of our milk supplies is of first‐rate importance in any scheme for improving the national health. I hope that in your travels round you will see something of the progress that has been made in clean milk production. The proportion of milk produced on T.T. farms is increasing; this is shown by the fact that the percentage was 18?4 in 1947, 22?2 in 1948 and 25?9 in 1949. It has risen by over 100 million gallons even during the last statistical year, and the first six months of this year look like giving us an almost equally large increase. The inspection of cowsheds has now become the responsibility of the Ministry of Agriculture, but you can still help to encourage clean milk production by your influence on the distributive and consumer side. Not all consumers, by any means, realise the significance of designated milk. You could give them guidance. It is very important also that farmers and landowners should feel that you are their friends and that you consider their efforts to improve this milk to be worth while. If the impression was ever given that doctors and public health authorities rely so much on pasteurisation that it does not really matter very much what sort of milk is produced, great harm might be done. The decision to enter the T.T. scheme involves quite a considerable risk of cows failing in the test, and a considerable initial expenditure of both effort and money. Nobody is ever the worse off for a bit of encouragement, and if you feel able to give it, so much the better for us all. Certainly I for one have a possibly old‐fashioned feeling that, pasteurised or not, I should prefer my milk to start its life clean, all the more so in view of the fact that by no means every pasteurising plant is completely infallible and independent of the care with which human beings operate it. . . . I close by offering you the consolation of not being very much in the news, of not receiving the thanks or gratitude that is due to all the services that you administer, for the sound and simple reason that you are doing them too well to attract attention.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 52 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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