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Article

J. Hyman, H. Ramsay, J. Leopold, L. Baddon and L.C. Hunter

There has been a considerable amount of interest in employee shareownership schemes in the last few years, and this has been mirrored byan increase in publications…

Abstract

There has been a considerable amount of interest in employee share ownership schemes in the last few years, and this has been mirrored by an increase in publications relating to the subject. However, the authors argue that this literature leaves much to be desired, in particular in its implicit assumption that management and employee interests will converge with share ownership. The evidence from two of their case studies indicates a divergence between management objectives and employee responses. It also suggests that trade union attitudes to share ownership may be changing as well.

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Article

John Ramsay, Beverly Wagner and Stephen Kelly

– This paper aims to explore the supply chain management problem of understanding the response of suppliers to buyer behaviours and characteristics.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the supply chain management problem of understanding the response of suppliers to buyer behaviours and characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the relevant literature in search of references to critically assesses the effects of applying the mirror images of the concepts of customer value, satisfaction and product or service quality, developed in the field of marketing, to the field of operations management.

Findings

The study suggests that the new concept of purchase offering quality is worthy of further development in the supply chain management area and that supplier value and supplier satisfaction are useful concepts for understanding supplier behavioural intentions.

Practical implications

The study will help organisations to improve supply chain performance through an enhanced ability of organisations-as-buyers to influence supplier behaviour by modifying aspects of their own behaviour. It should be of particular interest to all organisations in their dealings with recalcitrant and unresponsive suppliers, or buyers with very low levels of power trying to improve the responsiveness of more powerful suppliers.

Originality/value

The paper introduces two new concepts: “purchase offering quality” that describes supplier perceptions of the characteristics and behaviours of buyers offering supplier benefits, and “supplier behavioural intentions” that is a term referring to the responses of suppliers to buyer characteristics and behaviours. This work can form the foundations of an extensive area of new study into organisational supplying behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part

Hanna Jokinen-Gordon and Jill Quadagno

This chapter examines social variations in parent dissatisfaction with children’s medical care and tests whether greater dissatisfaction is associated with less preventive…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines social variations in parent dissatisfaction with children’s medical care and tests whether greater dissatisfaction is associated with less preventive care and unmet medical need.

Methodology/approach

The 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) is a nationally representative cross-sectional sample of parents of U.S. children age 0–17 years (N=78,523). We use a combination of ordinary least squares (OLS) and binary logistic regression to analyze parent dissatisfaction, preventive care, and unmet medical need.

Findings

Our results indicate that parents’ dissatisfaction scores are significantly higher for racial/ethnic minorities, non-English speakers, lower socioeconomic status (SES) respondents, and the uninsured. Furthermore, parent dissatisfaction has a significant and robust association with lack of preventive care and reports of unmet medical need.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the cross-sectional research design, we were unable to determine whether dissatisfaction caused parents to delay children’s medical care, thus resulting in a lack of annual preventive care and greater unmet needs.

Originality/value of chapter

Although there is extensive research on adult perceptions of their own medical care, few sociological studies have examined parents’ perceptions about their children’s care. Yet, there is substantial evidence that parents transmit health-related attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors to their children. As with adult patients, parent satisfaction with their child’s medical care is stratified by social characteristics; however, we also find a strong association between dissatisfaction and use of other important health services. It may be the case that when parents feel that they did not receive satisfactory care, they are more likely to delay, or to forgo, preventive and other health services.

Details

Social Determinants, Health Disparities and Linkages to Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-588-3

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Book part

Erik Poutsma, Paul E. M. Ligthart and Ulke Veersma

Taking an international comparative approach, this chapter investigates the variance in the adoption of employee share ownership and stock option arrangements across…

Abstract

Taking an international comparative approach, this chapter investigates the variance in the adoption of employee share ownership and stock option arrangements across countries. In particular, we investigate the influence of multinational enterprises (MNEs), industrial relations factors, HRM strategies, and market economies on the adoption and spread of the arrangements across countries. We find that industrial relations factors do not explain the variance in adoption by companies in their respective countries. MNEs and HRM strategies are important drivers of adoption. Market economy does not moderate the influence of MNEs on adoption, suggesting that MNEs universally apply the arrangements across borders.

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Book part

Joanne Crawford, Alice Davis, Halimatus Minhat and Mohd Rafee Baharudin

It is estimated that we spend at least a third of our working lives in the workplace and the duration of this, due to the extension of working lives through legislative…

Abstract

It is estimated that we spend at least a third of our working lives in the workplace and the duration of this, due to the extension of working lives through legislative changes and increased pension ages, is set to increase. Ageing of the workforce is a growing concern but health and safety issues cannot be used as an excuse for not employing older workers. A healthy workplace is one where the risks are managed and where workers and their managers work together to improve the work environment and protect the health of the workers. Furthermore, linking this to personal health resources and the local community can improve the health of all involved. Within the workplace this includes both the psychosocial and physical work environment. To create a healthy workplace there is a need to ensure risk management measures are in place and our older workers participation in risk assessment and risk reduction programmes. In addition to this, targeted occupational health promotion programmes may be beneficial. There are few integrated policies with regard to age and work but research does identify good practice, including participation of employees in change measures, senior management commitment and taking a life-course approach. While there are challenges in relation to age-related change, the work ability concept can improve understanding. The use of a comprehensive approach such as Age Management can help employers who have a critical role in making the workplace age-ready.

Details

Managing the Ageing Workforce in the East and the West
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-639-6

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Book part

Marco Gallegati and James B. Ramsey

In this chapter we perform a Monte Carlo simulation study of the errors-in-variables model examined in Ramsey, Gallegati, Gallegati, and Semmler (2010) by using a wavelet…

Abstract

In this chapter we perform a Monte Carlo simulation study of the errors-in-variables model examined in Ramsey, Gallegati, Gallegati, and Semmler (2010) by using a wavelet multiresolution approximation approach. Differently from previous studies applying wavelets to errors-in-variables problem, we use a sequence of multiresolution approximations of the variable measured with error ranging from finer to coarser scales. Our results indicate that multiscale approximations to the variable observed with error based on the coarser scales provide an unbiased asymptotically efficient estimator that also possess good finite sample properties.

Details

Essays in Honor of Jerry Hausman
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-308-7

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Book part

Hanna Jokinen-Gordon

Though it is one of the strongest predictors of vaccine initiation, few studies have examined the social correlates of health care professional (HCP) recommendations of…

Abstract

Purpose

Though it is one of the strongest predictors of vaccine initiation, few studies have examined the social correlates of health care professional (HCP) recommendations of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. This study employs a “fundamental causes” framework to examine whether family socioeconomic status is associated with parent reports of HPV vaccine uptake and HCP recommendation of the vaccine among female youth aged 12–17.

Methodology

Using the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health, a nationally representative sample of parents in the United States, this study documents a clear socioeconomic gradient in HCP recommendation of the HPV vaccine.

Findings

Results from a set of logistic regression models demonstrate that lower income families have significantly lower odds of vaccine initiation; however, the effect of household income is mediated by HCP recommendation. Further analyses reveal that lower income and poor families have reduced odds of receiving a HCP recommendation even when other health care related factors such as insurance status, annual preventive care, and a usual source of care are controlled.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that low income and poor families are less likely to receive needed health information regarding the HPV vaccine, thereby reducing the likelihood of vaccine uptake.

Details

Family and Health: Evolving Needs, Responsibilities, and Experiences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-126-8

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Article

Timothy C. Miller, Michael Cipriano and Robert J. Ramsay

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether auditors interpret the risk of material misstatement (RMM) in accordance with current standards' definition of inherent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether auditors interpret the risk of material misstatement (RMM) in accordance with current standards' definition of inherent risk (IR). It is argued that controls should not be presumed when assessing inherent risk and that inherent risk should be considered separate from and prior to control risk when it is practical to do so. Because auditing standards explicitly require auditors to assess IR without consideration of internal controls (i.e. control risk (CR)), RMM should not be adjusted upward for control deficiencies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors survey and interview practicing auditors to gain an understanding of current risk assessment practice. They then evaluate whether their understanding of risk assessment is in line with current standards.

Findings

Contrary to auditing standards' definition of inherent risk, it appears that auditors presume some level of expected control effectiveness when assessing IR and they may increase RMM in response to internal control deficiencies. Such a presumption is inconsistent with the definition of inherent risk from the Auditing Standards Board (SAS No. 107), Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (AS 8), and International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board (ISA 200). Such misinterpretation may be an inadvertent result of guidance provided by standard setters in the form of SAS No. 109 from the ASB, AS 12 from the PCAOB and ISA 315 from the IAASB, which suggest combining IR and CR into RMM.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited both by the small sample size and the small number of risk factors investigated.

Practical implications

If auditors presume a level of controls in assessing inherent risk, they may reduce audit effectiveness by estimating a lower RMM than is appropriate.

Originality/value

This study presents insights on the interpretation and assessment of audit risk in audit environments where inherent risk is no longer automatically set to be at the maximum. Namely that due to the definition of inherent risk, control information should have a unidirectional downward effect on the risk of material misstatement.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article

Shuhua Mao, Mingyun Gao and Min Zhu

The purpose of this paper is to elevate the accuracy when predicting the gross domestic product (GDP) on research and development (R&D) and to develop the grey delay…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elevate the accuracy when predicting the gross domestic product (GDP) on research and development (R&D) and to develop the grey delay Lotka-Volterra model.

Design/methodology/approach

Considering the lag effects between input in R&D and output in GDP, this paper estimated the delay value via grey delay relation analysis. Taking the delay into original Lotka-Volterra model and combining with the thought of grey theory and grey transform, the authors proposed grey delay Lotka-Volterra model, estimated the parameter of model and gave the discrete time analytic expression.

Findings

Collecting the actual data of R&D and GDP in Wuhan China from 1995 until 2008, this paper figure out that the delay between R&D and GDP was 2.625 year and found the dealy time would would gradually be reduced with the economy increasing.

Practical implications

Constructing the grey delay Lotka-Volterra model via above data, this paper shown that the precision was satisfactory when fitting the data of R&D and GDP. Comparing the forecasts with the actual data of GDP in Wuhan from 2009 until 2012, the error was small.

Social implications

The result shows that R&D and GDP would be both growing fast in future. Wuhan will become a city full of activity.

Originality/value

Considering the lag between R&D and GDP, this work estimated the delay value via a grey delay relation analysis and constructed a novel grey delay Lotka-Volterra model.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

Keywords

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